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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Identification of the genomic insertion site of the thyroid peroxidase promoter-Cre recombinase transgene using a novel, efficient, next-generation DNA sequencing method.

It can be useful to know the transgene insertion site in transgenic mice for a variety of reasons, but determining the insertion site generally is a time consuming, expensive, and laborious task.A simple method is presented to determine transgene insertion sites that combines the enrichment of a sequencing library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for sequences containing the transgene, followed by next-generation sequencing of the enriched library. This method was applied to determine the site of integration of the thyroid peroxidase promoter-Cre recombinase mouse transgene that is commonly used to create thyroid-specific gene deletions.The insertion site was found to be…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

An integrated map of structural variation in 2,504 human genomes.

Structural variants are implicated in numerous diseases and make up the majority of varying nucleotides among human genomes. Here we describe an integrated set of eight structural variant classes comprising both balanced and unbalanced variants, which we constructed using short-read DNA sequencing data and statistically phased onto haplotype blocks in 26 human populations. Analysing this set, we identify numerous gene-intersecting structural variants exhibiting population stratification and describe naturally occurring homozygous gene knockouts that suggest the dispensability of a variety of human genes. We demonstrate that structural variants are enriched on haplotypes identified by genome-wide association studies and exhibit enrichment for…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The effects of read length, quality and quantity on microsatellite discovery and primer development: from Illumina to PacBio.

The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has transformed the way microsatellites are isolated for ecological and evolutionary investigations. Recent attempts to employ NGS for microsatellite discovery have used the 454, Illumina, and Ion Torrent platforms, but other methods including single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing (Pacific Biosciences or PacBio) remain viable alternatives. We outline a workflow from sequence quality control to microsatellite marker validation in three plant species using PacBio circular consensus sequencing (CCS). We then evaluate the performance of PacBio CCS in comparison with other NGS platforms for microsatellite isolation, through simulations that focus on variations in read length, read…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain ATCC 43816 KPPR1, a rifampin-resistant mutant commonly used in animal, genetic, and molecular biology studies.

Klebsiella pneumoniae is an urgent public health threat due to the spread of carbapenem-resistant strains causing serious, and frequently fatal, infections. To facilitate genetic, molecular, and immunological studies of this pathogen, we report the complete chromosomal sequence of a genetically tractable, prototypical strain used in animal models. Copyright © 2014 Broberg et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genome sequencing reveals genomic signature of extreme desiccation tolerance in the anhydrobiotic midge.

Anhydrobiosis represents an extreme example of tolerance adaptation to water loss, where an organism can survive in an ametabolic state until water returns. Here we report the first comparative analysis examining the genomic background of extreme desiccation tolerance, which is exclusively found in larvae of the only anhydrobiotic insect, Polypedilum vanderplanki. We compare the genomes of P. vanderplanki and a congeneric desiccation-sensitive midge P. nubifer. We determine that the genome of the anhydrobiotic species specifically contains clusters of multi-copy genes with products that act as molecular shields. In addition, the genome possesses several groups of genes with high similarity to…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Twenty-one novel microsatellite loci for the endangered Florida salt marsh vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus dukecampbelli)

We present 21 microsatellite loci developed for Florida salt marsh voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus dukecampbelli). Microsatellites were identified from single molecule real time sequencing (Pacific Biosciences). We screened 30 loci and identified 21 loci as suitable for genotyping. We screened 17 individuals from Long Cabbage Key, and 3 individuals from an unnamed island. There was no significant departure from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium or linkage equilibrium. Fifteen of the 21 loci were variable, with overall observed heterozygosity averaging 0.39, and a mean number of alleles of 3.14. Linkage disequilibrium estimate of Ne was 10.7 (95 % CI 6.1–20.1). These markers will be useful…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain PY79.

Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive soil-dwelling and endospore-forming bacterium in the phylum Firmicutes. B. subtilis strain PY79 is a prototrophic laboratory strain that has been highly used for studying a wide variety of cellular pathways. Here, we announce the complete whole-genome sequence of B. subtilis PY79.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

StatsDB: platform-agnostic storage and understanding of next generation sequencing run metrics.

Modern sequencing platforms generate enormous quantities of data in ever-decreasing amounts of time. Additionally, techniques such as multiplex sequencing allow one run to contain hundreds of different samples. With such data comes a significant challenge to understand its quality and to understand how the quality and yield are changing across instruments and over time. As well as the desire to understand historical data, sequencing centres often have a duty to provide clear summaries of individual run performance to collaborators or customers. We present StatsDB, an open-source software package for storage and analysis of next generation sequencing run metrics. The system…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Implementation and data analysis of Tn-seq, whole genome resequencing, and single-molecule real time sequencing for bacterial genetics.

Few discoveries have been more transformative to the biological sciences than the development of DNA sequencing technologies. The rapid advancement of sequencing and bioinformatics tools has revolutionized bacterial genetics, deepening our understanding of model and clinically relevant organisms. Although application of newer sequencing technologies to studies in bacterial genetics is increasing, the implementation of DNA sequencing technologies and development of the bioinformatics tools required for analyzing the large data sets generated remains a challenge for many. In this minireview, we have chosen to summarize three sequencing approaches that are particularly useful for bacterial genetics. We provide resources for scientists new…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole-genome sequences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis TB282 and TB284, a widespread and a unique strain, respectively, identified in a previous study of tuberculosis transmission in central Los Angeles, California, USA.

We report here the genome sequences of two Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates previously identified in central Los Angeles, CA, in the 1990s using a PacBio platform. Isolate TB282 represents a large-cluster strain that caused 27% of the tuberculosis cases, while TB284 represents a strain that caused disease in only one patient. Copyright © 2017 Zhang and Yang.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Neurotrophin biology at NGF 2016: From fundamental science to clinical applications.

In 1986, members of the growing neurotrophin community came together to honor the scientific contributions (and 77th birth- day) of Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini. The celebration took the form of a conference dedicated to the field birthed by Dr. Levi-Montalcini’s discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF), for which she shared the Nobel Prize later that year with Stanley Cohen. The meeting proved to be a great success, and eventually became an ongoing series. The NGF 2016 meeting, held at the beautiful Asilomar conference cen- ter in Monterey, California, was the 13th meeting in this series, and marked the 30th anniversary of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A murine herpesvirus closely related to ubiquitous human herpesviruses causes T-cell depletion.

The human roseoloviruses human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), HHV-6B, and HHV-7 comprise the Roseolovirus genus of the human Betaherpesvirinae subfamily. Infections with these viruses have been implicated in many diseases; however, it has been challenging to establish infections with roseoloviruses as direct drivers of pathology, because they are nearly ubiquitous and display species-specific tropism. Furthermore, controlled study of infection has been hampered by the lack of experimental models, and until now, a mouse roseolovirus has not been identified. Herein we describe a virus that causes severe thymic necrosis in neonatal mice, characterized by a loss of CD4(+) T cells. These phenotypes…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The pathogenic potential of Proteus mirabilis is enhanced by other uropathogens during polymicrobial uirinary tract infection.

Urinary catheter use is prevalent in health care settings, and polymicrobial colonization by urease-positive organisms, such as Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii, commonly occurs with long-term catheterization. We previously demonstrated that coinfection with P. mirabilis and P. stuartii increased overall urease activity in vitro and disease severity in a model of urinary tract infection (UTI). In this study, we expanded these findings to a murine model of catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI), delineated the contribution of enhanced urease activity to coinfection pathogenesis, and screened for enhanced urease activity with other common CAUTI pathogens. In the UTI model, mice coinfected with the two…

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