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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic analysis of the multi-drug-resistant clinical isolate Myroides odoratimimus PR63039.

Myroides odoratimimus (M. odoratimimus) has been gradually implicated as an important nosocomial pathogen that poses a serious health threat to immunocompromised patients owing to its multi-drug resistance. However, the resistance mechanism is currently unclear. To clarify the antibiotic resistance and infectivity mechanisms of M. odoratimimus, whole genome sequencing was performed on the multi-drug-resistant M. odoratimimus strain PR63039. The genome sequence was completed with single molecule real-time (SMRT) technologies. Then, annotation was performed using RAST and IMG-ER. A number of databases and software programs were used to analyze the genomic characteristics, including GC-Profile, ISfinder, CG viewer, ARDB, CARD, ResFinder, the VFDB…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Evolutionary origins of the emergent ST796 clone of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium.

From early 2012, a novel clone of vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (assigned the multi locus sequence type ST796) was simultaneously isolated from geographically separate hospitals in south eastern Australia and New Zealand. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of Ef_aus0233, a representative ST796 E. faecium isolate. We used PacBio single molecule real-time sequencing to establish a high quality, fully assembled genome comprising a circular chromosome of 2,888,087 bp and five plasmids. Comparison of Ef_aus0233 to other E. faecium genomes shows Ef_aus0233 is a member of the epidemic hospital-adapted lineage and has evolved from an ST555-like ancestral progenitor by the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Analysis of serial isolates of mcr-1-positive Escherichia coli reveals a highly active ISApl1 transposon.

The emergence of a transferable colistin resistance gene (mcr-1) is of global concern. The insertion sequence ISApl1 is a key component in the mobilization of this gene, but its role remains poorly understood. Six Escherichia coli isolates were cultured from the same patient over the course of 1 month in Germany and the United States after a brief hospitalization in Bahrain for an unconnected illness. Four carried mcr-1 as determined by real-time PCR, but two were negative. Two additional mcr-1-negative E. coli isolates were collected during follow-up surveillance 9 months later. All isolates were analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS). WGS…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Prevalence of colistin resistance gene (mcr-1) containing Enterobacteriaceae in feces of patients attending a tertiary care hospital and detection of a mcr-1 containing, colistin susceptible E. coli.

The emergence of the plasmid-mediated mcr colistin resistance gene in the community poses a potential threat for treatment of patients, especially when hospitalized. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of all currently known mcr mediated colistin resistance gene in fecal samples of patients attending a tertiary care hospital. From November 2014 until July 2015, fecal samples of patients attending the Leiden University Medical Center were collected and screened for presence of mcr using real-time PCR. Two of 576 patients were positive for mcr-1, resulting in a prevalence of 0.35%, whereas no mcr-2 was found. One of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Zinc resistance within swine associated methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Isolates in the USA is associated with MLST lineage.

Zinc resistance in livestock-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) sequence type (ST) 398 is primarily mediated by the czrC gene co-located with the mecA gene, encoding methicillin resistance, within the type V SCCmec element. Because czrC and mecA are located within the same mobile genetic element, it has been suggested that the use of in feed zinc as an antidiarrheal agent has the potential to contribute to the emergence and spread of MRSA in swine through increased selection pressure to maintain the SCCmec element in isolates obtained from pigs. In this study we report the prevalence of the czrC gene…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Expanding landscapes of the diversified mcr-1-bearing plasmid reservoirs.

Polymyxin is a cationic polypeptide antibiotic that can disrupt bacterial cell membrane by interacting with its lipopolysaccharide molecules and is used as a last resort drug against lethal infections by the carbapenem-resistant superbugs (like NDM-1). However, global discovery of the MCR-1 colistin resistance dramatically challenges the newly renewed interest in colistin for clinical use.The mcr-1-harboring plasmids were acquired from swine and human Escherichia coli isolated in China, from 2015 to 2016, and subjected to Illumina PacBio RSII and Hi-Seq2000 for full genome sequencing. PCR was applied to close the gap of the assembled contigs. Ori-Finder was employed to predict the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Phenotypic and genomic comparison of Mycobacterium aurum and surrogate model species to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: implications for drug discovery.

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and represents one of the major challenges facing drug discovery initiatives worldwide. The considerable rise in bacterial drug resistance in recent years has led to the need of new drugs and drug regimens. Model systems are regularly used to speed-up the drug discovery process and circumvent biosafety issues associated with manipulating M. tuberculosis. These include the use of strains such as Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium marinum that can be handled in biosafety level 2 facilities, making high-throughput screening feasible. However, each of these model species have their own limitations.We report and describe the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Candida auris for the clinical microbiology laboratory: Not your grandfather’s Candida species

Candida auris is a newly emerging species that was first identified in Asia in 2009 but has rapidly spread across the world. C. auris differs from most other Candida species in that antifungal resistance is the norm rather than the exception, it is a commensal of human skin rather than the human gut, and it can be easily transmitted from person to person in a health care setting. This review discusses the emergence of C. auris, global epidemiology, identification, antifungal susceptibility testing, and precautions to be taken when it is identified from a patient specimen.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomics-enabled analysis of the emergent disease cotton bacterial blight.

Cotton bacterial blight (CBB), an important disease of (Gossypium hirsutum) in the early 20th century, had been controlled by resistant germplasm for over half a century. Recently, CBB re-emerged as an agronomic problem in the United States. Here, we report analysis of cotton variety planting statistics that indicate a steady increase in the percentage of susceptible cotton varieties grown each year since 2009. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strains from the current outbreak cluster with race 18 Xanthomonas citri pv. malvacearum (Xcm) strains. Illumina based draft genomes were generated for thirteen Xcm isolates and analyzed along with 4 previously published Xcm…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome diversity and evolution in the budding yeasts (Saccharomycotina).

Considerable progress in our understanding of yeast genomes and their evolution has been made over the last decade with the sequencing, analysis, and comparisons of numerous species, strains, or isolates of diverse origins. The role played by yeasts in natural environments as well as in artificial manufactures, combined with the importance of some species as model experimental systems sustained this effort. At the same time, their enormous evolutionary diversity (there are yeast species in every subphylum of Dikarya) sparked curiosity but necessitated further efforts to obtain appropriate reference genomes. Today, yeast genomes have been very informative about basic mechanisms of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Distinct mechanisms of acquisition of mcr-1 -bearing plasmid by Salmonella strains recovered from animals and food samples.

Since the report of its discovery in E. coli in late 2015, the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, has been detected in various bacterial species in clinical setting and various environmental niches. However, the transmission mechanisms of this gene in Salmonella is less defined. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive study to characterize the genetic features of mcr-1-positive Salmonella strains isolated from animals and foods. Our data revealed that Salmonella recovered from animals and food specimens exhibited highly different PFGE patterns, and acquired mcr-1-encoding plasmids via different mechanism. Plasmids harboring mcr-1 in Salmonella food isolates were all conjugative and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Analysis of resistance genes in pan-resistant Myroides odoratimimus clinical strain PR63039 using whole genome sequencing.

To clarify the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of Myroides odoratimimus, pan-resistant M. odoratimimus strain PR63039 was isolated and its genome sequenced and analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and the Phoenix-100 Automated Microbiology System with a NMIC/ID-4 panel including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, polypeptides, quinolones, sulfonamides, chloramphenicols, and tetracyclines. Single-molecule real-time whole genome sequencing was conducted using the PacBio RSII system, and genome annotation was performed using RAST and IMG ER. To characterize the genome features, a number of databases and software programs, including GC-Profile, CG viewer, the VFDB database, ISfinder, RADB, CARD, ResFinder, and PHAST, were used.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genetic analysis of a Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolate accompanying four plasmids carrying mcr-1, ESBL and other resistance genes in China

One mcr-1-carrying Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana strain D90, was identified from 1320 Salmonella enterica isolates from poultry slaughterhouse in 2012 in China. The objective of this study was to verify the transferability of the mcr-1 gene and also completely characterize the sequence of the strain at the whole-genome level. Broth matting assays were carried out to detect the transferability and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of S. enterica serovar Indiana D90 was performed using the PacBio RS II system. Open reading frames were assigned using Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (RAST) and analysed by BLASTn and BLASTp. Salmonella Pathogenisity Islands (SPIs) were…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genetic characterization of blaNDM-harboring plasmids in carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli from Myanmar.

The bacterial enzyme New Delhi metallo-ß-lactamase hydrolyzes almost all ß-lactam antibiotics, including carbapenems, which are drugs of last resort for severe bacterial infections. The spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae that carry the New Delhi metallo-ß-lactamase gene, blaNDM, poses a serious threat to public health. In this study, we genetically characterized eight carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a tertiary care hospital in Yangon, Myanmar. The eight isolates belonged to five multilocus-sequence types and harbored multiple antimicrobial-resistance genes, resulting in resistance against nearly all of the antimicrobial agents tested, except colistin and fosfomycin. Nine plasmids harboring blaNDM genes were identified from these isolates.…

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