fbpx
X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of two Rhodobacter strains.

We report the complete genome sequences of two strains of the Alphaproteobacteria genus Rhodobacter, Rhodobacter blasticus 28/5, the source of the commercially available enzyme RsaI, and a new isolate of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. Both strains contain multiple restriction-modification systems, and their DNA methylation motifs are included in this report.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

The molecular basis for the intramolecular migration (NIH shift) of the carboxyl group during para-hydroxybenzoate catabolism.

The NIH shift is a chemical rearrangement in which a substituent on an aromatic ring undergoes an intramolecular migration, primarily during an enzymatic hydroxylation reaction. The molecular mechanism for the NIH shift of a carboxyl group has remained a mystery for 40 years. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanism of the reaction in the conversion of para-hydroxybenzoate (PHB) to gentisate (GA, 2, 5-dihydroxybenzoate). Three genes (phgABC) from the PHB utilizer Brevibacillus laterosporus PHB-7a encode enzymes (p-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA ligase, p-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA hydroxylase and gentisyl-CoA thioesterase, respectively) catalyzing the conversion of PHB to GA via a route involving CoA thioester formation, hydroxylation concomitant with…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete genomic sequence of a novel cold-adapted bacterium, Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from crude oil-contaminated soil.

Planococcus maritimus Y42, isolated from the petroleum-contaminated soil of the Qaidam Basin, can use crude oil as its sole source of carbon and energy at 20 °C. The genome of P. maritimus strain Y42 has been sequenced to provide information on its properties. Genomic analysis shows that the genome of strain Y42 contains one circular DNA chromosome with a size of 3,718,896 bp and a GC content of 48.8%, and three plasmids (329,482; 89,073; and 12,282 bp). Although the strain Y42 did not show a remarkably higher ability in degrading crude oil than other oil-degrading bacteria, the existence of strain Y42 played a…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Identification and genome analysis of Deinococcus actinosclerus SJTR1, a novel 17ß-estradiol degradation bacterium.

Biodegradation with microorganisms is considered as an efficient strategy to remove the environmental pollutants. In this work, Deinococcus actinosclerus SJTR1 isolated from the wastewater was confirmed with great degradation capability to 17ß-estradiol, one typical estrogen chemical. It could degrade nearly 90% of 17ß-estradiol (10 mg/L) in 5 days and transform it into estrone; its degradation kinetics fitted for the first-order kinetic equation. The whole genome sequence of D. actinosclerus SJTR1 was obtained and annotated, containing one chromosome (3,315,586 bp) and four plasmids (ranging from 17,267 bp to 460,244 bp). A total of 3913 CDSs and 73 RNA genes (including 12 rRNA genes, 50 tRNA genes,…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bordetella sp. HZ20 sheds light on the ecological role of bacterium without algal-polysaccharides degrading abilities in the brown seaweed-abundant environment

Bordetella sp. HZ20 was isolated from the surface of brown seaweed (Laminaria japonica) and absence of the abilities to decompose the brown seaweed. The genome of Bordetella sp. HZ20 was sequenced and comprised of one circular chromosome with the size of 4,227,194?bp and DNA G?+?C content of 55.5%. Genomic annotation showed that, Bordetella sp. HZ20 may have chitin degradation related enzymes, heparin-sulfate lyase-like protein and enzymes related to the synthase and utilization of polyhydroxyalkanoate for carbon utilization, nitrate and nitrite reductase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase and glutamine synthetase for nitrogen cycle, polyphosphate kinases (pkk1 and pkk2), the high-affinity phosphate-specific transport…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

BELLA: Berkeley Efficient Long-Read to Long-Read Aligner and Overlapper

De novo assembly is the process of reconstructing genomes from DNA fragments (reads), which may contain redundancy and errors. Longer reads simplify assembly and improve contiguity of the output, but current long-read technologies come with high error rates. A crucial step of de novo genome assembly for long reads consists of finding overlapping reads. We present Berkeley Long-Read to Long-Read Aligner and Overlapper (BELLA), which implement a novel approach to compute overlaps using Sparse Generalized Matrix Multiplication (SpGEMM). We present a probabilistic model which demonstrates the soundness of using short, fixed length k-mers to detect overlaps, avoiding expensive pairwise alignment…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomics and biochemistry investigation on the metabolic pathway of milled wood and alkali lignin-derived aromatic metabolites of Comamonas serinivorans SP-35.

The efficient depolymerization and utilization of lignin are one of the most important goals for the renewable use of lignocelluloses. The degradation and complete mineralization of lignin by bacteria represent a key step for carbon recycling in land ecosystems as well. However, many aspects of this process remain unclear, for example, the complex network of metabolic pathways involved in the degradation of lignin and the catabolic pathway of intermediate aromatic metabolites. To address these subjects, we characterized the deconstruction and mineralization of lignin with milled wood lignin (MWL, the most representative molecule of lignin in its native state) and alkali…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the polymyxin E (colistin)-producing Paenibacillus sp. strain B-LR.

Paenibacillus bacteria are recovered from varied niches, including human lung, rhizosphere, marine sediments, and hemolymph. Paenibacilli can have plant growth-promoting activities and be antibiotic producers. They can produce exopolysaccharides and enzymes of industrial interest. Illumina and PacBio reads were used to produce a complete genome sequence of the colistin producer Paenibacillus sp. strain B-LR.

Read More »

1 55 56 57

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives