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April 1, 2019

Whole-Genome Sequence of an Isogenic Haploid Strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR-2idA30(MATa), Established from the Industrial Diploid Strain IR-2.

We present the draft genome sequence of an isogenic haploid strain, IR-2idA30(MATa), established from Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR-2. Assembly of long reads and previously obtained contigs from the genome of diploid IR-2 resulted in 50 contigs, and the variations and sequencing errors were corrected by short reads. Copyright © 2019 Fujimori et al.

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March 1, 2019

Genome Sequence of the Black Yeast Exophiala lecanii-corni.

The genome sequence of Exophiala lecanii-corni, a melanized dimorphic fungus with the capability of degrading several volatile organic compounds, was sequenced using PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing to assist with understanding the molecular basis of its uncommon morphological and metabolic characteristics. The assembled draft genome is presented here.

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February 1, 2019

Complete Genome Sequence of Malassezia restricta CBS 7877, an Opportunist Pathogen Involved in Dandruff and Seborrheic Dermatitis.

Malassezia restricta, one of the predominant basidiomycetous yeasts present on human skin, is involved in scalp disorders. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the lipophilic Malassezia restricta CBS 7877 strain, which will facilitate the study of the mechanisms underlying its commensal and pathogenic roles within the skin microbiome.

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February 1, 2019

Hybridization is a recurrent evolutionary stimulus in wild yeast speciation.

Hybridization can result in reproductively isolated and phenotypically distinct lineages that evolve as independent hybrid species. How frequently hybridization leads to speciation remains largely unknown. Here we examine the potential recurrence of hybrid speciation in the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus in North America, which comprises two endemic lineages SpB and SpC, and an incipient hybrid species, SpC*. Using whole-genome sequences from more than 300 strains, we uncover the hybrid origin of another group, SpD, that emerged from hybridization between SpC* and one of its parental species, the widespread SpB. We show that SpD has the potential to evolve as a…

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December 1, 2018

Regulation of yeast-to-hyphae transition in Yarrowia lipolytica.

The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica undergoes a morphological transition from yeast-to-hyphal growth in response to environmental conditions. A forward genetic screen was used to identify mutants that reliably remain in the yeast phase, which were then assessed by whole-genome sequencing. All the smooth mutants identified, so named because of their colony morphology, exhibit independent loss of DNA at a repetitive locus made up of interspersed ribosomal DNA and short 10- to 40-mer telomere-like repeats. The loss of repetitive DNA is associated with downregulation of genes with stress response elements (5'-CCCCT-3') and upregulation of genes with cell cycle box (5'-ACGCG-3') motifs in…

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October 1, 2018

Variation graph toolkit improves read mapping by representing genetic variation in the reference.

Reference genomes guide our interpretation of DNA sequence data. However, conventional linear references represent only one version of each locus, ignoring variation in the population. Poor representation of an individual's genome sequence impacts read mapping and introduces bias. Variation graphs are bidirected DNA sequence graphs that compactly represent genetic variation across a population, including large-scale structural variation such as inversions and duplications. Previous graph genome software implementations have been limited by scalability or topological constraints. Here we present vg, a toolkit of computational methods for creating, manipulating, and using these structures as references at the scale of the human genome.…

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October 1, 2018

Rationally designed perturbation factor drives evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for industrial application.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with favorable characteristics are preferred for application in industries. However, the current ability to reprogram a yeast cell on the genome scale is limited due to the complexity of yeast ploids. In this study, a method named genome replication engineering-assisted continuous evolution (GREACE) was proved efficient in engineering S. cerevisiae with different ploids. Through iterative cycles of culture coupled with selection, GREACE could continuously improve the target traits of yeast by accumulating beneficial genetic modification in genome. The application of GREACE greatly improved the tolerance of yeast against acetic acid compared with their parent strain. This method…

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October 1, 2018

Genome analysis of the yeast M14, an industrial brewing yeast strain widely used in China

The lager brewing yeast M14 is the most widely used yeast strain in the high gravity brewing process in China. To investigate the characteristics of this strain, the genome of the yeast M14 was sequenced and the genome annotation information is presented in this study. The current assembly contained 133 scaffolds and its total size was around 23?Mb with a GC content of 38.98%. The brewing yeast M14 is a hybrid Saccharomyces cerevisiae?×?Saccharomyces uvarum at the genomic level and its genome is comprised of one circular mitochondrial genome originating from S. uvarum. Furthermore, the functions of the 9,796 protein coding…

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September 12, 2018

Traditional Norwegian kveik are a genetically distinct group of domesticated Saccharomyces cerevisiae brewing yeasts.

The widespread production of fermented food and beverages has resulted in the domestication of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts specifically adapted to beer production. While there is evidence beer yeast domestication was accelerated by industrialization of beer, there also exists a farmhouse brewing culture in western Norway which has passed down yeasts referred to as kveik for generations. This practice has resulted in ale yeasts which are typically highly flocculant, phenolic off flavor negative (POF-), and exhibit a high rate of fermentation, similar to previously characterized lineages of domesticated yeast. Additionally, kveik yeasts are reportedly high-temperature tolerant, likely due to the traditional…

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September 12, 2018

Ancestral admixture and structural mutation define global biodiversity in fission yeast

Mutation and recombination are key evolutionary processes governing phenotypic variation and reproductive isolation. We here demonstrate that biodiversity within all globally known strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe arose through admixture between two ancestral lineages. Initial hybridization occurred ~20 sexual outcrossing generations ago consistent with recent, human-induced migration at the onset of intensified transcontinental trade. Species-wide phenotypic variation was explained near-exclusively by strain-specific arrangements of alternating ancestry components with evidence for transgressive segregation. Reproductive compatibility between strains was likewise predicted by the degree of shared ancestry. Over 800 structural mutations segregating at low frequency had overall little effect on the introgression landscape.…

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September 1, 2018

Ring synthetic chromosome V SCRaMbLE.

Structural variations (SVs) exert important functional impacts on biological phenotypic diversity. Here we show a ring synthetic yeast chromosome V (ring_synV) can be used to continuously generate complex genomic variations and improve the production of prodeoxyviolacein (PDV) by applying Synthetic Chromosome Recombination and Modification by LoxP-mediated Evolution (SCRaMbLE) in haploid yeast cells. The SCRaMbLE of ring_synV generates aneuploid yeast strains with increased PDV productivity, and we identify aneuploid chromosome I, III, VI, XII, XIII, and ring_synV. The neochromosome of SCRaMbLEd ring_synV generated more unbalanced forms of variations, including duplication, insertions, and balanced forms of translocations and inversions than its linear…

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September 1, 2018

Approximate, simultaneous comparison of microbial genome architectures via syntenic anchoring of quiver representations

Motivation A long-standing limitation in comparative genomic studies is the dependency on a reference genome, which hinders the spectrum of genetic diversity that can be identified across a population of organisms. This is especially true in the microbial world where genome architectures can significantly vary. There is therefore a need for computational methods that can simultaneously analyze the architectures of multiple genomes without introducing bias from a reference. Results In this article, we present Ptolemy: a novel method for studying the diversity of genome architectures—such as structural variation and pan-genomes—across a collection of microbial assemblies without the need of a…

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August 1, 2018

Creating a functional single-chromosome yeast.

Eukaryotic genomes are generally organized in multiple chromosomes. Here we have created a functional single-chromosome yeast from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid cell containing sixteen linear chromosomes, by successive end-to-end chromosome fusions and centromere deletions. The fusion of sixteen native linear chromosomes into a single chromosome results in marked changes to the global three-dimensional structure of the chromosome due to the loss of all centromere-associated inter-chromosomal interactions, most telomere-associated inter-chromosomal interactions and 67.4% of intra-chromosomal interactions. However, the single-chromosome and wild-type yeast cells have nearly identical transcriptome and similar phenome profiles. The giant single chromosome can support cell life, although this…

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August 1, 2018

Whole genome sequencing, de novo assembly and phenotypic profiling for the new budding yeast species Saccharomyces jurei.

Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex consist of yeast species, which are not only important in the fermentation industry but are also model systems for genomic and ecological analysis. Here, we present the complete genome assemblies of Saccharomyces jurei, a newly discovered Saccharomyces sensu stricto species from high altitude oaks. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analysis revealed that S. jurei is more closely related to S. mikatae, than S. cerevisiae, and S. paradoxus The karyotype of S. jurei presents two reciprocal chromosomal translocations between chromosome VI/VII and I/XIII when compared to the S. cerevisiae genome. Interestingly, while the rearrangement I/XIII is unique to S.…

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July 31, 2018

Tracing the de novo origin of protein-coding genes in yeast.

De novo genes are very important for evolutionary innovation. However, how these genes originate and spread remains largely unknown. To better understand this, we rigorously searched for de novo genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C and examined their spread and fixation in the population. Here, we identified 84 de novo genes in S. cerevisiae S288C since the divergence with their sister groups. Transcriptome and ribosome profiling data revealed at least 8 (10%) and 28 (33%) de novo genes being expressed and translated only under specific conditions, respectively. DNA microarray data, based on 2-fold change, showed that 87% of the de novo genes…

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