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May 6, 2019

A High-Quality Genome Assembly from a Single, Field collected Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) using the PacBio Sequel II System

A high-quality reference genome is an essential tool for applied and basic research on arthropods. Long-read sequencing technologies may be used to generate more complete and contiguous genome assemblies than alternate technologies, however, long-read methods have historically had greater input DNA requirements and higher costs than next generation sequencing, which are barriers to their use on many samples. Here, we present a 2.3 Gb de novo genome assembly of a field-collected adult female Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) using a single PacBio SMRT Cell. The Spotted Lanternfly is an invasive species recently discovered in the northeastern United States, threatening to damage…

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May 1, 2019

Comparative analysis of proteomic and metabolomic profiles of different species of Paris.

An extract prepared from species of Paris is the most widely consumed herbal product in China. The genus Paris includes a variety of genotypes with different medicinal component contents but only two are defined as official sources. Closely related species have different medicinal properties because of differential expression of proteins and metabolites. To better understand the molecular basis of these differences, we examined proteomic and metabolomic changes in rhizomes of P. polyphylla var. chinensis, P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis, and P. fargesii var. fargesii using a technique known as sequential window acquisition of all theoretical mass spectra as well as gas…

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May 1, 2019

Updated annotation of the wild strawberry Fragaria vesca V4 genome

The diploid strawberry Fragaria vesca serves as an ideal model plant for cultivated strawberry (Fragaria× ananassa, 8x) and the Rosaceae family. The F. vesca genome was initially published in 2011 using older technologies. Recently, a new and greatly improved F. vesca genome, designated V4, was published. However, the number of annotated genes is remarkably reduced in V4 (28,588 genes) compared to the prior annotations (32,831 to 33,673 genes). Additionally, the annotation of V4 (v4.0.a1) implements a new nomenclature for gene IDs (FvH4_XgXXXXX), rather than the previous nomenclature (geneXXXXX). Hence, further improvement of the V4 genome annotation and assigning gene expression…

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May 1, 2019

The genome of cultivated peanut provides insight into legume karyotypes, polyploid evolution and crop domestication.

High oil and protein content make tetraploid peanut a leading oil and food legume. Here we report a high-quality peanut genome sequence, comprising 2.54?Gb with 20 pseudomolecules and 83,709 protein-coding gene models. We characterize gene functional groups implicated in seed size evolution, seed oil content, disease resistance and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. The peanut B subgenome has more genes and general expression dominance, temporally associated with long-terminal-repeat expansion in the A subgenome that also raises questions about the A-genome progenitor. The polyploid genome provided insights into the evolution of Arachis hypogaea and other legume chromosomes. Resequencing of 52 accessions suggests that…

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May 1, 2019

The genome sequence of segmental allotetraploid peanut Arachis hypogaea.

Like many other crops, the cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is of hybrid origin and has a polyploid genome that contains essentially complete sets of chromosomes from two ancestral species. Here we report the genome sequence of peanut and show that after its polyploid origin, the genome has evolved through mobile-element activity, deletions and by the flow of genetic information between corresponding ancestral chromosomes (that is, homeologous recombination). Uniformity of patterns of homeologous recombination at the ends of chromosomes favors a single origin for cultivated peanut and its wild counterpart A. monticola. However, through much of the genome, homeologous recombination…

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May 1, 2019

Germline murine immunoglobulin IGHV genes in wild-derived and classical inbred strains: a comparison

To better understand the subspecies origin of antibody genes in classical inbred mouse strains, the IGH gene loci of four wild-derived mouse strains were explored by analysis of VDJ gene rearrangements. A total of 341 unique IGHV gene sequences were inferred in the wild-derived strains, including 247 sequences that have not previously been reported. The genes of the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) strain were also documented, and all but one of the 84 inferred NOD IGHV genes have previously been observed in C57BL/6 mice. This is surprising because the Swiss mouse-derived NOD strain and the C57BL/6 strain have no known shared…

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April 23, 2019

Application Brief: Structural variant detection using whole genome sequencing – Best Practices

With the Sequel II System powered by Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing technology and SMRT Link v7.0, you can affordably and effectively detect structural variants (SVs), copy number variants, and large indels ranging in size from tens to thousands of base pairs. PacBio long-read whole genome sequencing comprehensively resolves variants in an individual with high precision and recall. For population genetics and pedigree studies, joint calling powers rapid discovery of common variants within a sample cohort.

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April 23, 2019

Application Brief: Whole genome sequencing for de novo assembly – Best Practices

Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing on the Sequel II System enables easy and affordable generation of high-quality de novo assemblies of even the most complex genomes. With megabase-size contig N50s, consensus accuracies >99.99%, and tools for phasing haplotypes you can capture undetected SNVs, fully intact genes, and regulatory regions embedded in complex structures that fragmented draft genomes often miss.

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April 15, 2019

Application Note: Low DNA input workflow considerations for de novo genome assembly

Obtaining plant and animal genomes with the highest accuracy and contiguity is extremely important when exploring the functional impact of genetic diversity. A comprehensive view of the genome provides power to capture undetected SNVs, fully intact genes, and regulatory regions embedded in complex structures that fragmented draft genomes often miss. Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing has become the gold standard for easy and affordable generation of high-quality de novo genome assemblies of even the most complex plant and animal genomes.

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April 1, 2019

SMRT sequencing of the full-length transcriptome of the Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica).

It is widely known that transcriptional diversity contributes greatly to biological regulation in eukaryotes. With the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, several studies on RNA sequencing have considerably improved our understanding of transcriptome complexity. However, obtaining full-length (FL) transcripts remains a considerable challenge because of difficulties in short read-based assembly. In the present study, single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing and NGS were combined to generate the complete and FL transcriptome of Manis javanica. The results provide a comprehensive set of reference transcripts and hence contribute to the improved annotation of the M. javanica genome. We obtained 45,530 high-confidence transcripts from…

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April 1, 2019

Full-length transcriptome analysis of Litopenaeus vannamei reveals transcript variants involved in the innate immune system.

To better understand the immune system of shrimp, this study combined PacBio isoform sequencing (Iso-Seq) and Illumina paired-end short reads sequencing methods to discover full-length immune-related molecules of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. A total of 72,648 nonredundant full-length transcripts (unigenes) were generated with an average length of 2545 bp from five main tissues, including the hepatopancreas, cardiac stomach, heart, muscle, and pyloric stomach. These unigenes exhibited a high annotation rate (62,164, 85.57%) when compared against NR, NT, Swiss-Prot, Pfam, GO, KEGG and COG databases. A total of 7544 putative long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) were detected and 1164 nonredundant…

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April 1, 2019

The conservation of polyol transporter proteins and their involvement in lichenized Ascomycota.

In lichen symbiosis, polyol transfer from green algae is important for acquiring the fungal carbon source. However, the existence of polyol transporter genes and their correlation with lichenization remain unclear. Here, we report candidate polyol transporter genes selected from the genome of the lichen-forming fungus (LFF) Ramalina conduplicans. A phylogenetic analysis using characterized polyol and monosaccharide transporter proteins and hypothetical polyol transporter proteins of R. conduplicans and various ascomycetous fungi suggested that the characterized yeast' polyol transporters form multiple clades with the polyol transporter-like proteins selected from the diverse ascomycetous taxa. Thus, polyol transporter genes are widely conserved among Ascomycota, regardless…

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