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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Genetic and biochemical characterization of 5-hydroxypicolinic acid metabolism in Alcaligenes faecalis JQ135.

5-Hydroxypicolinic acid (5HPA), a natural pyridine derivative, is microbially degraded in the environment. However, the physiological, biochemical, and genetic foundations of the 5HPA metabolism remain unknown. In this study, an operon (hpa), responsible for 5HPA degradation, was cloned from Alcaligenes faecalis JQ135. HpaM was a monocomponent FAD-dependent monooxygenase and shared low identity (only 28-31%) with reported monooxygenases. HpaM catalyzed the ortho decarboxylative hydroxylation of 5HPA, generating 2,5-dihydroxypyridine (2,5DHP). The monooxygenase activity of HpaM was FAD and NADH-dependent. The apparent Km values of HpaM for 5HPA and NADH were 45.4 µM and 37.8 µM, respectively. The genes hpaX, hpaD, and hpaF…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Comparative genomics of degradative Novosphingobium strains with special reference to the microcystin-degrading Novosphingobium sp. THN1

Bacteria in genus Novosphingobium associated with biodegradation of substrates are prevalent in environments such as lakes, soil, sea, wood and sediments. To better understand the characteristics linked to their wide distribution and metabolic versatility, we report the whole genome sequence of Novosphingobium sp. THN1, a microcystin-degrading strain previously isolated by Jiang et al. (2011) from cyanobacteria-blooming water samples from Lake Taihu, China. We performed a genomic comparison analysis of Novosphingobium sp. THN1 with 21 other degradative Novosphingobium strains downloaded from GenBank. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using 16S rRNA genes, core genes, protein-coding sequences, and average nucleotide identity of whole genomes.…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Genome sequence and metabolic analysis of a fluoranthene-degrading strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa DN1.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa DN1, isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil, showed excellent degradation ability toward diverse polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Many studies have been done to improve its degradation ability. However, the molecular mechanisms of PAHs degradation in DN1 strain are unclear. In this study, the whole genome of DN1 strain was sequenced and analyzed. Its genome contains 6,641,902 bp and encodes 6,684 putative open reading frames (ORFs), which has the largest genome in almost all the comparative Pseudomonas strains. Results of gene annotation showed that this strain harbored over 100 candidate genes involved in PAHs degradation, including those encoding 25 dioxygenases, four…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Functional genomic analysis of phthalate acid ester (PAE) catabolism genes in the versatile PAE-mineralising bacterium Rhodococcus sp. 2G.

Microbial degradation is considered the most promising method for removing phthalate acid esters (PAEs) from polluted environments; however, a comprehensive genomic understanding of the entire PAE catabolic process is still lacking. In this study, the repertoire of PAE catabolism genes in the metabolically versatile bacterium Rhodococcus sp. 2G was examined using genomic, metabolic, and bioinformatic analyses. A total of 4930 coding genes were identified from the 5.6?Mb genome of the 2G strain, including 337 esterase/hydrolase genes and 48 transferase and decarboxylase genes that were involved in hydrolysing PAEs into phthalate acid (PA) and decarboxylating PA into benzoic acid (BA). One…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Condition-dependent co-regulation of genomic clusters of virulence factors in the grapevine trunk pathogen Neofusicoccum parvum.

The ascomycete Neofusicoccum parvum, one of the causal agents of Botryosphaeria dieback, is a destructive wood-infecting fungus and a serious threat to grape production worldwide. The capability to colonize woody tissue, combined with the secretion of phytotoxic compounds, is thought to underlie its pathogenicity and virulence. Here, we describe the repertoire of virulence factors and their transcriptional dynamics as the fungus feeds on different substrates and colonizes the woody stem. We assembled and annotated a highly contiguous genome using single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing. Transcriptome profiling by RNA sequencing determined the genome-wide patterns of expression of virulence factors both in vitro…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Functional Analysis of the Glucan Degradation Locus in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii Reveals Essential Roles of Component Glycoside Hydrolases in Plant Biomass Deconstruction.

The ability to hydrolyze microcrystalline cellulose is an uncommon feature in the microbial world, but it can be exploited for conversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks into biobased fuels and chemicals. Understanding the physiological and biochemical mechanisms by which microorganisms deconstruct cellulosic material is key to achieving this objective. The glucan degradation locus (GDL) in the genomes of extremely thermophilic Caldicellulosiruptor species encodes polysaccharide lyases (PLs), unique cellulose binding proteins (tapirins), and putative posttranslational modifying enzymes, in addition to multidomain, multifunctional glycoside hydrolases (GHs), thereby representing an alternative paradigm for plant biomass degradation compared to fungal or cellulosomal systems. To examine the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Core genome and plasmidome of the quorum-quenching bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis.

Rhodococcus erythropolis is a worldwide-distributed actinobacterium that exhibits a remarkable metabolic versatility illustrated by its ability to degrade complex compounds, such as quorum-sensing signals N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHLs), phenols, sterols and fuel derivatives. Because of its catabolic properties, R. erythropolis strains are proposed as anti-biofouling agents against NAHL-dependent biofilms, biocontrol agents against NAHL-emitting plant pathogens, and bioremediation agents in contaminated waters and soils. Here, we used the PacBio technology to resolve the complete genome sequence of the biocontrol strain R. erythropolis R138. Its genome consisted in a circular chromosome (6,236,862 bp), a linear plasmid pLRE138 (477,915 bp) and a circular plasmid pCRE138 (91,729 bp).…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of oxalate-degrading bacterium Pandoraea vervacti DSM 23571(T).

Pandoraea vervacti DSM 23571(T) is an oxalate metabolizing bacterium isolated from an uncultivated field soil in Mugla, Turkey. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of P. vervacti DSM 23571(T). A complete pathway for degradation of oxalate was revealed from the genome analysis. These data are important to path new opportunities for genetic engineering in the field of biotechnology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Serratia multitudinisentens RB-25(T), a novel chitinolytic bacterium.

Serratia multitudinisentens RB-25(T) (=DSM 28811(T) =LMG 28304(T)) is a newly proposed type strain in the genus of Serratia isolated from a municipal landfill site. Here, we present the complete genome of S. multitudinisentens RB-25(T) which contains a complete chitinase operon and other chitin and N-acetylglucosamine utilisation enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the complete genome sequence of this novel isolate and its chitinase gene discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. strain Rt8.B8, Caldicellulosiruptor sp. strain Wai35.B1, and “Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus”.

The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacteria capable of lignocellulose deconstruction. Currently, complete genome sequences for eleven Caldicellulosiruptor species are available. Here, we report genome sequences for three additional Caldicellulosiruptor species: Rt8.B8 DSM 8990 (New Zealand), Wai35.B1 DSM 8977 (New Zealand), and “Thermoanaerobacter cellulolyticus” strain NA10 DSM 8991 (Japan). Copyright © 2015 Lee et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the alkaline-tolerant Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1.

We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production. Copyright © 2015 Cohen et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence analysis of the naphthenic acid degrading and metal resistant bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, a natural rubber degrading actinomycete isolated from Penang, Malaysia.

Streptomyces sp. strain CFMR 7, which naturally degrades rubber, was isolated from a rubber plantation. Whole genome sequencing and assembly resulted in 2 contigs with total genome size of 8.248 Mb. Two latex clearing protein (lcp) genes which are responsible for rubber degrading activities were identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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