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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Draft genome of Glyptosternon maculatum, an endemic fish from Tibet Plateau.

Mechanisms for high-altitude adaption have attracted widespread interest among evolutionary biologists. Several genome-wide studies have been carried out for endemic vertebrates in Tibet, including mammals, birds, and amphibians. However, little information is available about the adaptive evolution of highland fishes. Glyptosternon maculatum (Regan 1905), also known as Regan or barkley and endemic to the Tibetan Plateau, belongs to the Sisoridae family, order Siluriformes (catfishes). This species lives at an elevation ranging from roughly 2,800 m to 4,200 m. Hence, a high-quality reference genome of G. maculatum provides an opportunity to investigate high-altitude adaption mechanisms of fishes.To obtain a high-quality reference…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Forward genetics by genome sequencing uncovers the central role of the Aspergillus niger goxB locus in hydrogen peroxide induced glucose oxidase expression.

Aspergillus niger is an industrially important source for gluconic acid and glucose oxidase (GOx), a secreted commercially important flavoprotein which catalyses the oxidation of ß-D-glucose by molecular oxygen to D-glucolactone and hydrogen peroxide. Expression of goxC, the GOx encoding gene and the concomitant two step conversion of glucose to gluconic acid requires oxygen and the presence of significant amounts of glucose in the medium and is optimally induced at pH 5.5. The molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of goxC expression are, however, still enigmatic. Genetic studies aimed at understanding GOx induction have indicated the involvement of at least seven complementation groups,…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

The pathogenic mechanisms of Tilletia horrida as revealed by comparative and functional genomics.

Tilletia horrida is a soil-borne, mononucleate basidiomycete fungus with a biotrophic lifestyle that causes rice kernel smut, a disease that is distributed throughout hybrid rice growing areas worldwide. Here we report on the high-quality genome sequence of T. horrida; it is composed of 23.2?Mb that encode 7,729 predicted genes and 6,973 genes supported by RNA-seq. The genome contains few repetitive elements that account for 8.45% of the total. Evolutionarily, T. horrida lies close to the Ustilago fungi, suggesting grass species as potential hosts, but co-linearity was not observed between T. horrida and the barley smut Ustilago hordei. Genes and functions…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Whole-Genome Analysis of an Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strain XDR-BJ83: Insights into the Mechanisms of Resistance of an ST368 Strain from a Tertiary Care Hospital in China.

Acinetobacter baumannii is an important pathogen of nosocomial infections. Nosocomial outbreaks caused by antibiotic-resistant A. baumannii remain a significant challenge. Understanding the antibiotic resistance mechanism of A. baumannii is critical for clinical treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the whole-genome sequence (WGS) of an extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii strain, XDR-BJ83, which was associated with a nosocomial outbreak in a tertiary care hospital of China, and to investigate the antibiotic resistance mechanism of this strain. The WGS of XDR-BJ83 was performed using single-molecule real-time sequencing. The complete genome of XDR-BJ83 consisted of a 4,011,552-bp chromosome and a…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Genomic evidence for asymmetric introgression by sexual selection in the common wall lizard.

Strongly selected characters can be transferred from one lineage to another with limited genetic exchange, resulting in asymmetric introgression and a mosaic genome in the receiving population. However, systems are rarely sufficiently well studied to link the pattern of introgression to its underlying process. Male common wall lizards in western Italy exhibit exaggeration of a suite of sexually selected characters that make them outcompete males from a distantly related lineage that lack these characters. This results in asymmetric hybridization and adaptive introgression of the suite of characters following secondary contact. We developed genomewide markers to infer the demographic history of…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. JP2-270, a rhizosphere isolate of rice with antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani.

Burkholderia sp. JP2-270, a bacterium with a strong ability to inhibit the growth of Rhizoctonia solani, was isolated from the rhizosphere of rice. The phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene revealed that JP2-270 belonged to Burkholderia cepacia complex. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. JP2-270, which consists of three circular chromosomes (Chr1 3,723,585 bp, Chr2 3,274,969 bp, Chr3 1,483,367 bp) and two plasmids (Plas1 15,126 bp, Plas2 428,263 bp). A total of 8193 protein coding genes were predicted in the genome, including 67 tRNA genes, 18 rRNA genes and 4 ncRNA genes. In addition, mutation…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Genome mining for fungal polyketide-diterpenoid hybrids: discovery of key terpene cyclases and multifunctional P450s for structural diversification

A biosynthetic gene cluster for chevalone E (1) and its oxidized derivatives have been identified within the genome of the endophytic fungus Aspergillus versicolor 0312, by a mining strategy targeting a polyke- tide-diterpenoid hybrid molecule. The biosynthetic pathway has been successfully reconstituted in the heterologous fungus Aspergillus oryzae. Interestingly, two P450 monooxygenases, Cle2 and Cle4, were found to transform 1 into seven new analogues including 7 and 8 that possess a unique five-membered lactone ring. Furthermore, the replacement of the terpene cyclase gene with that from another fungus led to the production of sartorypyrone D (11), which has a monocyclic…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Comparative genomic analysis revealed rapid differentiation in the pathogenicity-related gene repertoires between Pyricularia oryzae and Pyricularia penniseti isolated from a Pennisetum grass.

A number of Pyricularia species are known to infect different grass species. In the case of Pyricularia oryzae (syn. Magnaporthe oryzae), distinct populations are known to be adapted to a wide variety of grass hosts, including rice, wheat and many other grasses. The genome sizes of Pyricularia species are typical for filamentous ascomycete fungi [~?40 Mbp for P. oryzae, and ~?45 Mbp for P. grisea]. Genome plasticity, mediated in part by deletions promoted by recombination between repetitive elements [Genome Res 26:1091-1100, 2016, Nat Rev Microbiol 10:417-430,2012] and transposable elements [Annu Rev Phytopathol 55:483-503,2017] contributes to host adaptation. Therefore, comparisons of…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Novel energy conservation strategies and behaviour of Pelotomaculum schinkii driving syntrophic propionate catabolism.

Under methanogenic conditions, short-chain fatty acids are common byproducts from degradation of organic compounds and conversion of these acids is an important component of the global carbon cycle. Due to the thermodynamic difficulty of propionate degradation, this process requires syntrophic interaction between a bacterium and partner methanogen; however, the metabolic strategies and behaviour involved are not fully understood. In this study, the first genome analysis of obligately syntrophic propionate degraders (Pelotomaculum schinkii HH and P. propionicicum MGP) and comparison with other syntrophic propionate degrader genomes elucidated novel components of energy metabolism behind Pelotomaculum propionate oxidation. Combined with transcriptomic examination of…

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