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Sunday, September 22, 2019

The transducer-like protein Tlp12 of Campylobacter jejuni is involved in glutamate and pyruvate chemotaxis.

Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common bacterial causes of food-borne enteritis worldwide. Chemotaxis in C. jejuni is known to be critical for the successful colonization of the host and key for the adaptation of the microbial species to different host environments. In C. jejuni, chemotaxis is regulated by a complex interplay of 13 or even more different chemoreceptors, also known as transducer-like proteins (Tlps). Recently, a novel chemoreceptor gene, tlp12, was described and found to be present in 29.5% of the investigated C. jejuni strains.In this study, we present a functional analysis of Tlp12 with the aid of…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Antagonistic pleiotropy in the bifunctional surface protein FadL (OmpP1) during adaptation of Haemophilus influenzae to chronic lung infection associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Tracking bacterial evolution during chronic infection provides insights into how host selection pressures shape bacterial genomes. The human-restricted opportunistic pathogen nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) infects the lower airways of patients suffering chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and contributes to disease progression. To identify bacterial genetic variation associated with bacterial adaptation to the COPD lung, we sequenced the genomes of 92 isolates collected from the sputum of 13 COPD patients over 1 to 9?years. Individuals were colonized by distinct clonal types (CTs) over time, but the same CT was often reisolated at a later time or found in different patients. Although…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Streptococcus suis contains multiple phase-variable methyltransferases that show a discrete lineage distribution.

Streptococcus suis is a major pathogen of swine, responsible for a number of chronic and acute infections, and is also emerging as a major zoonotic pathogen, particularly in South-East Asia. Our study of a diverse population of S. suis shows that this organism contains both Type I and Type III phase-variable methyltransferases. In all previous examples, phase-variation of methyltransferases results in genome wide methylation differences, and results in differential regulation of multiple genes, a system known as the phasevarion (phase-variable regulon). We hypothesized that each variant in the Type I and Type III systems encoded a methyltransferase with a unique…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Excision-reintegration at a pneumococcal phase-variable restriction-modification locus drives within- and between-strain epigenetic differentiation and inhibits gene acquisition.

Phase-variation of Type I restriction-modification systems can rapidly alter the sequence motifs they target, diversifying both the epigenetic patterns and endonuclease activity within clonally descended populations. Here, we characterize the Streptococcus pneumoniae SpnIV phase-variable Type I RMS, encoded by the translocating variable restriction (tvr) locus, to identify its target motifs, mechanism and regulation of phase variation, and effects on exchange of sequence through transformation. The specificity-determining hsdS genes were shuffled through a recombinase-mediated excision-reintegration mechanism involving circular intermediate molecules, guided by two types of direct repeat. The rate of rearrangements was limited by an attenuator and toxin-antitoxin system homologs that…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Genomic analysis of consecutive Acinetobacter baumannii strains from a single patient.

Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important nosocomial pathogens, and thus it is required to investigate how it disseminate in hospitals and infect patients. We performed whole genome sequencing for 24 A. baumannii strains isolated successively from the blood of a single patient to evaluate whether repeated infections were due to re-infection or relapse infection and to investigate within-host evolution. The whole genome of the first strain, BL1, was sequenced de novo using the PacBio RSII system. BL2-BL24, were sequenced with an Illumina Hiseq4000 and mapped to the genome sequences of BL1. We identified 42 single-nucleotide variations among the…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Microevolution of Neisseria lactamica during nasopharyngeal colonisation induced by controlled human infection.

Neisseria lactamica is a harmless coloniser of the infant respiratory tract, and has a mutually-excluding relationship with the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis. Here we report controlled human infection with genomically-defined N. lactamica and subsequent bacterial microevolution during 26 weeks of colonisation. We find that most mutations that occur during nasopharyngeal carriage are transient indels within repetitive tracts of putative phase-variable loci associated with host-microbe interactions (pgl and lgt) and iron acquisition (fetA promotor and hpuA). Recurrent polymorphisms occurred in genes associated with energy metabolism (nuoN, rssA) and the CRISPR-associated cas1. A gene encoding a large hypothetical protein was often mutated in…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

N6-methyladenine DNA modification in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola genome.

DNA N6-methyladenine (6mA) modifications expand the information capacity of DNA and have long been known to exist in bacterial genomes. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzicola (Xoc) is the causative agent of bacterial leaf streak, an emerging and destructive disease in rice worldwide. However, the genome-wide distribution patterns and potential functions of 6mA in Xoc are largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed the levels and global distribution patterns of 6mA modification in genomic DNA of seven Xoc strains (BLS256, BLS279, CFBP2286, CFBP7331, CFBP7341, L8 and RS105). The 6mA modification was found to be widely distributed across the seven Xoc genomes, accounting…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the cyprodinil-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter johnsonii LXL_C1.

Acinetobacter johnsonii LXL_C1, a cyprodinil degrader, was isolated and purified from cyprodinil-contaminated agricultural soil. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of LXL_C1. The genome comprises one 3,398,706 bp circular chromosome with 41.2% G + C content and one 44,866 bp plasmid. Annotation based on COG and KEGG database analyses revealed genes encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and hydrolase, which can effectively degrade cyprodinil. The complete genome sequence of LXL_C1 can facilitate genetic engineering of a recombinant cyprodinil degrader. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Genome-scale analysis of Acetobacterium bakii reveals the cold adaptation of psychrotolerant acetogens by post-transcriptional regulation.

Acetogens synthesize acetyl-CoA via CO2 or CO fixation, producing organic compounds. Despite their ecological and industrial importance, their transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation has not been systematically studied. With completion of the genome sequence of Acetobacterium bakii (4.28-Mb), we measured changes in the transcriptome of this psychrotolerant acetogen in response to temperature variations under autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. Unexpectedly, acetogenesis genes were highly up-regulated at low temperatures under heterotrophic, as well as autotrophic, growth conditions. To mechanistically understand the transcriptional regulation of acetogenesis genes via changes in RNA secondary structures of 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTR), the primary transcriptome was experimentally determined,…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

A novel probiotic, Lactobacillus johnsonii 456, resists acid and can persist in the human gut beyond the initial ingestion period.

Probiotics are considered to have multiple beneficial effects on the human gastrointestinal tract, including immunomodulation, pathogen inhibition, and improved host nutrient metabolism. However, extensive characterization of these properties is needed to define suitable clinical applications for probiotic candidates. Lactobacillus johnsonii 456 (LBJ 456) was previously demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and anti-genotoxic effects in a mouse model. Here, we characterize its resistance to gastric and bile acids as well as its ability to inhibit gut pathogens and adhere to host mucosa. While bile resistance and in vitro host attachment properties of LBJ 456 were comparable to other tested probiotics, LBJ 456…

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