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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome analysis of Lactobacillus fermentum SK152 from kimchi reveals genes associated with its antimicrobial activity.

Research findings on probiotics highlight their importance in repressing harmful bacteria, leading to more extensive research on their potential applications. We analysed the genome of Lactobacillus fermentum SK152, which was isolated from the Korean traditional fermented vegetable dish kimchi, to determine the genetic makeup and genetic factors responsible for the antimicrobial activity of L. fermentum SK152 and performed a comparative genome analysis with other L. fermentum strains. The genome of L. fermentum SK152 was found to comprise a complete circular chromosome of 2092 273 bp, with an estimated GC content of 51.9% and 2184 open reading frames. It consisted of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Hybrid de novo genome assembly and centromere characterization of the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus).

The de novo assembly of repeat-rich mammalian genomes using only high-throughput short read sequencing data typically results in highly fragmented genome assemblies that limit downstream applications. Here, we present an iterative approach to hybrid de novo genome assembly that incorporates datasets stemming from multiple genomic technologies and methods. We used this approach to improve the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) genome from early draft status to a near chromosome-scale assembly.We used a combination of advanced genomic technologies to iteratively resolve conflicts and super-scaffold the M. murinus genome.We improved the M. murinus genome assembly to a scaffold N50 of 93.32 Mb.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Transcriptional profiling the 150 kb linear megaplasmid of Borrelia turicatae suggests a role in vector colonization and initiating mammalian infection.

Adaptation is key for survival as vector-borne pathogens transmit between the arthropod and vertebrate, and temperature change is an environmental signal inducing alterations in gene expression of tick-borne spirochetes. While plasmids are often associated with adaptation, complex genomes of relapsing fever spirochetes have hindered progress in understanding the mechanisms of vector colonization and transmission. We utilized recent advances in genome sequencing to generate the most complete version of the Borrelia turicatae 150 kb linear megaplasmid (lp150). Additionally, a transcriptional analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) in lp150 was conducted and identified regions that were up-regulated during in vitro cultivation at…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Turicibacter sp. strain H121, isolated from the feces of a contaminated germ-free mouse.

Turicibacterbacteria are commonly detected in the gastrointestinal tracts and feces of humans and animals, but their phylogeny, ecological role, and pathogenic potential remain unclear. We present here the first complete genome sequence ofTuricibactersp. strain H121, which was isolated from the feces of a mouse line contaminated following germ-free derivation. Copyright © 2016 Auchtung et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus mitis strain SVGS_061 isolated from a neutropenic patient with viridans group streptococcal shock syndrome.

Streptococcus mitisfrequently causes invasive infections in neutropenic cancer patients, with a subset of patients developing viridans group streptococcal (VGS) shock syndrome. We report here the first complete genome sequence ofS. mitisstrain SVGS_061, which caused VGS shock syndrome, to help elucidate the pathogenesis of severe VGS infection. Copyright © 2016 Petrosyan et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

In this review, we highlight progress in the last year in characterizing known virulence factors like flagella and the Cag type IV secretion system with sophisticated struc- tural and biochemical approaches to yield new insight on the assembly and functions of these critical virulence determinants. Several aspects of Helicobacter pylori physi- ology were newly explored this year and evaluated for their functions during stom- ach colonization, including a fascinating role for the essential protease HtrA in allowing access of H. pylori to the basolateral side of the gastric epithelium through cleavage of the tight junction protein E- cadherin to facilitate…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of herpes simplex virus 2 strain 333.

Herpes simplex virus 2, or human herpesvirus 2, is a ubiquitous human pathogen that causes genital ulcerations and establishes latency in sacral root ganglia. We fully sequenced and manually curated the viral genome sequence of herpes simplex virus 2, strain 333 using Pacific Biosciences and Illumina sequencing technologies.

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