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May 1, 2019

Three phylogenetic groups have driven the recent population expansion of Cryptococcus neoformans.

Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans var. grubii) is an environmentally acquired pathogen causing 181,000 HIV-associated deaths each year. We sequenced 699 isolates, primarily C. neoformans from HIV-infected patients, from 5 countries in Asia and Africa. The phylogeny of C. neoformans reveals a recent exponential population expansion, consistent with the increase in the number of susceptible hosts. In our study population, this expansion has been driven by three sub-clades of the C. neoformans VNIa lineage; VNIa-4, VNIa-5 and VNIa-93. These three sub-clades account for 91% of clinical isolates sequenced in our study. Combining the genome data with clinical information, we find that…

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May 1, 2019

The genome of cultivated peanut provides insight into legume karyotypes, polyploid evolution and crop domestication.

High oil and protein content make tetraploid peanut a leading oil and food legume. Here we report a high-quality peanut genome sequence, comprising 2.54?Gb with 20 pseudomolecules and 83,709 protein-coding gene models. We characterize gene functional groups implicated in seed size evolution, seed oil content, disease resistance and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. The peanut B subgenome has more genes and general expression dominance, temporally associated with long-terminal-repeat expansion in the A subgenome that also raises questions about the A-genome progenitor. The polyploid genome provided insights into the evolution of Arachis hypogaea and other legume chromosomes. Resequencing of 52 accessions suggests that…

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May 1, 2019

The genome sequence of segmental allotetraploid peanut Arachis hypogaea.

Like many other crops, the cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is of hybrid origin and has a polyploid genome that contains essentially complete sets of chromosomes from two ancestral species. Here we report the genome sequence of peanut and show that after its polyploid origin, the genome has evolved through mobile-element activity, deletions and by the flow of genetic information between corresponding ancestral chromosomes (that is, homeologous recombination). Uniformity of patterns of homeologous recombination at the ends of chromosomes favors a single origin for cultivated peanut and its wild counterpart A. monticola. However, through much of the genome, homeologous recombination…

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May 1, 2019

Long-Read Sequencing Emerging in Medical Genetics

The wide implementation of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has revolutionized the field of medical genetics. However, the short read lengths of currently used sequencing approaches pose a limitation for identification of structural variants, sequencing repetitive regions, phasing alleles and distinguishing highly homologous genomic regions. These limitations may significantly contribute to the diagnostic gap in patients with genetic disorders who have undergone standard NGS, like whole exome or even genome sequencing. Now, the emerging long-read sequencing (LRS) technologies may offer improvements in the characterization of genetic variation and regions that are difficult to assess with the currently prevailing NGS approaches. LRS…

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April 25, 2019

Webinar: Long-read sequencing and infectious disease: New insights into longstanding challenges

One of the longstanding challenges in infectious disease has been the lack of high-quality reference genomes. However, developments in genome sequencing are helping researchers overcome this barrier. Recently, highly contiguous genome assemblies of Plasmodium falciparum, Aedes aegypti, and multiple trypanosomes have become available. The number of reference genomes for bacteria that cause infectious disease is similarly expanding rapidly. In this webinar Meredith Ashby discusses how these new resources are already yielding new biological insights into critical questions in infectious disease research, including how parasites evade the immune system add how pathogens are adapting to evolutionary pressures.

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April 23, 2019

Application Brief: Variant detection using whole genome sequencing with HiFi reads – Best Practices

With highly accurate long reads (HiFi reads) from the Sequel II System, powered by Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing technology, you can comprehensively detect variants in a human genome. HiFi reads provide high precision and recall for single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels, structural variants (SVs), and copy number variants (CNVs), including in difficult-to-map repetitive regions.

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April 23, 2019

Application Brief: Structural variant detection using whole genome sequencing – Best Practices

With the Sequel II System powered by Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing technology and SMRT Link v7.0, you can affordably and effectively detect structural variants (SVs), copy number variants, and large indels ranging in size from tens to thousands of base pairs. PacBio long-read whole genome sequencing comprehensively resolves variants in an individual with high precision and recall. For population genetics and pedigree studies, joint calling powers rapid discovery of common variants within a sample cohort.

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April 23, 2019

Application Brief: Whole genome sequencing for de novo assembly – Best Practices

Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing on the Sequel II System enables easy and affordable generation of high-quality de novo assemblies of even the most complex genomes. With megabase-size contig N50s, consensus accuracies >99.99%, and tools for phasing haplotypes you can capture undetected SNVs, fully intact genes, and regulatory regions embedded in complex structures that fragmented draft genomes often miss.

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April 15, 2019

Application Note: Low DNA input workflow considerations for de novo genome assembly

Obtaining plant and animal genomes with the highest accuracy and contiguity is extremely important when exploring the functional impact of genetic diversity. A comprehensive view of the genome provides power to capture undetected SNVs, fully intact genes, and regulatory regions embedded in complex structures that fragmented draft genomes often miss. Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing has become the gold standard for easy and affordable generation of high-quality de novo genome assemblies of even the most complex plant and animal genomes.

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April 1, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Raoultella sp. strain X13, a promising cell factory for the synthesis of CdS quantum dots.

A novel cadmium-resistant bacterium, Raoultella sp. strain X13, recently isolated from heavy metal-contaminated soil, and this strain can synthesize CdS quantum dots using cadmium nitrate [Cd(NO4)2] and l-cysteine. Biomineralization of CdS by strain X13 can efficiently remove cadmium from aqueous solution. To illuminate the molecular mechanisms for the biosynthesis of CdS nanoparticle, the complete genome of Raoultella sp. strain X13 was sequenced. The whole genome sequence comprises a circular chromosome and a circular plasmid. Cysteine desulfhydrase smCSE has been previously found to be associated with the synthesis of CdS quantum dots. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the genome of Raoultella sp.…

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