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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Trypanosoma cruzi strain Bug2148.

Trypanosoma cruzi belongs to the group of mitochondrion-containing eukaryotes and has a highly plastic genome, unusual gene organization, and complex mechanisms for gene expression (polycistronic transcription). We report here the genome sequence of strain Bug2148, the first genomic sequence belonging to cluster TcV, which has been related to vertical transmission. Copyright © 2018 Callejas-Hernández et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis strains recovered from human clinical cases between 1949 and 1995 in the United States.

Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the most commonly isolated foodborne pathogens and is transmitted primarily to humans through consumption of contaminated poultry and poultry products. We are reporting completely closed genome and plasmid sequences of historical S. Enteritidis isolates recovered from humans between 1949 and 1995 in the United States.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

High-quality complete and draft genome sequences for three Escherichia spp. and three Shigella spp. generated with Pacific Biosciences and Illumina sequencing and optical mapping.

Escherichia spp., including E. albertii and E. coli, Shigella dysenteriae, and S. flexneri are causative agents of foodborne disease. We report here reference-level whole-genome sequences of E. albertii (2014C-4356), E. coli (2011C-4315 and 2012C-4431), S. dysenteriae (BU53M1), and S. flexneri (94-3007 and 71-2783).. Copyright © 2018 Schroeder et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli 81009, a representative of the sequence type 131 C1-M27 clade with a multidrug-resistant phenotype.

The sequence type 131 (ST131)-H30 clone is responsible for a significant proportion of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal Escherichia coli infections. Recently, the C1-M27 clade of ST131-H30, associated with blaCTX-M-27, has emerged. The complete genome sequence of E. coli isolate 81009 belonging to this clone, previously used during the development of ST131-specific monoclonal antibodies, is reported here. Copyright © 2018 Mutti et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a type strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, a member of the Mycobacterium abscessus complex.

Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii is a rapidly growing mycobacterial organism for which the taxonomy is unclear. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii type strain. This sequence will provide essential information for future taxonomic and comparative genome studies of these mycobacteria.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

High-quality complete genome sequences of three bovine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O177:H- (fliCH25) isolates harboring virulent stx2 and multiple plasmids.

Shiga toxin-producingEscherichia coli(STEC) bacteria are zoonotic pathogens. We report here the high-quality complete genome sequences of three STEC O177:H- (fliCH25) strains, SMN152SH1, SMN013SH2, and SMN197SH3. The assembled genomes consisted of one optical map-verified circular chromosome for each strain, plus two plasmids for SMN013SH2 and three plasmids for SMN152SH1 and SMN197SH3, respectively. Copyright © 2018 Sheng et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. strain UFRGS-B20, a hydrocarbon degrader.

Bacillus sp. strain UFRGS-B20 was isolated in 2012 from Brazilian land-farming soil contaminated with petrochemical oily sludge. This strain was subjected to hydrocarbon biodegradation tests, showing degradation rates of up to 60%. Here, we present the 6.82-Mb draft genome sequence of the strain, which contains 2,178 proteins with functional assignments.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli ML35.

We report here the complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli strain ML35. We assembled PacBio reads into a single closed contig with 169× mean coverage and then polished this contig using Illumina MiSeq reads, yielding a 4,918,774-bp sequence with 50.8% GC content. Copyright © 2018 Casale et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The odyssey of the ancestral Escherich strain through culture collections: an example of allopatric diversification.

More than a century ago, Theodor Escherich isolated the bacterium that was to become Escherichia coli, one of the most studied organisms. Not long after, the strain began an odyssey and landed in many laboratories across the world. As laboratory culture conditions could be responsible for major changes in bacterial strains, we conducted a genome analysis of isolates of this emblematic strain from different culture collections (England, France, the United States, Germany). Strikingly, many discrepancies between the isolates were observed, as revealed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), the presence of virulence-associated genes, core genome MLST, and single nucleotide polymorphism/indel analyses.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolate UPEC 26-1.

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infections in humans, predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). The diverse genomes of UPEC strains mostly impede disease prevention and control measures. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the whole genome sequence of a highly virulent UPEC strain, namely UPEC 26-1, which was isolated from urine sample of a patient suffering from UTI in Korea. Whole genome analysis showed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 5,329,753 bp, comprising 5064 protein-coding genes, 122 RNA genes (94 tRNA, 22 rRNA and 6 ncRNA genes), and 100 pseudogenes, with an average…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the marine Rhodococcus sp. H-CA8f isolated from Comau fjord in Northern Patagonia, Chile

Rhodococcus sp. H-CA8f was isolated from marine sediments obtained from the Comau fjord, located in Northern Chilean Patagonia. Whole-genome sequencing was achieved using PacBio RS II platform, comprising one closed, complete chromosome of 6,19?Mbp with a 62.45% G?+?C content. The chromosome harbours several metabolic pathways providing a wide catabolic potential, where the upper biphenyl route is described. Also, Rhodococcus sp. H-CA8f bears one linear mega-plasmid of 301?Kbp and 62.34% of G?+?C content, where genomic analyses demonstrated that it is constituted mostly by putative ORFs with unknown functions, representing a novel genetic feature. These genetic characteristics provide relevant insights regarding Chilean…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of multiple-antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus parauberis strain SPOF3K, isolated from diseased olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

Here, we report the complete genome sequence of multiple-antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus parauberis strain SPOF3K, isolated from the kidney of a diseased olive flounder in South Korea in 2013. Sequencing using a PacBio platform yielded a circular chromosome of 2,128,740?bp and a plasmid of 23,538?bp, harboring 2,123 and 24 protein-coding genes, respectively. Copyright © 2018 Lee et al.

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