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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Discovery of chemoautotrophic symbiosis in the giant shipworm Kuphus polythalamia (Bivalvia: Teredinidae) extends wooden-steps theory.

The “wooden-steps” hypothesis [Distel DL, et al. (2000) Nature 403:725-726] proposed that large chemosynthetic mussels found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents descend from much smaller species associated with sunken wood and other organic deposits, and that the endosymbionts of these progenitors made use of hydrogen sulfide from biogenic sources (e.g., decaying wood) rather than from vent fluids. Here, we show that wood has served not only as a stepping stone between habitats but also as a bridge between heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic symbiosis for the giant mud-boring bivalve Kuphus polythalamia This rare and enigmatic species, which achieves the greatest length of any…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Oceanicola sp. strain MCTG156(1a), isolated from a Scottish coastal phytoplankton net sample.

Oceanicola sp. strain MCTG156(1a) was isolated from a phytoplankton net sample collected on the west coast of Scotland and selected based on its ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which comprises 3,881,122 bp with 3,949 genes and an average G+C content of 62.7%. Copyright © 2017 Gutierrez et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequencing and comparative genomics reveal the potential pathogenic mechanism of Cercospora sojina Hara on soybean.

Frogeye leaf spot, caused by Cercospora sojina Hara, is a common disease of soybean in most soybean-growing countries of the world. In this study, we report a high-quality genome sequence of C. sojina by Single Molecule Real-Time sequencing method. The 40.8-Mb genome encodes 11,655 predicated genes, and 8,474 genes are revealed by RNA sequencing. Cercospora sojina genome contains large numbers of gene clusters that are involved in synthesis of secondary metabolites, including mycotoxins and pigments. However, much less carbohydrate-binding module protein encoding genes are identified in C. sojina genome, when compared with other phytopathogenic fungi. Bioinformatics analysis reveals that C.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Feathermoss and epiphytic Nostoc cooperate differently: expanding the spectrum of plant-cyanobacteria symbiosis.

Dinitrogen (N2)-fixation by cyanobacteria in symbiosis with feathermosses is the primary pathway of biological nitrogen (N) input into boreal forests. Despite its significance, little is known about the cyanobacterial gene repertoire and regulatory rewiring needed for the establishment and maintenance of the symbiosis. To determine gene acquisitions and regulatory changes allowing cyanobacteria to form and maintain this symbiosis, we compared genomically closely related symbiotic-competent and -incompetent Nostoc strains using a proteogenomics approach and an experimental set up allowing for controlled chemical and physical contact between partners. Thirty-two gene families were found only in the genomes of symbiotic strains, including some…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomics of early-diverging mushroom-forming fungi provides insights into the origins of lignocellulose decay capabilities.

Evolution of lignocellulose decomposition was one of the most ecologically important innovations in fungi. White-rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes (mushrooms and relatives) are the most effective microorganisms in degrading both cellulose and lignin components of woody plant cell walls (PCW). However, the precise evolutionary origins of lignocellulose decomposition are poorly understood, largely because certain early-diverging clades of Agaricomycetes and its sister group, the Dacrymycetes, have yet to be sampled, or have been undersampled, in comparative genomic studies. Here, we present new genome sequences of ten saprotrophic fungi, including members of the Dacrymycetes and early-diverging clades of Agaricomycetes (Cantharellales, Sebacinales, Auriculariales,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

High-quality draft genome sequence of the Thermus amyloliquefaciens type strain YIM 77409(T) with an incomplete denitrification pathway.

Thermus amyloliquefaciens type strain YIM 77409(T) is a thermophilic, Gram-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium isolated from Niujie Hot Spring in Eryuan County, Yunnan Province, southwest China. In the present study we describe the features of strain YIM 77409(T) together with its genome sequence and annotation. The genome is 2,160,855 bp long and consists of 6 scaffolds with 67.4 % average GC content. A total of 2,313 genes were predicted, comprising 2,257 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes. The genome is predicted to encode a complete glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle. Additionally, a large number of transporters and enzymes for heterotrophy…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Investigation of proposed ladderane biosynthetic genes from anammox bacteria by heterologous expression in E. coli.

Ladderanes are hydrocarbon chains with three or five linearly concatenated cyclobutane rings that are uniquely produced as membrane lipid components by anammox (anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing) bacteria. By virtue of their angle and torsional strain, ladderanes are unusually energetic compounds, and if produced biochemically by engineered microbes, could serve as renewable, high-energy-density jet fuel components. The biochemistry and genetics underlying the ladderane biosynthetic pathway are unknown, however, previous studies have identified a pool of 34 candidate genes from the anammox bacterium, Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, some or all of which may be involved with ladderane fatty acid biosynthesis. The goal of the present study…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

High-quality draft genomes from Thermus caliditerrae YIM 77777 and T. tengchongensis YIM 77401, isolates from Tengchong, China.

The draft genomes of Thermus  tengchongensis YIM 77401 and T. caliditerrae YIM 77777 are 2,562,314 and 2,218,114 bp and encode 2,726 and 2,305 predicted genes, respectively. Gene content and growth experiments demonstrate broad metabolic capacity, including starch hydrolysis, thiosulfate oxidation, arsenite oxidation, incomplete denitrification, and polysulfide reduction. Copyright © 2016 Mefferd et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer sp. PC2, isolated from a nitrogen-fixing root nodule of the legume tree (Khejri) native to the Thar Desert of India.

Ensifer sp. PC2 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a nitrogen-fixing nodule of the tree legume P. cineraria (L.) Druce (Khejri), which is a keystone species that grows in arid and semi-arid regions of the Indian Thar desert. Strain PC2 exists as a dominant saprophyte in alkaline soils of Western Rajasthan. It is fast growing, well-adapted to arid conditions and is able to form an effective symbiosis with several annual crop legumes as well as species of mimosoid trees and shrubs. Here we describe the features of Ensifer sp. PC2, together with genome sequence information…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Large-scale maps of variable infection efficiencies in aquatic Bacteroidetes phage-host model systems.

Microbes drive ecosystem functioning and their viruses modulate these impacts through mortality, gene transfer and metabolic reprogramming. Despite the importance of virus-host interactions and likely variable infection efficiencies of individual phages across hosts, such variability is seldom quantified. Here, we quantify infection efficiencies of 38 phages against 19 host strains in aquatic Cellulophaga (Bacteroidetes) phage-host model systems. Binary data revealed that some phages infected only one strain while others infected 17, whereas quantitative data revealed that efficiency of infection could vary 10 orders of magnitude, even among phages within one population. This provides a baseline for understanding and modeling intrapopulation…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Permanent improved high-quality draft genome sequence of Nocardia casuarinae strain BMG51109, an endophyte of actinorhizal root nodules of Casuarina glauca.

Here, we report the first genome sequence of a Nocardia plant endophyte, N. casuarinae strain BMG51109, isolated from Casuarina glauca root nodules. The improved high-quality draft genome sequence contains 8,787,999 bp with a 68.90% GC content and 7,307 predicted protein-coding genes. Copyright © 2016 Ghodhbane-Gtari et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Application of long sequence reads to improve genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

We and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7. Copyright © 2016 Utturkar et al.

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