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Friday, July 19, 2019

Comprehensive analysis of cancer-associated somatic mutations in class I HLA genes.

Detection of somatic mutations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes using whole-exome sequencing (WES) is hampered by the high polymorphism of the HLA loci, which prevents alignment of sequencing reads to the human reference genome. We describe a computational pipeline that enables accurate inference of germline alleles of class I HLA-A, B and C genes and subsequent detection of mutations in these genes using the inferred alleles as a reference. Analysis of WES data from 7,930 pairs of tumor and healthy tissue from the same patient revealed 298 nonsilent HLA mutations in tumors from 266 patients. These 298 mutations are…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

TCR sequencing of single cells reactive to DQ2.5-glia-a2 and DQ2.5-glia-?2 reveals clonal expansion and epitope-specific V-gene usage.

CD4+ T cells recognizing dietary gluten epitopes in the context of disease-associated human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 molecules are the key players in celiac disease pathogenesis. Here, we conducted a large-scale single-cell paired T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing study to characterize the TCR repertoire for two homologous immunodominant gluten epitopes, DQ2.5-glia-a2 and DQ2.5-glia-?2, in blood of celiac disease patients after oral gluten challenge. Despite sequence similarity of the epitopes, the TCR repertoires are unique but shared several overall features. We demonstrate that clonally expanded T cells dominate the T-cell responses to both epitopes. Moreover, we find V-gene bias of TRAV26,…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Comparative analyses of low, medium and high-resolution HLA typing technologies for human populations

Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) encoding genes are part of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on human chromosome 6. This region is one of the most polymorphic regions in the human genome. Prior knowledge of HLA allelic polymorphisms is clinically important for matching donor and recipient during organ/tissue transplantation. HLA allelic information is also useful in predicting immune responses to various infectious diseases, genetic disorders and autoimmune conditions. India harbors over a billion people and its population is untapped for HLA allelic diversity. In this study, we explored and compared three HLA typing methods for South Indian population, using Sequence-Specific Primers…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Towards precision medicine.

There is great potential for genome sequencing to enhance patient care through improved diagnostic sensitivity and more precise therapeutic targeting. To maximize this potential, genomics strategies that have been developed for genetic discovery – including DNA-sequencing technologies and analysis algorithms – need to be adapted to fit clinical needs. This will require the optimization of alignment algorithms, attention to quality-coverage metrics, tailored solutions for paralogous or low-complexity areas of the genome, and the adoption of consensus standards for variant calling and interpretation. Global sharing of this more accurate genotypic and phenotypic data will accelerate the determination of causality for novel…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Dual redundant sequencing strategy: Full-length gene characterisation of 1056 novel and confirmatory HLA alleles.

The high-throughput department of DKMS Life Science Lab encounters novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles on a daily basis. To characterise these alleles, we have developed a system to sequence the whole gene from 5′- to 3′-UTR for the HLA loci A, B, C, DQB1 and DPB1 for submission to the European Molecular Biology Laboratory – European Nucleotide Archive (EMBL-ENA) and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. Our workflow is based on a dual redundant sequencing strategy. Using shotgun sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq instrument and single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing on a PacBio RS II instrument, we are able to achieve highly…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Single molecule real-time (SMRT®) DNA sequencing of HLA genes at ultra-high resolution from 126 International HLA and Immunogenetics Workshop cell lines.

The hyperpolymorphic HLA genes play important roles in disease and transplantation and act as genetic markers of migration and evolution. A panel of 107 B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs) was established in 1987 at the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop as a resource for the immunogenetics community. These B-LCLs are well characterised and represent diverse ethnicities and HLA haplotypes. Here we have applied Pacific Biosciences’ Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing to HLA type 126 B-LCL, including the 107 IHIW cells, to ultra-high resolution. Amplicon sequencing of full-length HLA class I genes (HLA-A, -B and -C) and partial length HLA class II…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Reference grade characterization of polymorphisms in full-length HLA class I and II genes with short-read sequencing on the Ion PGM system and long-reads generated by Single Molecule, Real-time Sequencing on the PacBio platform

Although NGS technologies fuel advances in high-throughput HLA genotyping methods for identification and classification of HLA genes to assist with precision medicine efforts in disease and transplantation, the efficiency of these methods are impeded by the absence of adequately-characterized high-frequency HLA allele reference sequence databases for the highly polymorphic HLA gene system. Here, we report on producing a comprehensive collection of full-length HLA allele sequences for eight classical HLA loci found in the Japanese population. We augmented the second-generation short read data generated by the Ion Torrent technology with long amplicon spanning consensus reads delivered by the third-generation SMRT sequencing…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Advances in DNA sequencing technologies for high resolution HLA typing.

This communication describes our experience in large-scale G group-level high resolution HLA typing using three different DNA sequencing platforms – ABI 3730 xl, Illumina MiSeq and PacBio RS II. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies, so-called next generation sequencing (NGS), have brought breakthroughs in deciphering the genetic information in all living species at a large scale and at an affordable level. The NGS DNA indexing system allows sequencing multiple genes for large number of individuals in a single run. Our laboratory has adopted and used these technologies for HLA molecular testing services. We found that each sequencing technology has its…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A fault-tolerant method for HLA typing with PacBio data.

Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are critical genes involved in important biomedical aspects, including organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases and infectious diseases. The gene family contains the most polymorphic genes in humans and the difference between two alleles is only a single base pair substitution in many cases. The next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies could be used for high throughput HLA typing but in silico methods are still needed to correctly assign the alleles of a sample. Computer scientists have developed such methods for various NGS platforms, such as Illumina, Roche 454 and Ion Torrent, based on the characteristics of the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The MHC locus and genetic susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases.

In the past 50 years, variants in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, also known as the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), have been reported as major risk factors for complex diseases. Recent advances, including large genetic screens, imputation, and analyses of non-additive and epistatic effects, have contributed to a better understanding of the shared and specific roles of MHC variants in different diseases. We review these advances and discuss the relationships between MHC variants involved in autoimmune and infectious diseases. Further work in this area will help to distinguish between alternative hypotheses for the role of pathogens in autoimmune disease development.

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