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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Draft Genome Sequence of Dicyma pulvinata Strain 414-3, a Mycoparasite of Cladosporium fulvum, Causal Agent of Tomato Leaf Mold.

Dicyma pulvinata strain 414-3, isolated from the surface of a tomato leaf, is a mycoparasitic fungus of Cladosporium fulvum, which causes leaf mold of tomato. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain 414-3, which will contribute to elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in the mycoparasitism.Copyright © 2019 Sushida et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Strain 160527, a Causal Agent of Panama Disease.

Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense is the causal agent of banana Fusarium wilt, also known as Panama disease. Here, we present a high-quality genome sequence of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense strain 160527. The genome assembly is composed of 12 contigs with a total assembly length of 51,139,495?bp (N50 contig length, 4,884,632?bp). Copyright © 2019 Asai et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Draft Genome Sequence of the Wood-Decaying Fungus Xylaria sp. BCC 1067.

Xylaria sp. BCC 1067 is a wood-decaying fungus which is capable of producing lignocellulolytic enzymes. Based on the results of a single-molecule real-time sequencing technology analysis, we present the first draft genome of Xylaria sp. BCC 1067, comprising 54.1?Mb with 12,112 protein-coding genes.Copyright © 2019 Sutheeworapong et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Relative Performance of MinION (Oxford Nanopore Technologies) versus Sequel (Pacific Biosciences) Third-Generation Sequencing Instruments in Identification of Agricultural and Forest Fungal Pathogens.

Culture-based molecular identification methods have revolutionized detection of pathogens, yet these methods are slow and may yield inconclusive results from environmental materials. The second-generation sequencing tools have much-improved precision and sensitivity of detection, but these analyses are costly and may take several days to months. Of the third-generation sequencing techniques, the portable MinION device (Oxford Nanopore Technologies) has received much attention because of its small size and possibility of rapid analysis at reasonable cost. Here, we compare the relative performances of two third-generation sequencing instruments, MinION and Sequel (Pacific Biosciences), in identification and diagnostics of fungal and oomycete pathogens from…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

First Draft Genome Sequence of a Pearl Millet Blast Pathogen, Magnaporthe grisea Strain PMg_Dl, Obtained Using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time and Illumina NextSeq 500 Sequencing.

The first draft genome sequence of the pearl millet blast pathogen Magnaporthe grisea PMg_Dl from India is presented. The genome information of M. grisea will be useful to understand the Magnaporthe speciation, genetic diversity, environmental adaptation, and pathogenic and host range determinants.Copyright © 2019 Prakash et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Whole-Genome Sequence of an Isogenic Haploid Strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR-2idA30(MATa), Established from the Industrial Diploid Strain IR-2.

We present the draft genome sequence of an isogenic haploid strain, IR-2idA30(MATa), established from Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR-2. Assembly of long reads and previously obtained contigs from the genome of diploid IR-2 resulted in 50 contigs, and the variations and sequencing errors were corrected by short reads. Copyright © 2019 Fujimori et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Resequencing the Genome of Malassezia restricta Strain KCTC 27527.

The draft genome sequence of Malassezia restricta KCTC 27527, a clinical isolate from a patient with dandruff, was previously reported. Using the PacBio Sequel platform, we completed and reannotated the genome of M. restricta KCTC 27527 for a better understanding of the genome of this fungus.Copyright © 2019 Cho et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Genome Sequence of a California Isolate of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Race 3, a Fungus Causing Wilt Disease on Tomato.

Fusarium wilt of tomato, caused by the soilborne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, is an increasingly important disease of tomato. This paper reports the high-quality draft genome assembly of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici isolate D11 (race 3), which consists of 39 scaffolds with 57,281,978?bp (GC content, 47.5%), an N50 of 4,408,267?bp, a mean read coverage of 99.8×, and 17,682 predicted genes. Copyright © 2019 Henry et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Transposable Elements Adaptive Role in Genome Plasticity, Pathogenicity and Evolution in Fungal Phytopathogens.

Transposable elements (TEs) are agents of genetic variability in phytopathogens as they are a source of adaptive evolution through genome diversification. Although many studies have uncovered information on TEs, the exact mechanism behind TE-induced changes within the genome remains poorly understood. Furthermore, convergent trends towards bigger genomes, emergence of novel genes and gain or loss of genes implicate a TE-regulated genome plasticity of fungal phytopathogens. TEs are able to alter gene expression by revamping the cis-regulatory elements or recruiting epigenetic control. Recent findings show that TEs recruit epigenetic control on the expression of effector genes as part of the coordinated…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Heterologous Expression of Ilicicolin H Biosynthetic Gene Cluster and Production of a New Potent Antifungal Reagent, Ilicicolin J.

Ilicicolin H is a broad-spectrum antifungal agent targeting mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 reductase. Unfortunately, ilicicolin H shows reduced activities in vivo. Here, we report our effort on the identification of ilicicolin H biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC) by genomic sequencing a producing strain, Neonectria sp. DH2, and its heterologous production in Aspergillus nidulans. In addition, a shunt product with similar antifungal activities, ilicicolin J, was uncovered. This effort would provide a base for future combinatorial biosynthesis of ilicicolin H analogues. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that the backbone of ilicicolin H is assembled by a polyketide-nonribosomal peptide synthethase (IliA), and then offloaded with a…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Genome Analysis of Hypomyces perniciosus, the Causal Agent of Wet Bubble Disease of Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus).

The mycoparasitic fungus Hypomyces perniciosus causes wet bubble disease of mushrooms, particularly Agaricus bisporus. The genome of a highly virulent strain of H. perniciosus HP10 was sequenced and compared to three other fungi from the order Hypocreales that cause disease on A. bisporus. H. perniciosus genome is ~44 Mb, encodes 10,077 genes and enriched with transposable elements up to 25.3%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that H. perniciosus is closely related to Cladobotryum protrusum and diverged from their common ancestor ~156.7 million years ago. H. perniciosus has few secreted proteins compared to C. protrusum and Trichoderma virens, but significantly expanded protein families…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Mitovirus and Mitochondrial Coding Sequences from Basal Fungus Entomophthora muscae.

Fungi constituting the Entomophthora muscae species complex (members of subphylum Entomophthoromycotina, phylum Zoopagamycota) commonly kill their insect hosts and manipulate host behaviors in the process. In this study, we made use of public transcriptome data to identify and characterize eight new species of mitoviruses associated with several different E. muscae isolates. Mitoviruses are simple RNA viruses that replicate in host mitochondria and are frequently found in more phylogenetically apical fungi (members of subphylum Glomeromyoctina, phylum Mucoromycota, phylum Basidiomycota and phylum Ascomycota) as well as in plants. E. muscae is the first fungus from phylum Zoopagomycota, and thereby the most phylogenetically…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Cellular Dynamics and Genomic Identity of Centromeres in Cereal Blast Fungus.

Precise kinetochore-microtubule interactions ensure faithful chromosome segregation in eukaryotes. Centromeres, identified as scaffolding sites for kinetochore assembly, are among the most rapidly evolving chromosomal loci in terms of the DNA sequence and length and organization of intrinsic elements. Neither the centromere structure nor the kinetochore dynamics is well studied in plant-pathogenic fungi. Here, we sought to understand the process of chromosome segregation in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae High-resolution imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged inner kinetochore proteins CenpA and CenpC revealed unusual albeit transient declustering of centromeres just before anaphase separation of chromosomes in M. oryzae Strikingly, the…

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