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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of the streptomycin-dependent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain 18b.

The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish a latent infection (LTBI) in humans confounds the treatment of tuberculosis. Consequently, there is a need to discover new therapeutic agents that can kill M. tuberculosis both during active disease and LTBI. The streptomycin-dependent strain of M. tuberculosis, 18b, provides a useful tool for this purpose since upon removal of streptomycin (STR) it enters a non-replicating state that mimics latency both in vitro and in animal models.The 4.41 Mb genome sequence of M. tuberculosis 18b was determined and this revealed the strain to belong to clade 3 of the ancient ancestral lineage of the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequences of five nonvirulent Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4 strains.

We present the complete genome sequences of five nonpathogenicListeria monocytogenesserovar 4 strains: WSLC 1018 (4e), 1019 (4c), 1020 (4a), 1033 (4d), and 1047 (4d). These sequences may help to uncover genes involved in the synthesis of the serovar antigens-phenotypic determinants of virulence deemed clinically relevant. Copyright © 2016 Sumrall et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Single-molecule DNA hybridisation studied by using a modified DNA sequencer: a comparison with surface plasmon resonance data

Current methods for the determination of molecular interactions are widely used in the analytical sciences. To identify new methods, we investigated as a model system the hybridisation of a short 7 nt oligonucleotide labelled with, structurally, very similar cyanine dyes CY3 and DY-547, respectively, to a 34 nt oligonucleotide probe immobilised in a zero-mode waveguide (ZMW) nanostructure. Using a modified commercial off-the-shelf DNA sequencer, we established the principles to measure biomolecular interactions at the single-molecule level. Kinetic data were obtained from trains of fluorescence pulses, allowing the calculation of association and dissociation rate constants (k on, k off). For the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The absence of a mature cell wall sacculus in stable Listeria monocytogenes L-form cells is independent of peptidoglycan synthesis.

L-forms are cell wall-deficient variants of otherwise walled bacteria that maintain the ability to survive and proliferate in absence of the surrounding peptidoglycan sacculus. While transient or unstable L-forms can revert to the walled state and may still rely on residual peptidoglycan synthesis for multiplication, stable L-forms cannot revert to the walled form and are believed to propagate in the complete absence of peptidoglycan. L-forms are increasingly studied as a fundamental biological model system for cell wall synthesis. Here, we show that a stable L-form of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes features a surprisingly intact peptidoglycan synthesis pathway including glycosyl…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Pseudomonas cerasi sp. nov. (non Griffin, 1911) isolated from diseased tissue of cherry.

Eight isolates of Gram-negative fluorescent bacteria (58(T), 122, 374, 791, 963, 966, 970a and 1021) were obtained from diseased tissue of cherry trees from different regions of Poland. The symptoms resembled those of bacterial canker. Based on an analysis of 16S rDNA sequences the isolates shared the highest over 99.9% similarity with Pseudomonas ficuserectae JCM 2400(T) and P. congelans DSM 14939(T). Phylogenetic analysis using housekeeping genes gyrB, rpoD and rpoB revealed that they form a separate cluster and confirmed their closest relation to P. syringae NCPPB 281(T) and P. congelans LMG 21466(T). DNA-DNA hybridization between the cherry isolate 58(T) and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Staphylococcus carnosus LTH 3730.

Specific strains of the apathogenic coagulase-negative species Staphylococcus carnosus are frequently used as meat starter cultures, as they contribute to color formation and the production of aroma compounds. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of S. carnosus LTH 3730, a strain isolated from a fermented fish product. Copyright © 2016 Müller et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Full-length nucleotide sequences of mcr-1-harboring plasmids isolated from extended- spectrum-ß-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates of different origins.

Here, we present the full sequences of three mcr-1-carrying plasmids isolated from extended-spectrum-ß-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli The plasmids belong to three different replicon types and are 34,640 bp, 209,401 bp, and 247,885 bp in size. We describe for the first time a composite transposon containing mcr-1 localized on a multidrug-resistant (MDR) IncHI2 plasmid harboring additional determinants of resistance to six different classes of antibiotics, including the ESBL gene blaCTX-M-1, and heavy metal resistance. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The evolution of orphan regions in genomes of a fungal pathogen of wheat.

Fungal plant pathogens rapidly evolve virulence on resistant hosts through mutations in genes encoding proteins that modulate the host immune responses. The mutational spectrum likely includes chromosomal rearrangements responsible for gains or losses of entire genes. However, the mechanisms creating adaptive structural variation in fungal pathogen populations are poorly understood. We used complete genome assemblies to quantify structural variants segregating in the highly polymorphic fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici The genetic basis of virulence in Z. tritici is complex, and populations harbor significant genetic variation for virulence; hence, we aimed to identify whether structural variation led to functional differences. We combined…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A complete toolset for the study of Ustilago bromivora and Brachypodium sp. as a fungal-temperate grass pathosystem.

Due to their economic relevance, the study of plant pathogen interactions is of importance. However, elucidating these interactions and their underlying molecular mechanisms remains challenging since both host and pathogen need to be fully genetically accessible organisms. Here we present milestones in the establishment of a new biotrophic model pathosystem: Ustilago bromivora and Brachypodium sp. We provide a complete toolset, including an annotated fungal genome and methods for genetic manipulation of the fungus and its host plant. This toolset will enable researchers to easily study biotrophic interactions at the molecular level on both the pathogen and the host side. Moreover,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Cell cycle constraints and environmental control of local DNA hypomethylation in a-proteobacteria.

Heritable DNA methylation imprints are ubiquitous and underlie genetic variability from bacteria to humans. In microbial genomes, DNA methylation has been implicated in gene transcription, DNA replication and repair, nucleoid segregation, transposition and virulence of pathogenic strains. Despite the importance of local (hypo)methylation at specific loci, how and when these patterns are established during the cell cycle remains poorly characterized. Taking advantage of the small genomes and the synchronizability of a-proteobacteria, we discovered that conserved determinants of the cell cycle transcriptional circuitry establish specific hypomethylation patterns in the cell cycle model system Caulobacter crescentus. We used genome-wide methyl-N6-adenine (m6A-) analyses…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence and transcriptome regulation of the pentose utilizing yeast Sugiyamaella lignohabitans.

Efficient conversion of hexoses and pentoses into value-added chemicals represents one core step for establishing economically feasible biorefineries from lignocellulosic material. While extensive research efforts have recently provided advances in the overall process performance, the quest for new microbial cell factories and novel enzymes sources is still open. As demonstrated recently the yeast Sugiyamaella lignohabitans (formerly Candida lignohabitans) represents a promising microbial cell factory for the production of organic acids from lignocellulosic hydrolysates. We report here the de novo genome assembly of S. lignohabitans using the Single Molecule Real-Time platform, with gene prediction refined by using RNA-seq. The sequencing revealed…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli 81009, a representative of the sequence type 131 C1-M27 clade with a multidrug-resistant phenotype.

The sequence type 131 (ST131)-H30 clone is responsible for a significant proportion of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal Escherichia coli infections. Recently, the C1-M27 clade of ST131-H30, associated with blaCTX-M-27, has emerged. The complete genome sequence of E. coli isolate 81009 belonging to this clone, previously used during the development of ST131-specific monoclonal antibodies, is reported here. Copyright © 2018 Mutti et al.

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