X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Sunday, July 7, 2019

Mistranslation can enhance fitness through purging of deleterious mutations.

Phenotypic mutations are amino acid changes caused by mistranslation. How phenotypic mutations affect the adaptive evolution of new protein functions is unknown. Here we evolve the antibiotic resistance protein TEM-1 towards resistance on the antibiotic cefotaxime in an Escherichia coli strain with a high mistranslation rate. TEM-1 populations evolved in such strains endow host cells with a general growth advantage, not only on cefotaxime but also on several other antibiotics that ancestral TEM-1 had been unable to deactivate. High-throughput sequencing of TEM-1 populations shows that this advantage is associated with a lower incidence of weakly deleterious genotypic mutations. Our observations…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of three isolates of Xanthomonas fragariae, the bacterium responsible for angular leaf spots on strawberry plants.

Xanthomonas fragariae is a worldwide-spread plant bacterial disease causing angular leaf spots, thus reducing the yield of production for strawberry fruits. Three isolates with various geographic and time origins were sequenced with long-read technology (PacBio) to generate finished genome sequences of virulent strains and observe the variability in their contents. Copyright © 2017 Gétaz et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae 704SK10, an OXA-48-encoding wastewater isolate.

Here we present the complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae 704SK10, a Swiss wastewater isolate encoding an OXA-48 carbapenemase. Assembly resulted in closed sequences of the 4,876,946-bp chromosome, a 111,184-bp IncF plasmid, and an OXA-48-encoding IncL plasmid (63,458 bp) nearly identical to the previously described plasmid pOXA-48. Copyright © 2017 Marti et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli ABWA45, an rmtB-encoding wastewater isolate.

We present the complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli ABWA45, a 16S rRNA methyltransferase-producing wastewater isolate. Assembly and annotation resulted in a 5,094,639-bp circular chromosome and four closed plasmids of 145,220 bp, 113,793 bp, 57,232 bp, and 47,900 bp in size. Furthermore, a small open plasmid (7,537 bp in size) was assembled. Copyright © 2017 Zurfluh et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Anoxybacillus flavithermus strain 52-1A isolated from a heat-processed powdered milk concentrate.

The thermophilic spore-forming bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus is responsible for powdered milk product spoilage, and its presence in dairy processing environments is a concern. Here, the complete genome sequence of the A. flavithermus strain 52-1A isolated from a heat-processed powdered milk product concentrate in Switzerland is presented. Copyright © 2017 Tasara et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of Lactobacillus curvatus KG6, L. curvatus MRS6, and Lactobacillus sakei FAM18311, isolated from fermented meat products.

The genomes of Lactobacillus curvatus KG6, L. curvatus MRS6, and Lactobacillus sakei FAM18311 were sequenced and assembled using PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. The strains were isolated from Swiss fermented meat products. Circular chromosomes were of 1.98 Mbp (KG6), 2.11 Mbp (MRS6), and 1.95 Mbp (FAM18311), with a G+C content of 41.3 to 42.0%. Copyright © 2017 Jans et al.

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Key features of mcr-1-bearing plasmids from Escherichia coli isolated from humans and food.

Mcr-1-harboring Enterobacteriaceae are reported worldwide since their first discovery in 2015. However, a limited number of studies are available that compared full-length plasmid sequences of human and animal origins.In this study, mcr-1-bearing plasmids from seven Escherichia coli isolates recovered from patients (n = 3), poultry meat (n = 2) and turkey meat (n = 2) in Switzerland were further analyzed and compared. Isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The mcr-1-bearing plasmids were transferred by transformation into reference strain E. coli DH5a and MCR-1-producing transformants were selected on LB-agar supplemented with 2 mg/L colistin. Purified plasmids were then sequenced and compared.MLST revealed six distinct STs, illustrating…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Multiple hybrid de novo genome assembly of finger millet, an orphan allotetraploid crop.

Finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn) is an important crop for food security because of its tolerance to drought, which is expected to be exacerbated by global climate changes. Nevertheless, it is often classified as an orphan/underutilized crop because of the paucity of scientific attention. Among several small millets, finger millet is considered as an excellent source of essential nutrient elements, such as iron and zinc; hence, it has potential as an alternate coarse cereal. However, high-quality genome sequence data of finger millet are currently not available. One of the major problems encountered in the genome assembly of this species…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome expansion and lineage-specific genetic innovations in the forest pathogenic fungi Armillaria.

Armillaria species are both devastating forest pathogens and some of the largest terrestrial organisms on Earth. They forage for hosts and achieve immense colony sizes via rhizomorphs, root-like multicellular structures of clonal dispersal. Here, we sequenced and analysed the genomes of four Armillaria species and performed RNA sequencing and quantitative proteomic analysis on the invasive and reproductive developmental stages of A.?ostoyae. Comparison with 22 related fungi revealed a significant genome expansion in Armillaria, affecting several pathogenicity-related genes, lignocellulose-degrading enzymes and lineage-specific genes expressed during rhizomorph development. Rhizomorphs express an evolutionarily young transcriptome that shares features with the transcriptomes of both fruiting bodies…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Letting go: bacterial genome reduction solves the dilemma of adapting to predation mortality in a substrate-restricted environment.

Resource limitation and predation mortality are major determinants of microbial population dynamics, and optimization for either aspect is considered to imply a trade-off with respect to the other. Adaptation to these selective factors may, moreover, lead to disadvantages at rich growth conditions. We present an example of a concomitant evolutionary optimization to both, substrate limitation and predation in an aggregate-forming freshwater bacterial isolate, and we elucidate an underlying genomic mechanism. Bacteria were propagated in serial batch culture in a nutrient-restricted environment either with or without a bacterivorous flagellate. Strains isolated after 26 growth cycles of the predator-prey co-cultures formed as…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

The genome analysis of Candidatus Burkholderia crenata reveals that secondary metabolism may be a key function of the Ardisia crenata leaf nodule symbiosis.

A majority of Ardisia species harbour Burkholderia sp. bacteria within specialized leaf nodules. The bacteria are transmitted hereditarily and have not yet been cultured outside of their host. Because the plants cannot develop beyond the seedling stage without their symbionts, the symbiosis is considered obligatory. We sequenced for the first time the genome of Candidatus Burkholderia crenata (Ca. B. crenata), the leaf nodule symbiont of Ardisia crenata. The genome of Ca. B. crenata is the smallest Burkholderia genome to date. It contains a large amount of insertion sequences and pseudogenes and displays features consistent with reductive genome evolution. The genome…

Read More »

1 2 3 4 5

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives