250 kDa) and have a lengthy repetitive region that is flanked by relatively short (~100 amino acids), non-repetitive amino- and carboxyl-terminal regions. The amino acid sequence motifs in the repetitive region vary greatly between spidroin type, while motif length and number underlie the remarkable mechanical properties of spider silk fibers. Existing knowledge of pyriform spidroins is fragmented, making it difficult to define links between the structure and function of pyriform spidroins. Here, we present the full-length sequence of the gene encoding pyriform spidroin 1 (PySp1) from the silver garden spider Argiope argentata. The predicted protein is similar to previously reported PySp1 sequences but the A. argentata PySp1 has a uniquely long and repetitive "linker", which bridges the amino-terminal and repetitive regions. Predictions of the hydrophobicity and secondary structure of A. argentata PySp1 identify regions important to protein self-assembly. Analysis of the full complement of A. argentata PySp1 repeats reveals extreme intragenic homogenization, and comparison of A. argentata PySp1 repeats with other PySp1 sequences identifies variability in two sub-repetitive expansion regions. Overall, the full-length A. argentata PySp1 sequence provides new evidence for understanding how pyriform spidroins contribute to the properties of pyriform silk fibers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved."/>
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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete gene sequence of spider attachment silk protein (PySp1) reveals novel linker regions and extreme repeat homogenization.

Spiders use a myriad of silk types for daily survival, and each silk type has a unique suite of task-specific mechanical properties. Of all spider silk types, pyriform silk is distinct because it is a combination of a dry protein fiber and wet glue. Pyriform silk fibers are coated with wet cement and extruded into “attachment discs” that adhere silks to each other and to substrates. The mechanical properties of spider silk types are linked to the primary and higher-level structures of spider silk proteins (spidroins). Spidroins are often enormous molecules (>250 kDa) and have a lengthy repetitive region that is…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of two geographically distinct Legionella micdadei clinical isolates.

Legionella is a highly diverse genus of intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause Legionnaire’s disease (LD), an often severe form of pneumonia. Two L. micdadei sp. clinical isolates, obtained from patients hospitalized with LD from geographically distinct areas, were sequenced using PacBio SMRT cell technology, identifying incomplete phage regions, which may impact virulence. Copyright © 2017 Osborne et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Leuconostoc suionicum DSM 20241(T) provides insights into its functional and metabolic features.

The genome of Leuconostoc suionicum DSM 20241(T) (=ATCC 9135(T) = LMG 8159(T) = NCIMB 6992(T)) was completely sequenced and its fermentative metabolic pathways were reconstructed to investigate the fermentative properties and metabolites of strain DSM 20241(T) during fermentation. The genome of L. suionicum DSM 20241(T) consists of a circular chromosome (2026.8 Kb) and a circular plasmid (21.9 Kb) with 37.58% G + C content, encoding 997 proteins, 12 rRNAs, and 72 tRNAs. Analysis of the metabolic pathways of L. suionicum DSM 20241(T) revealed that strain DSM 20241(T) performs heterolactic acid fermentation and can metabolize diverse organic compounds including glucose, fructose, galactose, cellobiose, mannose, sucrose, trehalose, arbutin,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Free-living Enterobacterium Pragia fontium 24613: complete genome sequence and metabolic profiling.

Pragia fontium is one of the few species that belongs to the group of atypical hydrogen sulfide-producing enterobacteria. Unlike other members of this closely related group, P. fontium is not associated with any known host and has been reported as a free-living bacterium. Whole genome sequencing and metabolic fingerprinting confirmed the phylogenetic position of P. fontium inside the group of atypical H2S producers. Genomic data have revealed that P. fontium 24613 has limited pathogenic potential, although there are signs of genome decay. Although the lack of specific virulence factors and no association with a host species suggest a free-living style,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Planococcus donghaensis JH1(T), a pectin-degrading bacterium.

The type strain Planococcus donghaensis JH1(T) is a psychrotolerant and halotolerant bacterium with starch-degrading ability. Here, we determine the carbon utilization profile of P. donghaensis JH1(T) and report the first complete genome of the strain. This study revealed the strain’s ability to utilize pectin and d-galacturonic acid, and identified genes responsible for degradation of the polysaccharides. The genomic information provided may serve as a fundamental resource for full exploration of the biotechnological potential of P. donghaensis JH1(T). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus subterraneus KCTC 3922(T) as a potential denitrifier.

Denitrification is a crucial process for the global nitrogen cycle through the reduction of nitrates by heterotrophic bacteria. Denitrifying microorganisms play an important role in eliminating fixed nitrogen pollutants from the ecosystem, concomitant with N2O emission. Although many microbial denitrifiers have been identified, little is known about the denitrifying ability of the genus Geobacillus. Here, we report the first complete genome sequences of Geobacillus subterraneus KCTC 3922(T), isolated from Liaohe oil field in China, and G. thermodenitrificans KCTC 3902(T). The strain KCTC 3922(T) contains a complete set of genes involved in denitrification, cofactor biogenesis, and transport systems, which is consistent…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. CC6-YY-74, isolated from Arctic Ocean sediment

Pseudomonas sp. CC6-YY-74, a psychrotrophic, denitrifying bacterium isolated from Arctic Ocean sediment, uses NO3- or NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source to grow at low temperatures. Here we described the complete genome of Pseudomonas sp. CC6-YY-74. The genome has one circular chromosome of 5,040,792 bp (61.73 mol% G + C content), consisting of 4747 coding genes, 68 tRNA genes, as well as six rRNA operons as 16S-23S-5S rRNA. According to the annotation results, strain CC6-YY-74 encodes 52 proteins related to nitrogen metabolism, including a complete denitrifying pathway, and more than 20 kinds of hydrolytic enzymes.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus sp. 275, producing extracellular cellulolytic, xylanolytic and ligninolytic enzymes.

Technologies for degradation of three major components of lignocellulose (e.g. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) are needed to efficiently utilize lignocellulose. Here, we report Bacillus sp. 275 isolated from a mudflat exhibiting various lignocellulolytic activities including cellulase, xylanase, laccase and peroxidase in the cell culture supernatant. The complete genome of Bacillus sp. 275 strain contains 3832 protein cording sequences and an average G+C content of 46.32% on one chromosome (4045,581bp) and one plasmid (6389bp). The genes encoding enzymes related to the degradation of cellulose, xylan and lignin were detected in the Bacillus sp. 275 genome. In addition, the genes encoding glucosidases…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence and analysis of three kinds of ß-agarase of Cellulophaga lytica DAU203 isolated from marine sediment.

Cellulophaga lytica DAU203 (KACC 19187), isolated from the marine sediment in Korea, has a strong ability to degrade agar. The genome of C. lytica DAU203 contains a single chromosome that is 3,952,957bp in length, with 32.02% G+C contents. The genomic information predicted that the DAU203 has the potential to be utilized in various enzymatic industries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis 9912D reveals its biocontrol mechanism as a novel commercial biological fungicide agent.

A Bacillus sp. 9912 mutant, 9912D, was approved as a new biological fungicide agent by the Ministry of Agriculture of the People’s Republic of China in 2016 owing to its excellent inhibitory effect on various plant pathogens and being environment-friendly. Here, we present the genome of 9912D with a circular chromosome having 4436 coding DNA sequences (CDSs), and a circular plasmid encoding 59 CDSs. This strain was finally designated as Bacillus velezensis based on phylogenomic analyses. Genome analysis revealed a total of 19 candidate gene clusters involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis, including potential new type II lantibiotics. The absence of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Ruminococcaceae bacterium CPB6: A newly isolated culture for efficient n-caproic acid production from lactate.

n-caproic acid (CA) is a valuable chemical feedstock for various industrial applications. Biological production of CA from renewable carbon sources has attracted a lot of attentions recently. We lately reported the new culture Ruminococcaceae bacterium CPB6, which was isolated from a microbiome for efficient CA production from lactate. To further elucidate its metabolism, we sequenced the whole genome of the strain. The size of the complete genome is 2,069,994bp with 50.58% GC content; no plasmid was identified. Sets of genes involved in the fatty acid biosynthesis via acyl carrier protein (ACP) and coenzyme A (CoA) as well as lactate oxidation/reduction…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Third-generation sequencing and analysis of four complete pig liver esterase gene sequences in clones identified by screening BAC library.

Pig liver carboxylesterase (PLE) gene sequences in GenBank are incomplete, which has led to difficulties in studying the genetic structure and regulation mechanisms of gene expression of PLE family genes. The aim of this study was to obtain and analysis of complete gene sequences of PLE family by screening from a Rongchang pig BAC library and third-generation PacBio gene sequencing.After a number of existing incomplete PLE isoform gene sequences were analysed, primers were designed based on conserved regions in PLE exons, and the whole pig genome used as a template for Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Specific primers were then…

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