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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole-genome sequences of two closely related bacteria, Actinomyces sp. strain Chiba101 and Actinomyces denticolens DSM 20671(T).

Actinomyces sp. strain Chiba101, isolated from an arthritic leg joint of a pig raised in Japan, is a bacterium closely related to Actinomyces denticolens Here, we deciphered the complete genome sequence of Actinomyces sp. Chiba101 and the high-quality draft genome sequence of A. denticolens DSM 20671(T). Copyright © 2017 Kanesaki et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma bovis strain 08M.

Mycoplasma bovis is a major bacterial pathogen that can cause respiratory disease, mastitis, and arthritis in cattle. We report here the complete and annotated genome sequence of M. bovis strain 08M, isolated from a calf lung with pneumonia in China. Copyright © 2017 Chen et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First complete genome sequence of Bacillus glycinifermentans B-27.

The first complete genome sequence of Bacillus glycinifermentans B-27 was determined by SMRT sequencing generating a genome sequence with a total length of 4,607,442 bases. Based on this sequence 4738 protein-coding sequences were predicted and used to identify gene clusters that are related to the production of secondary metabolites such as Lichenysin, Bacillibactin and Bacitracin. This genomic potential combined with the ability of B. glycinifermentans B-27 to grown in bile containing media might contribute to a future application of this strain as probiotic in productive livestock potentially inhibiting competing and pathogenic organisms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Clostridium chauvoei, an evolutionary dead-end pathogen.

Full genome sequences of 20 strains of Clostridium chauvoei, the etiological agent of blackleg of cattle and sheep, isolated from four different continents over a period of 64 years (1951-2015) were determined and analyzed. The study reveals that the genome of the species C. chauvoei is highly homogeneous compared to the closely related species C. perfringens, a widespread pathogen that affects human and many animal species. Analysis of the CRISPR locus is sufficient to differentiate most C. chauvoei strains and is the most heterogenous region in the genome, containing in total 187 different spacer elements that are distributed as 30…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Novel urease-negative Helicobacter sp. ‘H. enhydrae sp. nov.’ isolated from inflamed gastric tissue of southern sea otters.

A total of 31 sea otters Enhydra lutris nereis found dead or moribund (and then euthanized) were necropsied in California, USA. Stomach biopsies were collected and transected with equal portions frozen or placed in formalin and analyzed histologically and screened for Helicobacter spp. in gastric tissue. Helicobacter spp. were isolated from 9 sea otters (29%); 58% (18 of 31) animals were positive for helicobacter by PCR. The Helicobacter sp. was catalase- and oxidase-positive and urease-negative. By electron microscopy, the Helicobacter sp. had lateral and polar sheathed flagella and had a slightly curved rod morphology. 16S and 23S rRNA sequence analyses…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain KM014, a clinical isolate from South Korea.

Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia, resulting in considerable economic losses in the swine industry. A few genome sequences of M. hyopneumoniae have been reported to date, implying that additional genome data are needed for further genetic studies. Here, we present the annotated genome sequence of M. hyopneumoniae strain KM014. Copyright © 2017 Han et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Molecular cloning and functional expression of the K(+) channel KV7.1 and the regulatory subunit KCNE1 from equine myocardium.

The voltage-gated K(+)-channel KV7.1 and the subunit KCNE1, encoded by the KCNQ1 and KCNE1 genes, respectively, are responsible for termination of the cardiac action potential. In humans, mutations in these genes can predispose patients to arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD).To characterize equine KV7.1/KCNE1 currents and compare them to human KV7.1/KCNE1 currents to determine whether KV7.1/KCNE1 plays a similar role in equine and human hearts.mRNA encoding KV7.1 and KCNE1 was isolated from equine hearts, sequenced, and cloned into expression vectors. The channel subunits were heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes or CHO-K1 cells and characterized using voltage-clamp techniques.Equine KV7.1/KCNE1 expressed…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genome analysis of programmed DNA elimination in nematodes.

Programmed DNA elimination is a developmentally regulated process leading to the reproducible loss of specific genomic sequences. DNA elimination occurs in unicellular ciliates and a variety of metazoans, including invertebrates and vertebrates. In metazoa, DNA elimination typically occurs in somatic cells during early development, leaving the germline genome intact. Reference genomes for metazoa that undergo DNA elimination are not available. Here, we generated germline and somatic reference genome sequences of the DNA eliminating pig parasitic nematode Ascaris suum and the horse parasite Parascaris univalens. In addition, we carried out in-depth analyses of DNA elimination in the parasitic nematode of humans,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic analyses reveal that partial sequence of an earlier pseudorabies virus in China is originated from a Bartha-vaccine-like strain.

Pseudorabies virus (PRV), the causative agent of Aujeszky?s disease, has gained increased attention in China in recent years as a result of the outbreak of emergent pseudorabies. Several genomic and partial sequences are available for Chinese emergent and European-American strains of PRV, but limited sequence data exist for the earlier Chinese strains. In this study, we determined the complete genomic sequence of one earlier Chinese strain SC and one emergent strain HLJ8. Compared with other known sequences, we demonstrated that PRV strains from distinct geographical regions displayed divergent evolution. Additionally, we report for the first time, a recombination event between…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Population structure and antimicrobial resistance profiles of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 sequence type 25 strains

Strains of serotype 2 Streptococcus suis are responsible for swine and human infections. Different serotype 2 genetic backgrounds have been defined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). However, little is known about the genetic diversity within each MLST sequence type (ST). Here, we used whole-genome sequencing to test the hypothesis that S. suis serotype 2 strains of the ST25 lineage are genetically heterogeneous. We evaluated 51 serotype 2 ST25 S. suis strains isolated from diseased pigs and humans in Canada, the United States of America, and Thailand. Whole-genome sequencing revealed numerous large-scale rearrangements in the ST25 genome, compared to the genomes…

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