X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:

Sanger Institute Birthday Gift to Scientists: 25 New Wildlife Genomes to Support Conservation and Science

Thursday, October 4, 2018

King scallops are more genetically diverse than we are? The Roesel’s bush cricket’s genome is four times the size of ours? These are just some of the findings made by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute after undertaking a project to sequence the DNA of 25 wildlife species important to the United Kingdom.

Although many of the species they selected are native to the British Isles, the implications of the research are expected to extend around the globe. The project’s first data release, the Golden Eagle genome, for instance, will impact the study of eagles in North America and elsewhere, according to Sanger Institute associate director Julia Wilson.

Wilson announced the release of the remaining 24 genomes at a 25th anniversary celebration at the Institute’s Cambridgeshire campus today.

“We have learned much through this project already and this new knowledge is flowing into many areas of our large-scale science,” Wilson said. “Now that the genomes have been read, the pieces of each species puzzle need to be put back together during genome assembly before they are made available.”

Among other questions scientists will explore with the new high-quality genomes are why some brown trout migrate to the open ocean while others don’t, and why red squirrels are vulnerable to the squirrel pox virus, yet grey squirrels can carry and spread the virus without becoming ill.

The genomes—selected by scientists to include representatives of flourishing, floundering, dangerous, iconic and cryptic species, as well as five picked by the public during a nationwide vote—were decoded using SMRT Sequencing. They will now be annotated and analyzed.

“Sequencing these species for the first time didn’t come without challenges, but our scientists and staff repeatedly came up with innovative solutions to overcome them,” Wilson said.

These challenges, documented in a blog series by 25 Genomes Project coordinator Dan Mead, included everything from acquiring specimens to “exploding flatworm goop.”

“We are already discovering the surprising secrets these species hold in their genomes,” Mead said. “Similar to when the Human Genome Project first began, we don’t know where these findings could take us.”

Whereas the first human genome took 13 years and billions of dollars to complete, the Sanger Institute was able to newly sequence 25 species’ genomes in less than one year, at a fraction of the cost. The high-quality genomes will be made freely available to scientists to use in their research.

We are honored to have been part of the effort, and extend Happy Birthday wishes to our colleagues across the pond. We look forward to another 25 years of collaboration!

 

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives