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Friday, July 19, 2019

Whole genome complete resequencing of Bacillus subtilis natto by combining long reads with high-quality short reads.

De novo microbial genome sequencing reached a turning point with third-generation sequencing (TGS) platforms, and several microbial genomes have been improved by TGS long reads. Bacillus subtilis natto is closely related to the laboratory standard strain B. subtilis Marburg 168, and it has a function in the production of the traditional Japanese fermented food “natto.” The B. subtilis natto BEST195 genome was previously sequenced with short reads, but it included some incomplete regions. We resequenced the BEST195 genome using a PacBio RS sequencer, and we successfully obtained a complete genome sequence from one scaffold without any gaps, and we also…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Selections that isolate recombinant mitochondrial genomes in animals.

Homologous recombination is widespread and catalyzes evolution. Nonetheless, its existence in animal mitochondrial DNA is questioned. We designed selections for recombination between co-resident mitochondrial genomes in various heteroplasmic Drosophila lines. In four experimental settings, recombinant genomes became the sole or dominant genome in the progeny. Thus, selection uncovers occurrence of homologous recombination in Drosophila mtDNA and documents its functional benefit. Double-strand breaks enhanced recombination in the germ line and revealed somatic recombination. When the recombination partner was a diverged D. melanogaster genome or a genome from a different species such as D. yakuba, sequencing revealed long continuous stretches of exchange.…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Mitotic intragenic recombination: A mechanism of survival for several congenital disorders of glycosylation.

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are disorders of abnormal protein glycosylation that affect multiple organ systems. Because most CDGs have been described in only a few individuals, our understanding of the associated phenotypes and the mechanisms of individual survival are limited. In the process of studying two siblings, aged 6 and 11 years, with MOGS-CDG and biallelic MOGS (mannosyl-oligosaccharide glucosidase) mutations (GenBank: NM_006302.2; c.[65C>A; 329G>A] p.[Ala22Glu; Arg110His]; c.[370C>T] p.[Gln124(*)]), we noted that their survival was much longer than the previous report of MOGS-CDG, in a child who died at 74 days of age. Upon mutation analysis, we detected multiple MOGS genotypes…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Single-molecule sequencing reveals complex genomic variation of hepatitis B virus during 15 years of chronic infection following liver transplantation.

Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is prevalent worldwide. The infectious agent, hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicates via an RNA intermediate and is error-prone, leading to rapid generation of closely related but not identical viral variants, including those that can escape host immune responses and antiviral treatments. The complexity of CHB can be further enhanced by the presence of HBV variants with large deletions in the genome, generated via splicing (spHBV). Although spHBV variants are incapable of autonomous replication, their replication is rescued by wild-type HBV. SpHBV variants have been shown to enhance wild-type virus replication, and their prevalence increases with liver…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Separate F-type plasmids have shaped the evolution of the H30 subclone of Escherichia coli sequence type 131.

The extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) H30 subclone of sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) has emerged abruptly as a dominant lineage of ExPEC responsible for human disease. The ST131-H30 lineage has been well described phylogenetically, yet its plasmid complement is not fully understood. Here, single-molecule, real-time sequencing was used to generate the complete plasmid sequences of ST131-H30 isolates and those belonging to other ST131 clades. Comparative analyses revealed separate F-type plasmids that have shaped the evolution of the main fluoroquinolone-resistant ST131-H30 clades. Specifically, an F1:A2:B20 plasmid is strongly associated with the H30R/C1 clade, whereas an F2:A1:B- plasmid is associated with the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Accumulation-associated protein enhances Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation under dynamic conditions and is required for infection in a rat catheter model.

Biofilm formation is the primary virulence factor of Staphylococcus epidermidis. S. epidermidis biofilms preferentially form on abiotic surfaces and may contain multiple matrix components, including proteins such as accumulation-associated protein (Aap). Following proteolytic cleavage of the A domain, which has been shown to enhance binding to host cells, B domain homotypic interactions support cell accumulation and biofilm formation. To further define the contribution of Aap to biofilm formation and infection, we constructed an aap allelic replacement mutant and an icaADBC aap double mutant. When subjected to fluid shear, strains deficient in Aap production produced significantly less biofilm than Aap-positive strains.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic analysis of 495 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium reveals broad dissemination of a vanA plasmid in more than 19 clones from Copenhagen, Denmark.

From 2012 to 2014, there has been a huge increase in vancomycin-resistant (vanA) Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) in Copenhagen, Denmark, with 602 patients infected or colonized with VREfm in 2014 compared with just 22 in 2012. The objective of this study was to describe the genetic epidemiology of VREfm to assess the contribution of clonal spread and horizontal transfer of the vanA transposon (Tn1546) and plasmid in the dissemination of VREfm in hospitals.VREfm from Copenhagen, Denmark (2012-14) were whole-genome sequenced. The clonal structure was determined and the structure of Tn1546-like transposons was characterized. One VREfm isolate belonging to the largest clonal…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Assessment of bacterial profiles in aged, home-made Sichuan paocai brine with varying titratable acidity by PacBio SMRT Sequencing technology

Sichuan paocai, a traditional Chinese fermented vegetable, is rife with lactic acid bacteria (LAB). However, the precise bacterial profiles of home-made Sichuan paocai brine (HSPB) remain unclear. In this study, the bacterial compositions of 38 aged HSPB samples with varying titratable acidity (TA) were determined by SMRT sequencing of the full-length 16S rRNA gene. The lactic and acetic acids of HSPBs were also measured to determine any relevance with the bacterial profiles. The SMRT sequencing results reveal that the HSPB bacterial communities were comprised of numerous phylogenetic taxa, including 35 phyla, 371 genera, and 593 species; the bacterial diversity decreased…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus thermophilus KLDS 3.1003,a strain with high antimicrobial potential against foodborne and vaginal pathogens.

Lactic acid bacteria play increasingly important roles in the food industry. Streptococcus thermophilus KLDS 3.1003 strain was isolated from traditional yogurt in Inner Mongolia, China. It has shown high antimicrobial activity against selected foodborne and vaginal pathogens. In this study, we investigated and analyzed its complete genome sequence. The S. thermophilus KLDS 3.1003 genome comprise of a 1,899,956 bp chromosome with a G+C content of 38.92%, 1,995 genes, and 6 rRNAs. With the exception of S. thermophilus M17TZA496, S. thermophilus KLDS 3.1003 has more tRNAs (amino acid coding genes) compared to some S. thermophilus strains available on the National Centre…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Towards systems metabolic engineering in Pichia pastoris.

The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is firmly established as a host for the production of recombinant proteins, frequently outperforming other heterologous hosts. Already, a sizeable amount of systems biology knowledge has been acquired for this non-conventional yeast. By applying various omics-technologies, productivity features have been thoroughly analyzed and optimized via genetic engineering. However, challenging clonal variability, limited vector repertoire and insufficient genome annotation have hampered further developments. Yet, in the last few years a reinvigorated effort to establish P. pastoris as a host for both protein and metabolite production is visible. A variety of compounds from terpenoids to polyketides have…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Quantitative proteomics for the comprehensive analysis of stress responses of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei F19.

Lactic acid bacteria are broadly employed as starter cultures in the manufacture of foods. Upon technological preparation, they are confronted with drying stress that amalgamates numerous stress conditions resulting in losses of fitness and survival. To better understand and differentiate physiological stress responses, discover general and specific markers for the investigated stress conditions, and predict optimal preconditioning for starter cultures, we performed a comprehensive genomic and quantitative proteomic analysis of a commonly used model system, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei TMW 1.1434 (isogenic with F19) under 11 typical stress conditions, including among others oxidative, osmotic, pH, and pressure stress. We identified…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Rapid genetic and developmental morphological change following extreme celerity

Proximate environmental effects on metamorphosis have been explored in many vertebrate systems, but less attention has been devoted to how the environment affects developmental morphological change in mammals. Understanding proximate environmental effects on mammalian morphological change, particularly changes involving skin replacement, may aid in the design of therapeutic strategies to address severe burn or other debilitating injuries. Here, we specifically explore effects of celerity broadly, and we present results showing rapid change in mammalian morphological development following encountering maximum celerity. Morphological changes were pronounced within 96 hours and included at least partial regeneration of skin and organs as well as…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Development of Streptomyces sp. FR-008 as an emerging chassis

Microbial-derived natural products are important in both the pharmaceutical industry and academic research. As the metabolic potential of original producer especially Streptomyces is often limited by slow growth rate, complicated cultivation profile, and unfeasible genetic manipulation, so exploring a Streptomyces as a super industrial chassis is valuable and urgent. Streptomyces sp. FR-008 is a fast-growing microorganism and can also produce a considerable amount of macrolide candicidin via modular polyketide synthase. In this study, we evaluated Streptomyces sp. FR-008 as a potential industrial-production chassis. First, PacBio sequencing and transcriptome analyses indicated that the Streptomyces sp. FR-008 genome size is 7.26 Mb, which…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Dissection of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Kozakia baliensis.

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are well known producers of commercially used exopolysaccharides, such as cellulose and levan. Kozakia (K.) baliensis is a relatively new member of AAB, which produces ultra-high molecular weight levan from sucrose. Throughout cultivation of two K. baliensis strains (DSM 14400, NBRC 16680) on sucrose-deficient media, we found that both strains still produce high amounts of mucous, water-soluble substances from mannitol and glycerol as (main) carbon sources. This indicated that both Kozakia strains additionally produce new classes of so far not characterized EPS.By whole genome sequencing of both strains, circularized genomes could be established and typical EPS…

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