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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Completed genome sequences of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto B31(NRZ) and closely related patient isolates from Europe.

Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto is a causative agent of human Lyme borreliosis in the United States and Europe. We report here the completed genome sequences of strain B31 isolated from a tick in the United States and two closely related strains from Europe, PAli and PAbe, which were isolated from patients with erythema migrans and neuroborreliosis, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Margos et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Phenotypic and genomic comparison of Mycobacterium aurum and surrogate model species to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: implications for drug discovery.

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and represents one of the major challenges facing drug discovery initiatives worldwide. The considerable rise in bacterial drug resistance in recent years has led to the need of new drugs and drug regimens. Model systems are regularly used to speed-up the drug discovery process and circumvent biosafety issues associated with manipulating M. tuberculosis. These include the use of strains such as Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium marinum that can be handled in biosafety level 2 facilities, making high-throughput screening feasible. However, each of these model species have their own limitations.We report and describe the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The MHC locus and genetic susceptibility to autoimmune and infectious diseases.

In the past 50 years, variants in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, also known as the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), have been reported as major risk factors for complex diseases. Recent advances, including large genetic screens, imputation, and analyses of non-additive and epistatic effects, have contributed to a better understanding of the shared and specific roles of MHC variants in different diseases. We review these advances and discuss the relationships between MHC variants involved in autoimmune and infectious diseases. Further work in this area will help to distinguish between alternative hypotheses for the role of pathogens in autoimmune disease development.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequences of two unclassified Chitinophagaceae bacteria, IBVUCB1 and IBVUCB2, isolated from environmental samples.

We report here the draft genome sequences of two Chitinophagaceae bacteria, IBVUCB1 and IBVUCB2, assembled from metagenomes of surface samples from freshwater lakes. The genomes are >99% complete and may represent new genera within the Chitinophagaceae family, indicating a larger diversity than currently identified. Copyright © 2017 Orr et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequences of two unclassified bacteria, Sphingomonas sp. strains IBVSS1 and IBVSS2, isolated from environmental samples.

We report here the draft genome sequences of Sphingomonas sp. IBVSS1 and IBVSS2, two bacteria assembled from the metagenomes of surface samples from freshwater lakes. The genomes are >99% complete and may represent new species within the Sphingomonas genus, indicating a larger diversity than currently identified. Copyright © 2017 Orr et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequences of two unclassified bacteria, Hydrogenophaga sp. strains IBVHS1 and IBVHS2, isolated from environmental samples.

We report here the draft genome sequences of Hydrogenophaga sp. strains IBVHS1 and IBVHS2, two bacteria assembled from the metagenomes of surface samples from freshwater lakes. The genomes are >95% complete and may represent new species within the Hydrogenophaga genus, indicating a larger diversity than currently identified. Copyright © 2017 Orr et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Dissemination and characteristics of a novel plasmid-encoded carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D beta-lactamase, OXA-436 from four patients involving six different hospitals in Denmark.

The diversity of OXA-48-like carbapenemases is continually expanding. In this study, we describe the dissemination and characteristics of a novel carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D carbapenemase (CHDL) named OXA-436. In total, six OXA-436-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates including Enterobacter asburiae (n=3), Citrobacter freundii (n=2) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=1) were identified in four patients in the period between September 2013 and April 2015. All three species of OXA-436-producing Enterobacteriaceae were found in one patient. The amino acid sequence of OXA-436 showed 90.4-92.8% identity to other acquired OXA-48-like variants. Expression of OXA-436 in Escherichia coli and kinetic analysis of purified OXA-436 revealed an activity profile similar…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Resequencing of the Leishmania infantum (strain JPCM5) genome and de novo assembly into 36 contigs.

Leishmania parasites are the causative of leishmaniasis, a group of potentially fatal human diseases. Control strategies for leishmaniasis can be enhanced by genome based investigations. The publication in 2005 of the Leishmania major genome sequence, and two years later the genomes for the species Leishmania braziliensis and Leishmania infantum were major milestones. Since then, the L. infantum genome, although highly fragmented and incomplete, has been used widely as the reference genome to address whole transcriptomics and proteomics studies. Here, we report the sequencing of the L. infantum genome by two NGS methodologies and, as a result, the complete genome assembly…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Pectobacterium polaris sp. nov., isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum).

The genus Pectobacterium, which belongs to the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae, contains numerous species that cause soft rot diseases in a wide range of plants. The species Pectobacterium carotovorum is highly heterogeneous, indicating a need for re-evaluation and a better classification of the species. PacBio was used for sequencing of two soft-rot-causing bacterial strains (NIBIO1006T and NIBIO1392), initially identified as P. carotovorumstrains by fatty acid analysis and sequencing of three housekeeping genes (dnaX, icdA and mdh). Their taxonomic relationship to other Pectobacterium species was determined and the distance from any described species within the genus Pectobacterium was less than 94?% average…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomics of early-diverging mushroom-forming fungi provides insights into the origins of lignocellulose decay capabilities.

Evolution of lignocellulose decomposition was one of the most ecologically important innovations in fungi. White-rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes (mushrooms and relatives) are the most effective microorganisms in degrading both cellulose and lignin components of woody plant cell walls (PCW). However, the precise evolutionary origins of lignocellulose decomposition are poorly understood, largely because certain early-diverging clades of Agaricomycetes and its sister group, the Dacrymycetes, have yet to be sampled, or have been undersampled, in comparative genomic studies. Here, we present new genome sequences of ten saprotrophic fungi, including members of the Dacrymycetes and early-diverging clades of Agaricomycetes (Cantharellales, Sebacinales, Auriculariales,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The Atlantic salmon genome provides insights into rediploidization.

The whole-genome duplication 80 million years ago of the common ancestor of salmonids (salmonid-specific fourth vertebrate whole-genome duplication, Ss4R) provides unique opportunities to learn about the evolutionary fate of a duplicated vertebrate genome in 70 extant lineages. Here we present a high-quality genome assembly for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and show that large genomic reorganizations, coinciding with bursts of transposon-mediated repeat expansions, were crucial for the post-Ss4R rediploidization process. Comparisons of duplicate gene expression patterns across a wide range of tissues with orthologous genes from a pre-Ss4R outgroup unexpectedly demonstrate far more instances of neofunctionalization than subfunctionalization. Surprisingly, we find…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Evolutionary redesign of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) Toll-like receptor repertoire by gene losses and expansions.

Genome sequencing of the teleost Atlantic cod demonstrated loss of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II, an extreme gene expansion of MHC class I and gene expansions and losses in the innate pattern recognition receptor (PRR) family of Toll-like receptors (TLR). In a comparative genomic setting, using an improved version of the genome, we characterize PRRs in Atlantic cod with emphasis on TLRs demonstrating the loss of TLR1/6, TLR2 and TLR5 and expansion of TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, TLR22 and TLR25. We find that Atlantic cod TLR expansions are strongly influenced by diversifying selection likely to increase the detectable ligand…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Microsatellite length scoring by Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing – Effects of sequence structure and PCR regime.

Microsatellites are DNA sequences consisting of repeated, short (1-6 bp) sequence motifs that are highly mutable by enzymatic slippage during replication. Due to their high intrinsic variability, microsatellites have important applications in population genetics, forensics, genome mapping, as well as cancer diagnostics and prognosis. The current analytical standard for microsatellites is based on length scoring by high precision electrophoresis, but due to increasing efficiency next-generation sequencing techniques may provide a viable alternative. Here, we evaluated single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing, implemented in the PacBio series of sequencing apparatuses, as a means of microsatellite length scoring. To this end we…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus.

A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55?Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Halomonas sp. R5-57.

The marine Arctic isolate Halomonas sp. R5-57 was sequenced as part of a bioprospecting project which aims to discover novel enzymes and organisms from low-temperature environments, with potential uses in biotechnological applications. Phenotypically, Halomonas sp. R5-57 exhibits high salt tolerance over a wide range of temperatures and has extra-cellular hydrolytic activities with several substrates, indicating it secretes enzymes which may function in high salinity conditions. Genome sequencing identified the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the osmoprotectant ectoine, which has applications in food processing and pharmacy, as well as those involved in production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, which can serve as precursors…

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