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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Aquella oligotrophica gen. nov. sp. nov.: A new member of the family Neisseriaceae isolated from laboratory tap water.

A bacterial strain designated as P08T was isolated from laboratory tap water during a water quality assessment in University of Malaya, Malaysia. The strain was a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, nonmotile, and aerobic bacterium. Complete genome of P08T comprised of a 2,820,660 bp chromosome with a G + C content of 36.43%. Both 16S rRNA phylogeny and phylogenetic tree inferred from the core gene matrix demonstrated that P08T formed a hitherto unknown subline within the family Neisseriaceae. Ortho average nucleotide identity (OrthoANI) values and the percentage of conserved proteins (POCP) calculated from complete genome sequence indicated low relatedness between P08T and its phylogenetic neighbors. Respiratory…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Multi-platform discovery of haplotype-resolved structural variation in human genomes.

The incomplete identification of structural variants (SVs) from whole-genome sequencing data limits studies of human genetic diversity and disease association. Here, we apply a suite of long-read, short-read, strand-specific sequencing technologies, optical mapping, and variant discovery algorithms to comprehensively analyze three trios to define the full spectrum of human genetic variation in a haplotype-resolved manner. We identify 818,054 indel variants (

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Discovery of new genes involved in curli production by a uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain from the highly virulent O45:K1:H7 lineage.

Curli are bacterial surface-associated amyloid fibers that bind to the dye Congo red (CR) and facilitate uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) biofilm formation and protection against host innate defenses. Here we sequenced the genome of the curli-producing UPEC pyelonephritis strain MS7163 and showed it belongs to the highly virulent O45:K1:H7 neonatal meningitis-associated clone. MS7163 produced curli at human physiological temperature, and this correlated with biofilm growth, resistance of sessile cells to the human cationic peptide cathelicidin, and enhanced colonization of the mouse bladder. We devised a forward genetic screen using CR staining as a proxy for curli production and identified 41…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Cloning and characterization of short-chain N-acyl homoserine lactone-producing Enterobacter asburiae strain L1 from lettuce leaves.

In gram-negative bacteria, bacterial communication or quorum sensing (QS) is achieved using common signaling molecules known as N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL). We have previously reported the genome of AHL-producing bacterium, Enterobacter asburiae strain L1. In silico analysis of the strain L1 genome revealed the presence of a pair of luxI/R genes responsible for AHL-type QS, designated as easIR. In this work, the 639 bp luxI homolog, encoding 212 amino acids, have been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3)pLysS. The purified protein (~25 kDa) shares high similarity to several members of the LuxI family among different E asburiae strains. Our findings showed…

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Saturday, September 21, 2019

A Sequel to Sanger: amplicon sequencing that scales.

Although high-throughput sequencers (HTS) have largely displaced their Sanger counterparts, the short read lengths and high error rates of most platforms constrain their utility for amplicon sequencing. The present study tests the capacity of single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing implemented on the SEQUEL platform to overcome these limitations, employing 658 bp amplicons of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene as a model system.By examining templates from more than 5000 species and 20,000 specimens, the performance of SMRT sequencing was tested with amplicons showing wide variation in GC composition and varied sequence attributes. SMRT and Sanger sequences were very similar, but…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

The complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli EC958: a high quality reference sequence for the globally disseminated multidrug resistant E. coli O25b:H4-ST131 clone.

Escherichia coli ST131 is now recognised as a leading contributor to urinary tract and bloodstream infections in both community and clinical settings. Here we present the complete, annotated genome of E. coli EC958, which was isolated from the urine of a patient presenting with a urinary tract infection in the Northwest region of England and represents the most well characterised ST131 strain. Sequencing was carried out using the Pacific Biosciences platform, which provided sufficient depth and read-length to produce a complete genome without the need for other technologies. The discovery of spurious contigs within the assembly that correspond to site-specific…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Molecular analysis of asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain VR50 reveals adaptation to the urinary tract by gene acquisition.

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infectious diseases of humans, with Escherichia coli responsible for >80% of all cases. One extreme of UTI is asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU), which occurs as an asymptomatic carrier state that resembles commensalism. To understand the evolution and molecular mechanisms that underpin ABU, the genome of the ABU E. coli strain VR50 was sequenced. Analysis of the complete genome indicated that it most resembles E. coli K-12, with the addition of a 94-kb genomic island (GI-VR50-pheV), eight prophages, and multiple plasmids. GI-VR50-pheV has a mosaic structure and contains genes encoding a number of…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

The complete methylome of Helicobacter pylori UM032.

The genome of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori encodes a large number of DNA methyltransferases (MTases), some of which are shared among many strains, and others of which are unique to a given strain. The MTases have potential roles in the survival of the bacterium. In this study, we sequenced a Malaysian H. pylori clinical strain, designated UM032, by using a combination of PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) and Illumina MiSeq next generation sequencing platforms, and used the SMRT data to characterize the set of methylated bases (the methylome).The N4-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine modifications detected at single-base resolution using SMRT…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Stepwise evolution of pandrug-resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) pose an urgent risk to global human health. CRE that are non-susceptible to all commercially available antibiotics threaten to return us to the pre-antibiotic era. Using Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing we determined the complete genome of a pandrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate, representing the first complete genome sequence of CRE resistant to all commercially available antibiotics. The precise location of acquired antibiotic resistance elements, including mobile elements carrying genes for the OXA-181 carbapenemase, were defined. Intriguingly, we identified three chromosomal copies of an ISEcp1-blaOXA-181 mobile element, one of which has disrupted the mgrB regulatory gene,…

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Lineage-specific methyltransferases define the methylome of the globally disseminated Escherichia coli ST131 clone.

Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a clone of uropathogenic E. coli that has emerged rapidly and disseminated globally in both clinical and community settings. Members of the ST131 lineage from across the globe have been comprehensively characterized in terms of antibiotic resistance, virulence potential, and pathogenicity, but to date nothing is known about the methylome of these important human pathogens. Here we used single-molecule real-time (SMRT) PacBio sequencing to determine the methylome of E. coli EC958, the most-well-characterized completely sequenced ST131 strain. Our analysis of 52,081 methylated adenines in the genome of EC958 discovered three (m6)A methylation motifs that have…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Core genome and plasmidome of the quorum-quenching bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis.

Rhodococcus erythropolis is a worldwide-distributed actinobacterium that exhibits a remarkable metabolic versatility illustrated by its ability to degrade complex compounds, such as quorum-sensing signals N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHLs), phenols, sterols and fuel derivatives. Because of its catabolic properties, R. erythropolis strains are proposed as anti-biofouling agents against NAHL-dependent biofilms, biocontrol agents against NAHL-emitting plant pathogens, and bioremediation agents in contaminated waters and soils. Here, we used the PacBio technology to resolve the complete genome sequence of the biocontrol strain R. erythropolis R138. Its genome consisted in a circular chromosome (6,236,862 bp), a linear plasmid pLRE138 (477,915 bp) and a circular plasmid pCRE138 (91,729 bp).…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of oxalate-degrading bacterium Pandoraea vervacti DSM 23571(T).

Pandoraea vervacti DSM 23571(T) is an oxalate metabolizing bacterium isolated from an uncultivated field soil in Mugla, Turkey. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of P. vervacti DSM 23571(T). A complete pathway for degradation of oxalate was revealed from the genome analysis. These data are important to path new opportunities for genetic engineering in the field of biotechnology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Dissecting the fungal biology of Bipolaris papendorfii: from phylogenetic to comparative genomic analysis.

Bipolaris papendorfii has been reported as a fungal plant pathogen that rarely causes opportunistic infection in humans. Secondary metabolites isolated from this fungus possess medicinal and anticancer properties. However, its genetic fundamental and basic biology are largely unknown. In this study, we report the first draft genome sequence of B. papendorfii UM 226 isolated from the skin scraping of a patient. The assembled 33.4 Mb genome encodes 11,015 putative coding DNA sequences, of which, 2.49% are predicted transposable elements. Multilocus phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses showed B. papendorfii UM 226 clustering with Curvularia species, apart from other plant pathogenic Bipolaris species.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Insights on quorum-quenching properties of Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain RB21, a Malaysian municipal solid-waste landfill soil isolate, via complete genome sequence analysis.

Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain RB21 is a quorum-quenching bacterium that is able to degrade quorum-sensing signaling molecules. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of L. fusiformis strain RB21. The finished genome is 4.8 Mbp in size, and the quorum-quenching gene was identified. Copyright © 2015 Yong et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome of Jeotgalibacillus malaysiensis D5(T) consisting of a chromosome and a circular megaplasmid.

Jeotgalibacillus spp. are halophilic bacteria within the family Planococcaceae. No genomes of Jeotgalibacillus spp. have been reported to date, and their metabolic pathways are unknown. How the bacteria survive in hypertonic conditions such as seawater is yet to be discovered. As only few studies have been conducted on Jeotgalibacillus spp., potential applications of these bacteria are unknown. Here, we present the complete genome of J. malaysiensis D5(T) (=DSM 28777(T) =KCTC 33350(T)), which is invaluable in identifying interesting applications for this genus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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