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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete Genome Sequence of Spiroplasma phoeniceum Strain P40T, a Plant Pathogen Isolated from Diseased Plants of Madagascar Periwinkle [Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don].

The phytopathogen Spiroplasma phoeniceum was isolated from diseased plants of Madagascar periwinkle [Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don]. Here, we report the nucleotide sequence of the 1,791,576-bp circular chromosome and three plasmids of strain P40T This information serves as a resource for comparative analyses of spiroplasmal adaptations to diverse ecological niches.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Light Modulates the Physiology of Nonphototrophic Actinobacteria.

Light is a source of energy and an environmental cue that is available in excess in most surface environments. In prokaryotic systems, conversion of light to energy by photoautotrophs and photoheterotrophs is well understood, but the conversion of light to information and the cellular response to that information have been characterized in only a few species. Our goal was to explore the response of freshwater Actinobacteria, which are ubiquitous in illuminated aquatic environments, to light. We found that Actinobacteria without functional photosystems grow faster in the light, likely because sugar transport and metabolism are upregulated in the light. Based on…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Chromulinavorax destructans, a pathogen of microzooplankton that provides a window into the enigmatic candidate phylum Dependentiae.

Members of the major candidate phylum Dependentiae (a.k.a. TM6) are widespread across diverse environments from showerheads to peat bogs; yet, with the exception of two isolates infecting amoebae, they are only known from metagenomic data. The limited knowledge of their biology indicates that they have a long evolutionary history of parasitism. Here, we present Chromulinavorax destructans (Strain SeV1) the first isolate of this phylum to infect a representative from a widespread and ecologically significant group of heterotrophic flagellates, the microzooplankter Spumella elongata (Strain CCAP 955/1). Chromulinavorax destructans has a reduced 1.2 Mb genome that is so specialized for infection that…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris 3107, Host for the Model Lactococcal P335 Bacteriophage TP901-1.

The complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris 3107, a dairy starter strain and a host for the model lactococcal P335 bacteriophage TP901-1, is reported here. The circular chromosome of L. lactis subsp. cremoris 3107 is among the smallest genomes of currently sequenced lactococcal strains. L. lactis subsp. cremoris 3107 harbors a complement of six plasmids, which appears to be a reflection of its adaptation to the nutrient-rich dairy environment.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Genome Sequence of Rhizobium jaguaris CCGE525T, a Strain Isolated from Calliandra grandiflora Nodules from a Rain Forest in Mexico.

We present the genome sequence of Rhizobium jaguaris CCGE525T, a nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from nodules of Calliandra grandiflora. CCGE525T belongs to Rhizobium tropici group A, represents the symbiovar calliandrae, and forms nitrogen-fixing nodules in Phaseolus vulgaris. Genome-based metrics and phylogenomic approaches support Rhizobium jaguaris as a novel species.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Pseudoalteromonas piscicida Strains, DE1-A and DE2-A, with Strong Antibacterial Activity against Vibrio vulnificus.

Highly vesiculated Pseudoalteromonas piscicida strains DE1-A and DE2-A were isolated from seawater and show bactericidal properties toward Vibrio vulnificus and other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of these two P. piscicida strains and identify proteolytic enzymes potentially involved in their antibacterial properties.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Analyses of four new Caulobacter Phicbkviruses indicate independent lineages.

Bacteriophages with genomes larger than 200 kbp are considered giant phages, and the giant Phicbkviruses are the most frequently isolated Caulobacter crescentus phages. In this study, we compare six bacteriophage genomes that differ from the genomes of the majority of Phicbkviruses. Four of these genomes are much larger than those of the rest of the Phicbkviruses, with genome sizes that are more than 250 kbp. A comparison of 16 Phicbkvirus genomes identified a ‘core genome’ of 69 genes that is present in all of these Phicbkvirus genomes, as well as shared accessory genes and genes that are unique for each…

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Monday, March 30, 2020

User Group Meeting: New genotype to phenotype associations in viral metagenomes enabled by SMRT Sequencing

In this PacBio User Group Meeting lightning talk, Shawn Polson of the University of Delaware speaks about viral metagenomes, which are more challenging to distinguish than their bacterial counterparts because viruses have no 16S equivalent. By using SMRT Sequencing, his team generated higher-resolution data about viral genomes and aims to use this information as a guide to how these genomes function.

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Improved performance of the PacBio SMRT technology for 16S rDNA sequencing.

Improved sequencing accuracy was obtained with 16S amplicons from environmental samples and a known pure culture when upgraded Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) hardware and enzymes were used for the single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing platform. The new PacBio RS II system with P4/C2 chemistry, when used with previously constructed libraries (Mosher et al., 2013) surpassed the accuracy of Roche/454 pyrosequencing platform. With accurate read lengths of >1400 base pairs, the PacBio system opens up the possibility of identifying microorganisms to the species level in environmental samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

PHASIS: A computational suite for de novo discovery and characterization of phased, siRNA-generating loci and their miRNA triggers

Phased, secondary siRNAs (phasiRNAs) are found widely in plants, from protein-coding transcripts and long, non-coding RNAs; animal piRNAs are also phased. Integrated methods characterizing textquotedblleftPHAStextquotedblright loci are unavailable, and existing methods are quite limited and inefficient in handling large volumes of sequencing data. The PHASIS suite described here provides complete tools for the computational characterization of PHAS loci, with an emphasis on plants, in which these loci are numerous. Benchmarked comparisons demonstrate that PHASIS is sensitive, highly scalable and fast. Importantly, PHASIS eliminates the requirement of a sequenced genome and PARE/degradome data for discovery of phasiRNAs and their miRNA triggers.

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