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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Genomic and probiotic characterization of SJP-SNU strain of Pichia kudriavzevii.

The yeast strain SJP-SNU was investigated as a probiotic and was characterized with respect to growth temperature, bile salt resistance, hydrogen sulfide reducing activity, intestinal survival ability and chicken embryo pathogenicity. In addition, we determined the complete genomic and mitochondrial sequences of SJP-SNU and conducted comparative genomics analyses. SJP-SNU grew rapidly at 37 °C and formed colonies on MacConkey agar containing bile salt. SJP-SNU reduced hydrogen sulfide produced by Salmonella serotype Enteritidis and, after being fed to 4-week-old chickens, could be isolated from cecal feces. SJP-SNU did not cause mortality in 10-day-old chicken embryos. From 13 initial contigs, 11 were finally…

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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Genomic insights into nematicidal activity of a bacterial endophyte, Raoultella ornithinolytica MG against pine wilt nematode.

Pine wilt disease, caused by the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is one of the most devastating conifer diseases decimating several species of pine trees on a global scale. Here, we report the draft genome of Raoultella ornithinolytica MG, which is isolated from mountain-cultivated ginseng plant as an bacterial endophyte and shows nematicidal activity against B. xylophilus. Our analysis of R. ornithinolytica MG genome showed that it possesses many genes encoding potential nematicidal factors in addition to some secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters that may contribute to the observed nematicidal activity of the strain. Furthermore, the genome was lacking key components of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Clostridium perfringens CBA7123 isolated from a faecal sample from Korea.

Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes necrotic enteritis, mild diarrhea, clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene, sepsis, etc. In this study, we aim to determine the pathogenesis of this bacterium at the genomic level. The genome of strain CBA7123 was sequenced, and a comparative genomic analysis between strain CBA7123 and four other related C. perfringens strains was performed.The genome of strain CBA7123 consisted of one circular chromosome and one plasmid that were 3,088,370 and 46,640 bp long with 28.5 and 27.1 mol% G+C content, respectively. The genomic DNA was predicted to contain 2798 open reading frames (ORFs), 10 rRNA genes,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of an endophytic fungus, Gaeumannomyces sp. strain JS-464, isolated from a reed plant, Phragmites communis.

An endophytic fungus, Gaeumannomyces sp. strain JS-464, is capable of producing a number of secondary metabolites which showed significant nitric oxide reduction activity. The draft genome assembly has a size of 53,151,282 bp, with a G+C content of 53.11% consisting of 80 scaffolds with an N50 of 7.46 Mbp. Copyright © 2017 Kim et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a commensal bacterium, Hafnia alvei CBA7124, isolated from human feces.

Members of the genus Hafnia have been isolated from the feces of mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish, as well as from soil, water, sewage, and foods. Hafnia alvei is an opportunistic pathogen that has been implicated in intestinal and extraintestinal infections in humans. However, its pathogenicity is still unclear. In this study, we isolated H. alvei from human feces and performed sequencing as well as comparative genomic analysis to better understand its pathogenicity.The genome of H. alvei CBA7124 comprised a single circular chromosome with 4,585,298 bp and a GC content of 48.8%. The genome contained 25 rRNA genes (9 5S rRNA…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Aspergillus persii NIBRFGC000004109, which has antibacterial activity against plant-pathogenic bacteria.

The fungus Aspergillus persii strain NIBRFGC000004109 is capable of producing penicillic acid and showed antibacterial activity against various plant-pathogenic bacteria, including Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni. Here, we report the first draft whole-genome sequence of A. persii The assembly comprises 38,414,373 bp, with 12 scaffolds. Copyright © 2017 Kim et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic analysis of Bacillus licheniformis CBA7126 isolated from a human fecal sample.

Bacillus licheniformis is a Gram-positive, endospore-forming, saprophytic organism that occurs in plant and soil (Veith et al., 2004). A taxonomical approach shows that it is closely related to Bacillus subtilis (Lapidus et al., 2002; Xu and Côte, 2003; Rey et al., 2004). Generally, most bacilli are predominantly aerobic; however, B. licheniformis is a facultative anaerobe compared to other bacilli in ecological niches (Alexander, 1977). The commercial utility of the extracellular products of B. licheniformis makes this microorganism an economically interesting species (Kovács et al., 2009). For example, B. licheniformis is used industrially for manufacturing biochemicals, enzymes, antibiotics, and aminopeptidase. Several…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic analysis of a pathogenic bacterium, Paeniclostridium sordellii CBA7122 containing the highest number of rRNA operons, isolated from a human stool sample.

Paeniclostridium sordellii was first isolated by Alfredo Sordelli in 1922 under the proposed name Bacillus oedematis, and was then renamed Bacillus sordellii in 1927 (Hall and Scott, 1927). Two years later, it was classified as Clostridium sordellii (Hall et al., 1929). Recently, this bacterium was reclassified as a species of the genus Paeniclostridium, named P. sordellii comb. nov. (Sasi Jyothsna et al., 2016). P. sordellii is an anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming rod bacterium with flagella. Most strains are non-pathogenic, but some strains have been associated with severe infections of humans and animals. In humans, P. sordellii is mainly associated with trauma,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus altitudinis P-10, a potential bioprotectant against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, isolated from rice rhizosphere in Java, Indonesia.

Bacillus altitudinis P-10 was isolated from the rhizosphere of rice grown in an organic rice field and provides strong antagonism against the bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in rice. Herein, we provide the complete genome sequence and a possible explanation of the antibiotic function of the P-10 strain.

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