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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of oyster isolate Vibrio vulnificus env1.

Vibrio vulnificus, a ubiquitous inhabitant of coastal marine environments, has been isolated from a variety of sources. It is an opportunistic pathogen of both marine animals and humans. Here, the genome sequence of V. vulnificus Env1, an environmental isolate resistant to predation by the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis, is reported. Copyright © 2018 Noorian et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of Canadian epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains CMRSA3 and CMRSA6.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 8 (CC8) sequence type 239 (ST239) represents a predominant hospital-associated MRSA sublineage present worldwide. The Canadian epidemic MRSA strains CMRSA3 and CMRSA6 are moderately virulent members of this group but are closely related to the highly virulent strain TW20. Whole-genome sequencing of CMRSA3 and CMRSA6 was conducted to identify genetic determinants associated with their virulence.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

New reference genome sequences for 17 bacterial strains of the honey bee gut microbiota.

We sequenced the genomes of 17 strains isolated from the gut of honey bees, including strains representing the genera Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Gilliamella, Snodgrassella, Frischella, and Commensalibacter. These genome sequences represent an important step forward in the development of a comprehensive reference database to aid future analysis of this emerging gut microbiota model.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Transposon insertion sequencing elucidates novel gene involvement in susceptibility and resistance to phages T4 and T7 in Escherichia coli O157.

Experiments using bacteriophage (phage) to infect bacterial strains have helped define some basic genetic concepts in microbiology, but our understanding of the complexity of bacterium-phage interactions is still limited. As the global threat of antibiotic resistance continues to increase, phage therapy has reemerged as an attractive alternative or supplement to treating antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. Further, the long-used method of phage typing to classify bacterial strains is being replaced by molecular genetic techniques. Thus, there is a growing need for a complete understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms underpinning phage-bacterium interactions to optimize phage therapy for the clinic as well as…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Kocuria rhizophila BT304, isolated from the small intestine of castrated beef cattle.

Members of the species Kocuria rhizophila, belonging to the family Micrococcaceae in the phylum Actinobacteria, have been isolated from a wide variety of natural sources, such as soil, freshwater, fish gut, and clinical specimens. K. rhizophila is important from an industrial viewpoint, because the bacterium grows rapidly with high cell density and exhibits robustness at various growth conditions. However, the bacterium is an opportunistic pathogen involved in human infections. Here, we sequenced and analyzed the genome of the K. rhizophila strain BT304, isolated from the small intestine of adult castrated beef cattle.The genome of K. rhizophila BT304 consisted of a…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the Robinia pseudoacacia L. symbiont Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123.

Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 was isolated in 2006, from effective nodules of Robinia pseudoacacia L. grown in lead-zinc mine tailing site, in Gansu Province, China. M. amorphae CCNWGS0123 is an aerobic, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod strain. This paper characterized M. amorphae CCNWGS0123 and presents its complete genome sequence information and genome annotation. The 7,374,589 bp long genome which encodes 7136 protein-coding genes and 63 RNA coding genes, contains one chromosome and four plasmids. Moreover, a chromosome with no gaps was assembled.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomic analysis of Staphylococcus lugdunensis shows a closed pan-genome and multiple barriers to horizontal gene transfer.

Coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) are commensal bacteria on human skin. Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a unique CoNS which produces various virulence factors and may, like S. aureus, cause severe infections, particularly in hospital settings. Unlike other staphylococci, it remains highly susceptible to antimicrobials, and genome-based phylogenetic studies have evidenced a highly conserved genome that distinguishes it from all other staphylococci.We demonstrate that S. lugdunensis possesses a closed pan-genome with a very limited number of new genes, in contrast to other staphylococci that have an open pan-genome. Whole-genome nucleotide and amino acid identity levels are also higher than in other staphylococci. We…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

New variant of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium associated with invasive disease in immunocompromised patients in Vietnam.

Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS), particularly Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, is among the leading etiologic agents of bacterial enterocolitis globally and a well-characterized cause of invasive disease (iNTS) in sub-Saharan Africa. In contrast, S Typhimurium is poorly defined in Southeast Asia, a known hot spot for zoonotic disease with a recently described burden of iNTS disease. Here, we aimed to add insight into the epidemiology and potential impact of zoonotic transfer and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in S Typhimurium associated with iNTS and enterocolitis in Vietnam. We performed whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction on 85 human (enterocolitis, carriage, and iNTS) and 113 animal S Typhimurium isolates…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

One complete and three draft genome sequences of four Brochothrix thermosphacta strains, CD 337, TAP 175, BSAS1 3 and EBP 3070.

Brochothrix thermosphacta is one of the dominant bacterial species associated with spoilage of chilled meat and seafood products through the production of various metabolites responsible for off-odors. However, metabolic pathways leading to meat and seafood spoilage are not all well known. The production of spoiling molecules seems to depend both on strains and on food matrix. Several B. thermosphacta genome sequences have been reported, all issued from meat isolates. Here, we report four genome sequences, one complete and three as drafts. The four B. thermosphacta strains CD 337, TAP 175, BSAS1 3, and EBP 3070 were isolated from different ecological…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Arcticibacterium luteifluviistationis SM1504 T, a cytophagaceae bacterium isolated from Arctic surface seawater

Arcticibacterium luteifluviistationis SM1504Twas isolated from Arctic surface seawater and classified as a novel genus of the phylum Bacteroides. To date, no Arcticibacterium genomes have been reported, their genomic compositions and metabolic features are still unknown. Here, we reported the complete genome sequence of A. luteifluviistationis SM1504T, which comprises 5,379,839bp with an average GC content of 37.20%. Genes related to various stress (such as radiation, osmosis and antibiotics) resistance and gene clusters coding for carotenoid and flexirubin biosynthesis were detected in the genome. Moreover, the genome contained a 245-kb genomic island and a 15-kb incomplete prophage region. A great percentage of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Deciphering mixotrophic Clostridium formicoaceticum metabolism and energy conservation: Genomic analysis and experimental studies.

Clostridium formicoaceticum, a Gram-negative mixotrophic homoacetogen, produces acetic acid as the sole metabolic product from various carbon sources, including fructose, glycerol, formate, and CO2. Its genome of 4.59-Mbp contains a highly conserved Wood-Ljungdahl pathway gene cluster with the same layout as that in other mixotrophic acetogens, including Clostridium aceticum, Clostridium carboxidivorans, and Clostridium ljungdahlii. For energy conservation, C. formicoaceticum does not have all the genes required for the synthesis of cytochrome or quinone used for generating proton gradient in H+-dependent acetogens such as Moorella thermoacetica; instead, it has the Rnf system and a Na+-translocating ATPase similar to the one in…

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