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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Insights into the bacterial species and communities of a full-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic wastewater treatment plant by using third-generation sequencing.

For the first time, full-length 16S rRNA sequencing method was applied to disclose the bacterial species and communities of a full-scale wastewater treatment plant using an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A/A/O) process in Wuhan, China. The compositions of the bacteria at phylum and class levels in the activated sludge were similar to which revealed by Illumina Miseq sequencing. At genus and species levels, third-generation sequencing showed great merits and accuracy. Typical functional taxa classified to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), denitrifying bacteria (DB), anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria (ANAMMOXB) and polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) were presented, which were Nitrosomonas (1.11%), Nitrospira (3.56%), Pseudomonas (3.88%),…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Plantibacter flavus, Curtobacterium herbarum, Paenibacillus taichungensis, and Rhizobium selenitireducens Endophytes Provide Host-Specific Growth Promotion of Arabidopsis thaliana, Basil, Lettuce, and Bok Choy Plants.

A collection of bacterial endophytes isolated from stem tissues of plants growing in soils highly contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons were screened for plant growth-promoting capabilities. Twenty-seven endophytic isolates significantly improved the growth of Arabidopsis thaliana plants in comparison to that of uninoculated control plants. The five most beneficial isolates, one strain each of Curtobacterium herbarum, Paenibacillus taichungensis, and Rhizobium selenitireducens and two strains of Plantibacter flavus were further examined for growth promotion in Arabidopsis, lettuce, basil, and bok choy plants. Host-specific plant growth promotion was observed when plants were inoculated with the five bacterial strains. P. flavus strain M251 increased…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Whole Genome Sequencing and Analysis of Chlorimuron-Ethyl Degrading Bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae 2N3.

Klebsiella pneumoniae 2N3 is a strain of gram-negative bacteria that can degrade chlorimuron-ethyl and grow with chlorimuron-ethyl as the sole nitrogen source. The complete genome of Klebsiella pneumoniae 2N3 was sequenced using third generation high-throughput DNA sequencing technology. The genomic size of strain 2N3 was 5.32 Mb with a GC content of 57.33% and a total of 5156 coding genes and 112 non-coding RNAs predicted. Two hydrolases expressed by open reading frames (ORFs) 0934 and 0492 were predicted and experimentally confirmed by gene knockout to be involved in the degradation of chlorimuron-ethyl. Strains of ?ORF 0934, ?ORF 0492, and wild…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Genome Sequence of the Black Yeast Exophiala lecanii-corni.

The genome sequence of Exophiala lecanii-corni, a melanized dimorphic fungus with the capability of degrading several volatile organic compounds, was sequenced using PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing to assist with understanding the molecular basis of its uncommon morphological and metabolic characteristics. The assembled draft genome is presented here.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

The whole genome insight on condition-specific redox activity and arsenopyrite interaction promoting As-mobilization by strain Lysinibacillus sp. B2A1.

A gram-positive spore former, Lysinibacillus sp. B2A1 was isolated from a high arsenic containing groundwater of Beimen2A well, Chianan Plain area, Southwestern Taiwan. Noteworthy, in the subsurface-mimicking anoxic incubation with a Na-lactate amendment system, this isolate could interact with arsenic-source mineral arsenopyrite and enhance arsenic mobilization. Further, the isolate showed elevated levels of arsenic resistance, 200?mM and 7.5?mM for arsenate and arsenite, respectively. Lysinibacillus sp. B2A1 demonstrated condition-specific redox activities including salient oxic oxidation of arsenite and anoxic reduction of arsenate. The elevated rate of As(III) oxidation (Vmax?=?0.13 µM min-1 per 106 cells, Km?=?15.3 µM) under oxic conditions was potent.…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Characterization of the genome of a Nocardia strain isolated from soils in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau that specifically degrades crude oil and of this biodegradation.

A strain of Nocardia isolated from crude oil-contaminated soils in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau degrades nearly all components of crude oil. This strain was identified as Nocardia soli Y48, and its growth conditions were determined. Complete genome sequencing showed that N. soli Y48 has a 7.3?Mb genome and many genes responsible for hydrocarbon degradation, biosurfactant synthesis, emulsification and other hydrocarbon degradation-related metabolisms. Analysis of the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) and genomic islands (GIs) revealed that Y48 has undergone significant gene transfer events to adapt to changing environmental conditions (crude oil contamination). The structural features of the genome might provide a…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Carbohydrate catabolic capability of a Flavobacteriia bacterium isolated from hadal water.

Flavobacteriia are abundant in many marine environments including hadal waters, as demonstrated recently. However, it is unclear how this flavobacterial population adapts to hadal conditions. In this study, extensive comparative genomic analyses were performed for the flavobacterial strain Euzebyella marina RN62 isolated from the Mariana Trench hadal water in low abundance. The complete genome of RN62 possessed a considerable number of carbohydrate-active enzymes with a different composition. There was a predominance of GH family 13 proteins compared to closely related relatives, suggesting that RN62 has preserved a certain capacity for carbohydrate utilization and that the hadal ocean may hold an…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Effect of sulfur-iron modified biochar on the available cadmium and bacterial community structure in contaminated soils.

Cadmium contamination in paddy soils has aroused increasing concern around the world, and biochar has many positive properties, such as large specific surface areas, micro porous structure for the heavy metal immobilization in soils. However there are few studies on sulfur-iron modified biochar as well as its microbiology effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Cd immobilization effects of sulfur or sulfur-iron modified biochar and its related microbial community changes in Cd-contaminated soils. SEM-EDX analysis confirmed that sulfur and iron were loaded on the raw biochar successfully. Sulfur-modified biochar (S-BC) and sulfur-iron modified biochar (SF-BC) addition increased…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

The complete genome sequence of the denitrifying bacterium Marinobacter sp. Arc7-DN-1 isolated from Arctic Ocean sediment

The general features and genome characteristics of the denitrifying bacterium Marinobacter sp. Arc7-DN-1, isolated from Arctic Ocean sediment, are described. Marinobacter sp. Arc7-DN-1 uses NO3- or NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source to grow at low temperatures. The strain can grow at a wide range of temperatures (0–30?°C) and NaCl concentration (15–90‰). The genome has one circular chromosome of 4,300,456?bp (57.64?mol%?G?+?C content), consisting of 4012 coding genes, including 50 tRNAs and three rRNA operons as 16S-23S-5S rRNA. On the basis of the KEGG analysis, strain Arc7-DN-1 encodes 43 proteins related to nitrogen metabolism, including a complete denitrifying pathway and an…

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