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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of lanthionine-producing Lactobacillus brevis strain 100D8, generated by PacBio sequencing.

Lactobacillus brevis strain 100D8 was isolated from rye silage and showed rapid acidification ability in vitro and antifungal activity against mycotoxin- producing fungi. We report here the complete genome sequence of L. brevis strain 100D8, which has a circular chromosome (2,351,988 bp, 2,304 coding sequences [CDSs]) and three plasmids (45,061 bp, 57 CDSs; 40,740 bp, 40 CDSs; and 39,943 bp, 57 CDSs).

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The gold-standard genome of Aspergillus niger NRRL 3 enables a detailed view of the diversity of sugar catabolism in fungi.

The fungal kingdom is too large to be discovered exclusively by classical genetics. The access to omics data opens a new opportunity to study the diversity within the fungal kingdom and how adaptation to new environments shapes fungal metabolism. Genomes are the foundation of modern science but their quality is crucial when analysing omics data. In this study, we demonstrate how one gold-standard genome can improve functional prediction across closely related species to be able to identify key enzymes, reactions and pathways with the focus on primary carbon metabolism. Based on this approach we identified alternative genes encoding various steps…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Methanogenic and bacterial endosymbionts of free-living anaerobic ciliates

Trimyema compressum thrives in anoxic freshwater environments in which it preys on bacteria and grows with fermentative metabolisms. Like many anaerobic protozoa, instead of mitochondria, T. compressum possess hydrogenosomes, which are hydrogen-producing, energy-generating organelles characteristic of anaerobic protozoa and fungi. The cytoplasm of T. compressum harbours hydrogenotrophic methanogens that consume the hydrogen produced by hydrogenosome, which confers an energetic advantage to the host ciliate. Symbiotic associations between methanogenic archaea and Trimyema ciliates are thought to be established independently and/or repeatedly in their evolutional history. In addition to methanogenic symbionts, T. compressum houses bacterial symbiont TC1 whose function is unknown in…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus koreensis 26-25, a ginsenoside converting bacterium, isolated from Korean kimchi

A Gram-positive, rod-shaped, ivory colored, and motile, Lactobacillus koreensis 26-25 was isolated from Korean kimchi. Strain 26-25 showed the ability of conversion from major ginsenosides into minor ginsenosides for which whole genome was sequenced. The whole genome sequence of Lactobacillus koreensis 26-25 consisted of one circular chromosome comprised of 3,006,812 bp, with a DNA G + C content of 49.23%. The whole genome analysis of strain 26-25 showed many glycosides hydrolase genes, which may contribute to identify the genes responsible for transformation of major ginsenosides into minor ginsenosides for its high pharmacological effects.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Olsenella sp. KGMB 04489 isolated from healthy Korean human feces

The genus of Olsenella has been isolated from vertebrate animal mouth, rumen, and feces. Olsenella sp. KGMB 04489 was isolated from fecal samples obtained from a healthy Korean. The whole-genome sequence of Olsenella sp. KGMB 04489 was analyzed using the PacBio Sequel platform. The genome comprises a 2,108,034 bp chromosome with a G + C content of 65.50%, 1,838 total genes, 13 rRNA genes, and 52 tRNA genes. Also, we found that strain KGMB 04489 had some genes for hydrolysis enzymes, and antibiotic biosynthesis and resistance in its genome based on the result of genome analysis.

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