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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Lepidoptera genomes: current knowledge, gaps and future directions.

Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) are one of the most ecologically diverse and speciose insect orders. With recent advances in genomics, new Lepidoptera genomes are regularly being sequenced, and many of them are playing principal roles in genomics studies, particularly in the fields of phylo-genomics and functional genomics. Thus far, assembled genomes are only available for

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Galleria mellonella(greater wax moth).

The larvae of the greater wax moth,Galleria mellonella, are pests of active beehives. In infection biology, these larvae are playing a more and more attractive role as an invertebrate host model. Here, we report on the first genome sequence ofGalleria mellonella. Copyright © 2018 Lange et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Supergene evolution triggered by the introgression of a chromosomal inversion.

Supergenes are groups of tightly linked loci whose variation is inherited as a single Mendelian locus and are a common genetic architecture for complex traits under balancing selection [1-8]. Supergene alleles are long-range haplotypes with numerous mutations underlying distinct adaptive strategies, often maintained in linkage disequilibrium through the suppression of recombination by chromosomal rearrangements [1, 5, 7-9]. However, the mechanism governing the formation of supergenes is not well understood and poses the paradox of establishing divergent functional haplotypes in the face of recombination. Here, we show that the formation of the supergene alleles encoding mimicry polymorphism in the butterfly Heliconius…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome assembly of the sheep scab mite, Psoroptes ovis.

Sheep scab, caused by infestation with Psoroptes ovis, is highly contagious, results in intense pruritus, and represents a major welfare and economic concern. Here, we report the first draft genome assembly and gene prediction of P. ovis based on PacBio de novo sequencing. The ~63.2-Mb genome encodes 12,041 protein-coding genes. Copyright © 2018 Burgess et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Satellite DNA evolution: old ideas, new approaches.

A substantial portion of the genomes of most multicellular eukaryotes consists of large arrays of tandemly repeated sequence, collectively called satellite DNA. The processes generating and maintaining different satellite DNA abundances across lineages are important to understand as satellites have been linked to chromosome mis-segregation, disease phenotypes, and reproductive isolation between species. While much theory has been developed to describe satellite evolution, empirical tests of these models have fallen short because of the challenges in assessing satellite repeat regions of the genome. Advances in computational tools and sequencing technologies now enable identification and quantification of satellite sequences genome-wide. Here, we…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A draft genome sequence for the Ixodes scapularis cell line, ISE6

Background: The tick cell line ISE6, derived from Ixodes scapularis, is commonly used for amplification and detection of arboviruses in environmental or clinical samples. Methods: To assist with sequence-based assays, we sequenced the ISE6 genome with single-molecule, long-read technology. Results: The draft assembly appears near complete based on gene content analysis, though it appears to lack some instances of repeats in this highly repetitive genome. The assembly appears to have separated the haplotypes at many loci. DNA short read pairs, used for validation only, mapped to the cell line assembly at a higher rate than they mapped to the Ixodes…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The regenerative flatworm Macrostomum lignano, a model organism with high experimental potential.

Understanding the process of regeneration has been one of the longstanding scientific aims, from a fundamental biological perspective, as well as within the applied context of regenerative medicine. Because regeneration competence varies greatly between organisms, it is essential to investigate different experimental animals. The free-living marine flatworm Macrostomum lignano is a rising model organism for this type of research, and its power stems from a unique set of biological properties combined with amenability to experimental manipulation. The biological properties of interest include production of single-cell fertilized eggs, a transparent body, small size, short generation time, ease of culture, the presence…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomics, GPCRs and new targets for the control of insect pests and vectors.

The pressing need for new pest control products with novel modes of action has spawned interest in small molecules and peptides targeting arthropod GPCRs. Genome sequence data and tools for reverse genetics have enabled the prediction and characterization of GPCRs from many invertebrates. We review recent work to identify, characterize and de-orphanize arthropod GPCRs, with a focus on studies that reveal exciting new functional roles for these receptors, including the regulation of metabolic resistance. We explore the potential for insecticides targeting Class A biogenic amine-binding and peptide-binding receptors, and consider the innovation required to generate pest-selective leads for development, within…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

An investigation of Y chromosome incorporations in 400 species of Drosophila and related genera.

Y chromosomes are widely believed to evolve from a normal autosome through a process of massive gene loss (with preservation of some male genes), shaped by sex-antagonistic selection and complemented by occasional gains of male-related genes. The net result of these processes is a male-specialized chromosome. This might be expected to be an irreversible process, but it was found in 2005 that the Drosophila pseudoobscura Y chromosome was incorporated into an autosome. Y chromosome incorporations have important consequences: a formerly male-restricted chromosome reverts to autosomal inheritance, and the species may shift from an XY/XX to X0/XX sex-chromosome system. In order…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

De novo genome assembly of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae) developed through a combination of linked-reads and long-read technologies

Long-read sequencing has greatly contributed to the generation of high quality assemblies, albeit at a high cost. It is also not always clear how to combine sequencing platforms. We sequenced the genome of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), the most important pest in the olive fruits agribusiness industry, using Illumina short-reads, mate-pairs, 10x Genomics linked-reads, Pacific Biosciences (PacBio), and Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT). The 10x linked-reads assembly gave the most contiguous assembly with an N50 of 2.16 Mb. Scaffolding the linked-reads assembly using long-reads from ONT gave a more contiguous assembly with scaffold N50 of 4.59 Mb. We also…

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