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Thursday, August 27, 2020

Case Study: Assembling high-quality human genomes – Beyond the ‘$1,000 genome’

Scientists from WashU, Macrogen, and Mount Sinai are using long-read sequencing with single-molecule, next-generation genome mapping to create gold-quality de novo assemblies of human genomes. Unbiased de novo assembled genomes also highlight the substantial amount of structural variation unique to individuals and populations, which cannot be accessed by short-read technologies that use a reference-based re-sequencing approach.

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Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Webinar: Understanding SARS-CoV-2 and host immune response to COVID-19 with PacBio sequencing

Studying microbial genomics and infectious disease? Learn how the PacBio Sequel II System can help advance your research, with first-hand perspectives from scientists who are investigating SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19. In this webinar, Melissa Laird-Smith (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine) discusses her work evaluating the impact of host immune restriction in health and disease with high resolution HLA typing. She is joined by Corey Watson (University of Louisville School of Medicine) who talks about overcoming complexity to elucidate the role of IGH haplotype diversity in antibody-mediated immunity. Hosted by Meredith Ashby, Director of Microbial Genomics at PacBio. Access additional PacBio resources…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Characterization of Reference Materials for Genetic Testing of CYP2D6 Alleles: A GeT-RM Collaborative Project.

Pharmacogenetic testing increasingly is available from clinical and research laboratories. However, only a limited number of quality control and other reference materials currently are available for the complex rearrangements and rare variants that occur in the CYP2D6 gene. To address this need, the Division of Laboratory Systems, CDC-based Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination Program, in collaboration with members of the pharmacogenetic testing and research communities and the Coriell Cell Repositories (Camden, NJ), has characterized 179 DNA samples derived from Coriell cell lines. Testing included the recharacterization of 137 genomic DNAs that were genotyped in previous Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Deciphering bacterial epigenomes using modern sequencing technologies.

Prokaryotic DNA contains three types of methylation: N6-methyladenine, N4-methylcytosine and 5-methylcytosine. The lack of tools to analyse the frequency and distribution of methylated residues in bacterial genomes has prevented a full understanding of their functions. Now, advances in DNA sequencing technology, including single-molecule, real-time sequencing and nanopore-based sequencing, have provided new opportunities for systematic detection of all three forms of methylated DNA at a genome-wide scale and offer unprecedented opportunities for achieving a more complete understanding of bacterial epigenomes. Indeed, as the number of mapped bacterial methylomes approaches 2,000, increasing evidence supports roles for methylation in regulation of gene expression,…

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Monday, March 30, 2020

Webinar: Complete genomes within reach – Closing bacterial genomes from the lakes of Minnesota to NYC hospitals

In this webinar, Ben Auch, Research Scientist, Innovation Lab, University of Minnesota Genomics Center, Cody Sheik, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Minnesota Duluth, and Harm van Bakel, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai provide details of the newly updated microbial whole genome sequencing pipeline, which leverages the multiplexing capabilities of the Sequel System, share new insights into the ecophysiology of Minnesota microbes using long-read sequencing, and show of how whole genome sequencing is used in pathogen surveillance programs at hospitals.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

User Group Meeting: Targeted PacBio Sequencing using Sage HLS-CATCH

In this PacBio User Group Meeting presentation, Mount Sinai’s Ethan Ellis presents results from the HLS-CATCH method, which involves the use of the SageHLS instrument with CRISPR design methods to target and extract large genomic fragments for sequencing while avoiding pseudogenes and other confounding regions.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

Webinar: Sequencing 101 – How long-read sequencing improves access to genetic information

In this webinar, Kristin Mars, Sequencing Specialist, PacBio, presents an introduction to PacBio’s technology and its applications followed by a panel discussion among sequencing experts. The panel discussion addresses such things as what long reads are and how are they useful, what differentiates PacBio long-read sequencing from other technologies, and the applications PacBio offers and how they can benefit scientific research.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Highlighting unexplored genomic regions with SMRT Sequencing – informatics for structural event detection in PacBio

Ali Bashir from the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at Mount Sinai describes a tool to detect tandem repeats (PACMonSTR), which he believes are dramatically underrepresented in the human genome reference but that can be discovered with PacBio sequencing. In a collaboration with Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Cornell, Bashir and his team generated shotgun, whole-genome sequence data from human genomic DNA using PacBio sequencing. Their goal was to find structural variation features that are not present in the existing reference. He shows numerous examples wherein the long PacBio reads were able to resolve inversions in the sample,…

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Monday, March 30, 2020

AGBT Roche and PacBio Workshop: Leveraging SMRT Sequencing technology for developing niche assays with diagnostic potential

Robert Sebra reports the use of SMRT Sequencing at the Icahn Institute and presents some early data from the new Sequel System. Topics include: Targeted sequencing applications for CYP2D6 metabolism and Gaucher disease, tandem repeat detection in FTD/ALS patients, structural variation detection for Goldenhar Syndrome, inverted PCR assays for detection of DNA damage in Glioblastome, whole gene BRCA sequencing, and sensitive somatic variant detection in heterogeneous tissues.

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