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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Staphylococcus carnosus LTH 3730.

Specific strains of the apathogenic coagulase-negative species Staphylococcus carnosus are frequently used as meat starter cultures, as they contribute to color formation and the production of aroma compounds. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of S. carnosus LTH 3730, a strain isolated from a fermented fish product. Copyright © 2016 Müller et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Halomonas sp. R5-57.

The marine Arctic isolate Halomonas sp. R5-57 was sequenced as part of a bioprospecting project which aims to discover novel enzymes and organisms from low-temperature environments, with potential uses in biotechnological applications. Phenotypically, Halomonas sp. R5-57 exhibits high salt tolerance over a wide range of temperatures and has extra-cellular hydrolytic activities with several substrates, indicating it secretes enzymes which may function in high salinity conditions. Genome sequencing identified the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the osmoprotectant ectoine, which has applications in food processing and pharmacy, as well as those involved in production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, which can serve as precursors…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus salivarius LPM01.

Lactobacillus salivarius LPM01 (DSM 22150) is a probiotic strain able to improve health status in immunocompromised people. Here, we report its complete genome sequence deciphered by PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. Analysis of the sequence may provide insights into its functional activity and safety assessment. Copyright © 2016 Chenoll et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Characterization of tet(Y)-carrying LowGC plasmids exogenously captured from cow manure at a conventional dairy farm.

Manure from dairy farms has been shown to contain diverse tetracycline resistance genes that are transferable to soil. Here, we focus on conjugative plasmids that may spread tetracycline resistance at a conventional dairy farm. We performed exogenous plasmid isolation from cattle feces using chlortetracycline for transconjugant selection. The transconjugants obtained harbored LowGC-type plasmids and tet(Y). A representative plasmid (pFK2-7) was fully sequenced and this was compared with previously described LowGC plasmids from piggery manure-treated soil and a GenBank record from Acinetobacter nosocomialis that we also identified as a LowGC plasmid. The pFK2-7 plasmid had the conservative backbone typical of LowGC…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a VIM-1- producing Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis isolate derived from minced pork meat.

Carbapenems are considered last-resort antibiotics used to treat human infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. In 2011, VIM-1 carbapenemase-producing Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis strains were isolated from livestock for the first time in Germany. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the first German blaVIM-1-harboring Salmonella Infantis isolate (15-SA01028) originating from food. Copyright © 2018 Borowiak et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative analysis of core genome MLST and SNP typing within a European Salmonella serovar Enteritidis outbreak.

Multi-country outbreaks of foodborne bacterial disease present challenges in their detection, tracking, and notification. As food is increasingly distributed across borders, such outbreaks are becoming more common. This increases the need for high-resolution, accessible, and replicable isolate typing schemes. Here we evaluate a core genome multilocus typing (cgMLST) scheme for the high-resolution reproducible typing of Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) isolates, by its application to a large European outbreak of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. This outbreak had been extensively characterised using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based approaches. The cgMLST analysis was congruent with the original SNP-based analysis, the epidemiological data, and whole…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Interpreting whole-genome sequence analyses of foodborne bacteria for regulatory applications and outbreak investigations.

Whole-genome sequence (WGS) analysis has revolutionized the food safety industry by enabling high-resolution typing of foodborne bacteria. Higher resolving power allows investigators to identify origins of contamination during illness outbreaks and regulatory activities quickly and accurately. Government agencies and industry stakeholders worldwide are now analyzing WGS data routinely. Although researchers have published many studies that assess the efficacy of WGS data analysis for source attribution, guidance for interpreting WGS analyses is lacking. Here, we provide the framework for interpreting WGS analyses used by the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN). We based this framework…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome-wide analysis of the invertase gene family from maize.

The recent release of the maize genome (AGPv4) contains annotation errors of invertase genes and therefore the enzymes are bestly curated manually at the protein level in a comprehensible fashion The synthesis, transport and degradation of sucrose are determining factors for biomass allocation and yield of crop plants. Invertase (INV) is a key enzyme of carbon metabolism in both source and sink tissues. Current releases of the maize genome correctly annotates only two vacuolar invertases (ivr1 and ivr2) and four cell wall invertases (incw1, incw2 (mn1), incw3, and incw4). Our comprehensive survey identified 21 INV isogenes for which we propose…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of historic Clostridioides difficile food-dwelling ribotype 078 strains in Canada identical to that of the historic human clinical strain M120 in the United Kingdom.

Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile is a spore-forming anaerobic bacte- rium that causes severe intestinal diseases in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the first C. difficile foodborne type strain (PCR ribotype 078) isolated from food animals in Canada in 2004, which has 100% similarity to the ge- nome sequence of the historic human clinical strain M120.

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