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Thursday, November 12, 2020

Case Study: Diving Deep – Revealing the mysteries of marine life with SMRT Sequencing

Many scientists are using PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing to explore the genomes and transcriptomes of a wide variety of marine species and ecosystems. These studies are already adding to our understanding of how marine species adapt and evolve, contributing to conservation efforts, and informing how we can optimize food production through efficient aquaculture.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Sequencing and assembly of the rice variety N22 (aus group) – A new reference genome to study comparative, evolutionary and functional genomics of rice

David Kudrna, Rod Wing, and the Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI) plan to fully sequence and annotate the genomes and transcriptomes of 3-4 accessions from each of the estimated 9-15 subpopulation of rice. These subpopulation-specific references will be used to map resequencing data of 3,000 individuals for variation discovery, GWAS, and genomic selection studies to address important traits such as biotic and abiotic stress tolerances, yield, and grain quality. Here Dr. Kudrna presents the first high-quality genome sequence of the rice variety Nagina22. AGI produced and assembled 65-fold coverage of SMRT Sequencing data, resulting in an assembly of 373 Mb with…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: An extreme metabolism: Iso-Seq analysis of the ruby-throated hummingbird transcriptome

Winston Timp from Johns Hopkins University studies the metabolism of hummingbirds, which sustain the highest metabolic rates among all vertebrates. Notably, hummingbirds can switch rapidly between a fuel of lipids to newly ingested sugars. This remarkable metabolism is supported by enzymes which operate at the extreme limit of catalytic efficiency. Understanding the molecular basis of enzymatic action will provide a foundation enabling rational engineering of metabolic circuits in other systems. To do this, Dr. Timp and his team generated a de novo transcriptome of the hummingbird liver using the Iso-Seq method. Characterization of the resulting protein coding sequences provides clues…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Conference: The first African reference genome assembly

Karyn Meltz Steinberg presents the first high quality African reference genome assembly of the Yoruban individual, NA19240, produced from SMRT Sequencing data. She said PacBio sequencing offers significant improvement over short-read sequence data for high-quality assemblies.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Identification and characterization of informative genetic structural variants for neurodegenerative diseases

Michael Lutz, from the Duke University Medical Center, discussed a recently published software tool that can now be used in a pipeline with SMRT Sequencing data to find structural variant biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases with a focus on Alzheimer’s disease, ALS, and Lewy body dementia. His team is particularly interested in short sequence repeats and short tandem repeats, which have already been implicated in neurodegenerative disease.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT PacBio Workshop: High-throughput HLA class I whole gene and HLA class II long range typing on PacBio RSII and Sequel Platforms

In a talk at AGBT 2017, Histogenetics CEO Nezih Cereb reported on how SMRT Sequencing is allowing his team to produce full-length, phased sequences for HLA alleles, which are important for matching organ transplants to recipients. The company is typing thousands of samples per day on their PacBio RS II systems and their new Sequel System. Cereb noted that SMRT Sequencing is unique in its ability to reliably phase mutations in the HLA alleles without imputation. Cereb concluded with his plans to use this approach for other complex regions, such as KIR, and announced their continued increasing HLA typing capacity…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: How SMRT Sequencing is accelerating plant and animal genomics

In this presentation, Justin Blethrow provides an overview of recent and upcoming developments across PacBio’s SMRT Sequencing product portfolio, and their implications for PacBio’s major applications. In presenting the product roadmap, he illustrates how key new products coming in 2019 will make SMRT Sequencing dramatically more affordable and easy to use, and how they will enable customers to routinely produce highly accurate, single-molecule long reads.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Reference-quality drosophila genome assemblies for evolutionary analysis of previously inaccessible genomic regions

In this presentation, Andrew Clark from Cornell University describes work from a collaboration with Manyuan Long of the University of Chicago and Rod Wing of the University of Arizona to look at heterochromatic regions with long simple satellite repeats in drosophila genomes. The group used PacBio sequencing to create new genome assemblies of 10 drosophila species, including de novo assemblies of two individual flies using as little as 26 ng of gDNA.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Webinar: Long-read sequencing and infectious disease: New insights into longstanding challenges

One of the longstanding challenges in infectious disease has been the lack of high-quality reference genomes. However, developments in genome sequencing are helping researchers overcome this barrier. Recently, highly contiguous genome assemblies of Plasmodium falciparum, Aedes aegypti, and multiple trypanosomes have become available. The number of reference genomes for bacteria that cause infectious disease is similarly expanding rapidly. In this webinar Meredith Ashby discusses how these new resources are already yielding new biological insights into critical questions in infectious disease research, including how parasites evade the immune system add how pathogens are adapting to evolutionary pressures.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: The Bat1K project: bat genome, biology and implications

In this presentation, Sonja Vernes of the Max Plank Institute shares her work with the Bat1K project which aims to catalog the genetic diversity of all living bat species. She highlights the unique biology of bats, from their widely varying sizes to their capacity for healthy aging and disease resistance and provides recent findings from ongoing efforts to sequence and annotate the genomes of 21 phylogenetic families of bats.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

User Group Meeting: Improved assembly of segmental duplications using HiFi

In this PacBio User Group Meeting presentation, Mitchell Vollger of the University of Washington used HiFi reads from SMRT Sequencing to study segmental duplications in the human genome. The technique significantly reduced the complexity of accurately mapping these nearly identical sequences throughout the genome; it also reduced the amount of compute power needed compared to a previous PacBio assembly using continuous long reads instead of circular consensus sequencing. Despite generating less data with the HiFi assembly, the team still resolved 30% more segmental duplications with the new approach.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Endless forms: Genomes from the Darwin Tree of Life Project

Mark Blaxter, project lead of the Sanger Institute’s Darwin Tree of Life, shared an update of the ambitious effort to sequence all 60,000 species believed to be on the British Isles over the next 12 years in this presentation at the PAG 2020 Conference. The Sanger team has already generated data for 94 species, including 44 new moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera) PacBio assemblies, which Blaxter describes in this presentation.

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