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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Satellite DNA evolution: old ideas, new approaches.

A substantial portion of the genomes of most multicellular eukaryotes consists of large arrays of tandemly repeated sequence, collectively called satellite DNA. The processes generating and maintaining different satellite DNA abundances across lineages are important to understand as satellites have been linked to chromosome mis-segregation, disease phenotypes, and reproductive isolation between species. While much theory has been developed to describe satellite evolution, empirical tests of these models have fallen short because of the challenges in assessing satellite repeat regions of the genome. Advances in computational tools and sequencing technologies now enable identification and quantification of satellite sequences genome-wide. Here, we…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

sppIDer: a species identification tool to investigate hybrid genomes with high-throughput sequencing.

The genomics era has expanded our knowledge about the diversity of the living world, yet harnessing high-throughput sequencing data to investigate alternative evolutionary trajectories, such as hybridization, is still challenging. Here we present sppIDer, a pipeline for the characterization of interspecies hybrids and pure species, that illuminates the complete composition of genomes. sppIDer maps short-read sequencing data to a combination genome built from reference genomes of several species of interest and assesses the genomic contribution and relative ploidy of each parental species, producing a series of colorful graphical outputs ready for publication. As a proof-of-concept, we use the genus Saccharomyces…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome resequencing and analysis of d-lactic acid fermentation ability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293

Genome resequencing of D-lactic acid-producing Leuconostoc mesenteroides ATCC 8293 revealed 28 base errors in the version published in the 2017. Based on the revised genome annotation, four genes encoding putative D- lactate dehydrogenases were identified. The transcriptional expression of each gene was analyzed at different growth phases and the functionality of each gene was studied in Escherichia coli. Bioreactor studies indicated that L. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 produced D-lactic acid and ethanol at a ratio of 1.7:1 (g/g) regardless of the glucose concentration.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Traditional Norwegian kveik are a genetically distinct group of domesticated Saccharomyces cerevisiae brewing yeasts.

The widespread production of fermented food and beverages has resulted in the domestication of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts specifically adapted to beer production. While there is evidence beer yeast domestication was accelerated by industrialization of beer, there also exists a farmhouse brewing culture in western Norway which has passed down yeasts referred to as kveik for generations. This practice has resulted in ale yeasts which are typically highly flocculant, phenolic off flavor negative (POF-), and exhibit a high rate of fermentation, similar to previously characterized lineages of domesticated yeast. Additionally, kveik yeasts are reportedly high-temperature tolerant, likely due to the traditional…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

DNA sequences and predicted protein structures of prot6E and sefA genes for Salmonella ser. Enteritidis detection

Genes prot6E and sefA are used as targets for detection of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella ser. Enteritidis). We investigated variations in these genes across 64 different Salmonella ser. Enteritidis strains isolated from egg and chicken samples, then used Whole Genome Sequence (WGS) data to model the structures of their protein products. Isolates were sequenced using Illumina technologies. Based on the resulting phylogenetic tree, our isolates clustered in 2 distinct clades. All isolates carried prot6E and sefA. Comparative genomic analyses indicated two non-synonymous mutations (Glycine ? Serine and Valine ? Isoleucine) of prot6E in 11 isolates (9 egg…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

De novo genome assembly of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae) developed through a combination of linked-reads and long-read technologies

Long-read sequencing has greatly contributed to the generation of high quality assemblies, albeit at a high cost. It is also not always clear how to combine sequencing platforms. We sequenced the genome of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), the most important pest in the olive fruits agribusiness industry, using Illumina short-reads, mate-pairs, 10x Genomics linked-reads, Pacific Biosciences (PacBio), and Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT). The 10x linked-reads assembly gave the most contiguous assembly with an N50 of 2.16 Mb. Scaffolding the linked-reads assembly using long-reads from ONT gave a more contiguous assembly with scaffold N50 of 4.59 Mb. We also…

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