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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Staphylococcus aureus CC395 harbours a novel composite staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element.

CoNS species are likely reservoirs of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCC mec ) in Staphylococcus aureus . S . aureus CC395 is unique as it is capable of exchanging DNA with CoNS via bacteriophages, which are also known to mediate transfer of SCC mec .To analyse the structure and putative origin of the SCC mec element in S . aureus CC395.The only MRSA CC395 strain described in the literature, JS395, was subjected to WGS, and its SCC mec element was compared with those found in CoNS species and other S. aureus strains.JS395 was found to carry an unusually large…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Characterization of a PVL-negative community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain of sequence type 88 in China.

Sequence type 88 community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain SR434, isolated from an outpatient with skin and soft tissue infection, was subjected to whole genome sequencing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, mouse skin infection model and hemolysis analysis to identify its virulence and resistance determinants. MRSA strain SR434 is resistant to clindamycin, erythromycin and fosfomycin. Four plasmids with resistance genes were identified in this strain, including a 20,658bp blaZ-carrying plasmid, a 2473bp ermC-carrying plasmid, a 2622bp fosB7-carrying plasmid (86% identity with plasmid in a ST2590 MRSA strain) and a 4817bp lnuA-carrying plasmid (99% identity with pLNU4 from bovine coagulase-nagetive Staphylococci). This strain…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sequence type 5 isolate from the United States.

Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) may be the largest MRSA reservoir outside the hospital setting. One concern with LA-MRSA is the acquisition of novel mobile genetic elements by these isolates. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a swine LA-MRSA sequence type 5 isolate from the United States.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sequence type 398 isolated from swine in the United States.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonizes and causes disease in many animal species. Livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) isolates are represented by isolates of the sequence type 398 (ST398). These isolates are considered to be livestock adapted. This report provides the complete genome sequence of one swine-associated LA-MRSA ST398 isolate from the United States.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence and annotation of the Staphylococcus aureus strain HG001.

Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic Gram-positive pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections from minor skin abscesses to life-threatening diseases. Here, we report the draft genome assembly and current annotation of the HG001 strain, a derivative of the RN1 (NCT8325) strain with restored rbsU (a positive activator of SigB). Copyright © 2017 Caldelari et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of super biofilm-elaborating Staphylococcus aureus isolated in Japan.

Staphylococcus aureus JP080, previously named TF2758, is a clinical isolate from an atheroma and a super biofilm-elaborating strain whose biofilm elaboration is dependent solely on polysaccharide poly-N-acetylglucosamine/polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PNAG/PIA). Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain JP080, which consists of one chromosome and one circular plasmid. Copyright © 2017 Yu et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic comparison between Staphylococcus aureus GN strains clinically isolated from a familial infection case: IS1272 transposition through a novel inverted repeat-replacing mechanism.

A bacterial insertion sequence (IS) is a mobile DNA sequence carrying only the transposase gene (tnp) that acts as a mutator to disrupt genes, alter gene expressions, and cause genomic rearrangements. “Canonical” ISs have historically been characterized by their terminal inverted repeats (IRs), which may form a stem-loop structure, and duplications of a short (non-IR) target sequence at both ends, called target site duplications (TSDs). The IS distributions and virulence potentials of Staphylococcus aureus genomes in familial infection cases are unclear. Here, we determined the complete circular genome sequences of familial strains from a Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive ST50/agr4 S. aureus…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Rapid emergence and evolution of Staphylococcus aureus clones harbouring fusC-containing Staphylococcal cassette chromosome elements.

The prevalence of fusidic acid (FA) resistance amongst Staphylococcus aureus in New Zealand (NZ) is amongst the highest reported globally, with a recent study describing a resistance rate of approximately 28%. Three FA-resistant S. aureus clones (ST5 MRSA, ST1 MSSA and ST1 MRSA) have emerged over the past decade and now predominate in NZ, and in all three clones FA resistance is mediated by the fusC gene. In particular, ST5 MRSA has rapidly become the dominant MRSA clone in NZ, although the origin of FA-resistant ST5 MRSA has not been explored, and the genetic context of fusC in FA-resistant NZ…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First report of cfr-encoding plasmids in the pandemic sequence type (ST) 22 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type-IV clone.

Linezolid is often the drug of last resort for serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Linezolid resistance is mediated by mutations in 23S rRNA and genes for ribosomal proteins, cfr encoding phenicol, lincosamide, oxazolidinone, pleuromutilin and streptogramin A (PhLOPSA) resistance, its homolgue cfr(B) or optrA conferring oxazolidinone and phenicol resistance. Linezolid resistance is rare in S. aureus, and cfr even rarer. This study investigated the clonality and linezolid resistance mechanisms of two MRSA isolates from patients in separate Irish hospitals. Isolates were subjected to cfr PCR, PhLOPSA susceptibility testing, 23S rRNA PCR and sequencing, DNA microarray profiling, spa typing, pulsed-field…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus faecalis LD33, a bacteriocin-producing strain.

Enterococcus faecalis LD33 strain was originally isolated from traditional naturally fermented cream in Inner Mongolia of China. Its complete genome sequence was carried out using the Illumina Hiseq and the PacBio RSII platform. The genome only has a circular chromosome and a GC content of 37.58%. Other core information shown in the genome sequencing results further insight on this bacterium’s genetic elements for bacteriocin production and the genes related to respiratory chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

PEPR: pipelines for evaluating prokaryotic references.

The rapid adoption of microbial whole genome sequencing in public health, clinical testing, and forensic laboratories requires the use of validated measurement processes. Well-characterized, homogeneous, and stable microbial genomic reference materials can be used to evaluate measurement processes, improving confidence in microbial whole genome sequencing results. We have developed a reproducible and transparent bioinformatics tool, PEPR, Pipelines for Evaluating Prokaryotic References, for characterizing the reference genome of prokaryotic genomic materials. PEPR evaluates the quality, purity, and homogeneity of the reference material genome, and purity of the genomic material. The quality of the genome is evaluated using high coverage paired-end sequence…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of two methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates representing a population subset highly prevalent in human colonization.

Here, we report the high-quality draft genome sequences of two methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates, 08-02119 and 08-02300. Belonging to sequence type 582 (ST582) and ST7, both isolates are representatives of clonal lineages often associated with asymptomatic colonization of humans. Copyright © 2016 Weber et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete circular genome sequence of successful ST8/SCCmecIV community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (OC8) in Russia: one-megabase genomic inversion, IS256’s spread, and evolution of Russia ST8-IV.

ST8/SCCmecIV community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has been a common threat, with large USA300 epidemics in the United States. The global geographical structure of ST8/SCCmecIV has not yet been fully elucidated. We herein determined the complete circular genome sequence of ST8/SCCmecIVc strain OC8 from Siberian Russia. We found that 36.0% of the genome was inverted relative to USA300. Two IS256, oppositely oriented, at IS256-enriched hot spots were implicated with the one-megabase genomic inversion (MbIN) and vSaß split. The behavior of IS256 was flexible: its insertion site (att) sequences on the genome and junction sequences of extrachromosomal circular DNA were all…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of lytic bacteriophage SA7 infecting Staphylococcus aureus isolates

Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive and a round-shaped bacterium of Firmicutes phylum, and is a common cause of skin infections, respiratory infections, and food poisoning. Bacteriophages infecting S. aureus can be an effective treatment for S. aureus infections. Here, the draft genomic sequence is announced for a lytic bacteriophage SA7 infecting S. aureus isolates. The bacteriophage SA7 was isolated from a sewage water sample near a livestock farm in Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea. SA7 has a genome of 34,730 bp and 34.1% G + C content. The genome has 53 protein-coding genes, 23 of which have predicted functions from BLASTp analysis,…

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