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Friday, March 13, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: Resolving the complexity of genomic and epigenomic variations in arabidopsis

Chongyuan Luo from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies describes sequencing three strains of Arabidopsis thaliana using PacBio technology. The goal: uncover structural variants that have been missed by short-read and other sequencers. Luo notes that PacBio sequencing provides highly accurate SNP detection and also extends the mappability of reads beyond what is possible with short-read data, producing better and more accurate assemblies.

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Friday, March 13, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: Using PacBio reads and pbjelly software to improve genomes – a cost-effective approach to finishing

Kim Worley from Baylor’s Human Genome Sequencing Center describes the improvement of the sooty mangabey primate genome. Sooty mangabey is a model organism for HIV research, since this particular primate can be infected with the immunodeficiency virus and never develop any symptoms. Worley and her team used PacBio long reads in conjunction with their own assembly tool, PBJelly, closing 64% and improving another 19% of the gaps.

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Friday, March 13, 2020

Movie: The new biology part IV – food & conclusion

Part IV of The New Biology documentary. This documentary film features the wave of cutting-edge technologies that now provide the opportunity to create predictive models of living systems, and gain wisdom about the fundamental nature of life itself. The potential impact for humanity is immense: from fighting complex diseases such as cancer, enabling proactive surveillance of virulent pathogens, and increasing food crop production.

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Friday, March 13, 2020

Movie: The new biology

This documentary film features the wave of cutting-edge technologies that now provide the opportunity to create predictive models of living systems, and gain wisdom about the fundamental nature of life itself. The potential impact for humanity is immense: from fighting complex diseases such as cancer, enabling proactive surveillance of virulent pathogens, and increasing food crop production.

Read More »

Friday, March 13, 2020

AGBT Virtual Poster: Observing heterozygotic DNA methylation patterns in diploid genomes using kinetics data from the PacBio RS

Yuta Suzuki from the University of Tokyo presents his AGBT poster on heterozygotic DNA methylation patterns. He used kinetic data from SMRT Sequencing to generate epigenetic information on samples ranging from human to medaka fish and was able to analyze haplotype-specific methylation data. He also shows that long reads are better able to capture data about CpG islands than short-read sequences.

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Friday, March 13, 2020

Seminar: No assembly required – extremely long reads for full-length transcript isoform sequencing

PacBio CSO Jonas Korlach describes the Iso-Seq method for full-length transcript isoform characterization using SMRT Sequencing. He presents published research using the method for full isoform characterization, including papers from Stanford scientists who analyzed full transcriptomes with SMRT Sequencing. With the Iso-Seq method, researchers found novel isoforms and novel genes even in well-studied cell lines.

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Friday, March 13, 2020

AGBT Conference: Long-read sequence of the gorilla genome

Christopher Hill presents data from efforts to produce reference-grade assemblies for the great ape species. Using SMRT Sequencing, Hill and his colleagues are generating assemblies with much higher contiguity to resolve repetitive and other particularly complex regions. In this talk, he focuses on data from their new high-quality gorilla assembly.

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Friday, March 13, 2020

Podcast: Frontiers of sequencing – Putting long reads and graph assemblies to work

The Mike Schatz lab at Cold Spring Harbor is well know for de novo genome assemblies and their work on structural variation in cancer genomes. In this Mendelspod podcast, lab leader, Mike Schatz, and doctorate student, Maria Nattestad tell of two new projects that include the de novo assembly of a very difficult but important flatworm genome and, secondly, making better variant calls for oncogenes such as HER2.

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Friday, March 13, 2020

ASHG Conference: String graph assembly for diploid genomes with long reads

Jason Chin, senior director of bioinformatics at PacBio, talks about using long-read sequence data and string graph assembly for assembling diploid genomes. A major challenge for diploid genome assembly is in distinguishing homologous regions from repeats, so he discusses how long reads are essential for resolving repeat regions. In the presentation, Chin displays data from two inbred Arabidopsis strains used to create a synthetic diploid assembly.

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Friday, March 13, 2020

AGBT Virtual Poster: Unzipping diploid genomes – revealing all kinds of heterozygous variants from comprehensive haplotig assemblies

In this AGBT virtual poster video, Jason Chin, a bioinformatician at PacBio, describes a polyploidy-aware de novo assembly approach called FALCON and a new algorithm, dubbed FALCON-unzip, that involves “unzipping” diploid genomes for de novo haplotype reconstructions from SMRT Sequencing data. These methods are illustrated in a studies of fungal, Arabidopsis and human datasets for the resolution of structural variation and characterization of haplotypes.

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Friday, March 13, 2020

AGBT Virtual Poster: Long-read assembly of the Aedes aegypti Aag2 cell line genome resolves ancient endogenous viral elements

In this AGBT poster, PacBio bioinformatician Matthew Seetin presents a new assembly for Aedes aegypti cell line, the mosquito responsible for spreading viruses like Dengue and Zika. SMRT Sequencing generated a gapless assembly with a contig N50 of 1.4 Mb, compared to 82 kb in the previous assembly. The genome features a number of transposable elements and long tandem repeats.

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