X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: Using PacBio reads and pbjelly software to improve genomes – a cost-effective approach to finishing

Kim Worley from Baylor’s Human Genome Sequencing Center describes the improvement of the sooty mangabey primate genome. Sooty mangabey is a model organism for HIV research, since this particular primate can be infected with the immunodeficiency virus and never develop any symptoms. Worley and her team used PacBio long reads in conjunction with their own assembly tool, PBJelly, closing 64% and improving another 19% of the gaps.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: Sequencing the Potentilla micrantha genome to study the evolution of fruiting in strawberry

Judson Ward, principal scientists at Driscoll’s Strawberries in California, introduces a genome assembly for Potentilla micrantha, which is closely related to strawberry but lacks fleshy ‘fruits’ or berries. Comparative genomics between P. micrantha and strawberry will yield significant information regarding the genetic mechanisms controlling fruit development. Using SMRT Sequencing Driscoll’s sequenced the 240 Mb P. micaranthagenome and produced a draft genome assembly, spanning the majority of the predicted sequence length. A comparison of sequence data produced using the Illumina HiSeq2000 and the PacBio RS platform demonstrated that PacBio sequencing produced a significantly longer N50 contig size and permitted a more complete genome…

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: A fungal transcriptome uses complex and double-edged isoforms to split wood

From USDA’s Agricultural Research Service, molecular biologist Sean Gordon discusses the need for long-read sequencing to map an organism’s transcriptome. His team analyzed the wood-decaying fungus Plicaturopsis crispa first with short reads and found that they were missing exons and other important information. They switched to SMRT Sequencing so they could observe, rather than infer, full-length transcripts.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: Resolving the complexity of genomic and epigenomic variations in arabidopsis

Chongyuan Luo from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies describes sequencing three strains of Arabidopsis thaliana using PacBio technology. The goal: uncover structural variants that have been missed by short-read and other sequencers. Luo notes that PacBio sequencing provides highly accurate SNP detection and also extends the mappability of reads beyond what is possible with short-read data, producing better and more accurate assemblies.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: Genome assembly strategies of the recent polyploid, Coffea arabica

Susan Strickler of the Boyce Thompson Institute presented strategies for assembling the genome of Arabica coffee, an allotetraploid with a genome size of approximately 1.3 Gb. A de novo PacBio assembly was constructed and presented. The new high-quality reference will be used to guide assemblies of the diploid ancestors of Arabica coffee and re-sequencing data for a set of C. arabica accessions to more fully characterize the genetic diversity of this crop species that is highly susceptible to climate change.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: De novo assembly of a complex panicoid grass genome using ultra-long PacBio reads with P6-C4 chemistry

Robert VanBuren of the Danforth Plant Science Center and winner of the 2014 SMRT Grant Program presents a de novo assembly of the Oro grass genome (Oropetium thomaeum). The reference genome will aid scientist studying drought tolerance in common crop species, especially cereals, though comparative genomics to understand potential key genetic underpinnings for this “resurrection” trait. Initial comparative results to Brachypodium and maize are presented, as well as secondary analysis to identify key metabolic traits.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: A-maize-ing time for plant science – SMRT Sequencing of the maize genome and transcriptome

Doreen Ware introduces her team’s new assembly of maize, built with PacBio long-read sequencing and genome maps from BioNano Genomics. With a contig N50 of nearly 10 Mb and more complete information than any previous assembly, Ware says, “This is just an amazing time to be a plant scientist.” Her presentation includes a number of highlights from the new assembly, which may help crop improvement efforts for maize.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Diploid genome assembly and comprehensive haplotype sequence reconstruction

Jason Chin, senior director of bioinformatics at PacBio, talks about using long-read sequence data to generate diploid genome assemblies to produce comprehensive haplotype sequence reconstructions. In the presentation, Chin describes the FALCON Unzip process that combines SNP phasing with the assembly process and allows for determination of the haplotype sequences and identification of structural variants. He presents an example of diploid assembly from inbred Arabidopsis strains.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Sequencing and assembly of the rice variety N22 (aus group) – A new reference genome to study comparative, evolutionary and functional genomics of rice

David Kudrna, Rod Wing, and the Arizona Genomics Institute (AGI) plan to fully sequence and annotate the genomes and transcriptomes of 3-4 accessions from each of the estimated 9-15 subpopulation of rice. These subpopulation-specific references will be used to map resequencing data of 3,000 individuals for variation discovery, GWAS, and genomic selection studies to address important traits such as biotic and abiotic stress tolerances, yield, and grain quality. Here Dr. Kudrna presents the first high-quality genome sequence of the rice variety Nagina22. AGI produced and assembled 65-fold coverage of SMRT Sequencing data, resulting in an assembly of 373 Mb with…

Read More »

1 2 3 7

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives