fbpx
X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Sunday, July 7, 2019

Origins of the current seventh cholera pandemic.

Vibrio cholerae has caused seven cholera pandemics since 1817, imposing terror on much of the world, but bacterial strains are currently only available for the sixth and seventh pandemics. The El Tor biotype seventh pandemic began in 1961 in Indonesia, but did not originate directly from the classical biotype sixth-pandemic strain. Previous studies focused mainly on the spread of the seventh pandemic after 1970. Here, we analyze in unprecedented detail the origin, evolution, and transition to pandemicity of the seventh-pandemic strain. We used high-resolution comparative genomic analysis of strains collected from 1930 to 1964, covering the evolution from the first…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Phylogeny of dermatophytes with genomic character evaluation of clinically distinct Trichophyton rubrum and T. áviolaceum

Trichophyton rubrum and T. violaceum are prevalent agents of human dermatophyte infections, the former being found on glabrous skin and nail, while the latter is confined to the scalp. The two species are phenotypically different but are highly similar phylogenetically. The taxonomy of dermatophytes is currently being reconsidered on the basis of molecular phylogeny. Molecular species definitions do not always coincide with existing concepts which are guided by ecological and clinical principles. In this article, we aim to bring phylogenetic and ecological data together in an attempt to develop new species concepts for anthropophilic dermatophytes. Focus is on the T.…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence resources for the wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) and the barley stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei)

Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici causes devastating stripe (yellow) rust on wheat and P. striiformis f. sp. hordei causes stripe rust on barley. Several P. striiformis f. sp. tritici genomes are available, but no P. striiformis f. sp. hordei genome is available. More genomes of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici and P. striiformis f. sp. hordei are needed to understand the genome evolution and molecular mechanisms of their pathogenicity. We sequenced P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolate 93-210 and P. striiformis f. sp. hordei isolate 93TX-2, using PacBio and Illumina technologies and RNA sequencing. Their genomic sequences were assembled to…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete and assembled genome sequence of an NDM-5- and CTX-M-15-producing Escherichia coli sequence type 617 isolated from wastewater in Switzerland.

Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli have emerged worldwide and represent a major challenge to effective healthcare management. Here we report the genome sequence of an NDM-5- and CTX-M-15-producing E. coli belonging to sequence type 617 isolated from wastewater treatment plant effluent in Switzerland.Whole-genome sequencing of E. coli 657SK2 was performed using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology RS2 reads (C4/P6 chemistry). De novo assembly was carried out using Canu 1.6, and sequences were annotated using the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP).The genome of E. coli 657SK2 consists of a 4.9-Mbp chromosome containing blaCTX-M-15, genes associated with virulence [fyuA, hlyE, the…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Halomonas hydrothermalis Y2, an efficient ectoine-producer isolated from pulp mill wastewater.

Halophilic microorganisms have great potentials towards biotechnological applications. Halomonas hydrothermalis Y2 is a halotolerant and alkaliphilic strain that isolated from the Na+-rich pulp mill wastewater. The strain is dominant in the bacterial community of pulp mill wastewater and exhibits metabolic diversity in utilizing various substrates. Here we present the genome sequence of this strain, which comprises a circular chromosome 3,933,432 bp in size and a GC content of 60.2%. Diverse genes that encoding proteins for compatible solutes synthesis and transport were identified from the genome. With a complete pathway for ectoine synthesis, the strain could produce ectoine from monosodium glutamate…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome analysis of Vallitalea guaymasensis strain L81 isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent system.

Abyssivirga alkaniphila strain L81T, recently isolated from a black smoker biofilm at the Loki’s Castle hydrothermal vent field, was previously described as a mesophilic, obligately anaerobic heterotroph able to ferment carbohydrates, peptides, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The strain was classified as a new genus within the family Lachnospiraceae. Herein, its genome is analyzed and A. alkaniphila is reassigned to the genus Vallitalea as a new strain of V. guaymasensis, designated V. guaymasensis strain L81. The 6.4 Mbp genome contained 5651 protein encoding genes, whereof 4043 were given a functional prediction. Pathways for fermentation of mono-saccharides, di-saccharides, peptides, and amino acids were…

Read More »

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of WM99c, an antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii global clone 2 (GC2) strain representing an Australian GC2 lineage.

The extensively antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolate WM99c recovered in Sydney, Australia, in 1999 is an early representative of a distinct lineage of global clone 2 (GC2) seen on the east coast of Australia. We present the complete 4.121-Mbp genome sequence (chromosome plus 2 plasmids), generated via long-read sequencing (PacBio).

Read More »

1 27 28 29

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives