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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Direct sequencing of small genomes on the Pacific Biosciences RS without library preparation.

We have developed a sequencing method on the Pacific Biosciences RS sequencer (the PacBio) for small DNA molecules that avoids the need for a standard library preparation. To date this approach has been applied toward sequencing single-stranded and double-stranded viral genomes, bacterial plasmids, plasmid vector models for DNA-modification analysis, and linear DNA fragments covering an entire bacterial genome. Using direct sequencing it is possible to generate sequence data from as little as 1 ng of DNA, offering a significant advantage over current protocols which typically require 400-500 ng of sheared DNA for the library preparation.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Identification of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 DNA methyltransferase, its targets, and physiological roles.

DNA methylation is widespread among prokaryotes, and most DNA methylation reactions are catalyzed by adenine DNA methyltransferases, which are part of restriction-modification (R-M) systems. R-M systems are known for their role in the defense against foreign DNA; however, DNA methyltransferases also play functional roles in gene regulation. In this study, we used single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing to uncover the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. We identified a conserved sequence motif targeted by an adenine methyltransferase of a type I R-M system and quantified the presence of N(6)-methyladenine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Changes…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Celeribacter marinus IMCC12053(T), the host strain of marine bacteriophage P12053L.

Isolated from coastal seawater from Yellow Sea of Korea, Celeribacter marinus IMCC12053 was used as the host bacterium for bacteriophage P12053L. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain IMCC12053 for further study of the marine bacteriophage P12053L functional genes. Single molecule real-time technology (PacBio RSII) was used for the single circular chromosome that is 3,096,705 base pairs in length and the GC content is 56.24%. It contains 3155 ORFs with 45 tRNAs and 6 rRNAs genes. N(6)-methyladenosine patterns were also investigated for 32 unmethylated genes and intergenic regions that covered many regulators and phage genes as well as…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete sequences of multidrug resistance plasmids bearing rmtD1 and rmtD2 16S ribosomal RNA methyltransferase genes.

Complete nucleotide sequences were determined for two plasmids bearing rmtD group 16S rRNA methyltransferase genes. pKp64/11 was 78 kb in size, belonged to the IncL/M group, and harbored blaTEM-1b, sul1, qacE?1, dfrA22, and rmtD1 across two multidrug resistance regions (MRRs). pKp368/10 was 170 kb in size, belonged to the IncA/C group, and harbored acrB, sul1, qacE?1, ant(3?)-Ia, aac(6′)-Ib, cat, rmtD2, and blaCTX-M-8 across three MRRs. The rmtD-containing regions shared a conserved motif, suggesting a common origin for the two rmtD alleles. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the potato pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum UY031.

Ralstonia solanacearum is the causative agent of bacterial wilt of potato. Ralstonia solanacearum strain UY031 belongs to the American phylotype IIB, sequevar 1, also classified as race 3 biovar 2. Here we report the completely sequenced genome of this strain, the first complete genome for phylotype IIB, sequevar 1, and the fourth for the R. solanacearum species complex. In addition to standard genome annotation, we have carried out a curated annotation of type III effector genes, an important pathogenicity-related class of genes for this organism. We identified 60 effector genes, and observed that this effector repertoire is distinct when compared…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence and genomic characterization of Microcystis panniformis FACHB 1757 by third-generation sequencing.

The cyanobacterial genus Microcystis is well known as the main group that forms harmful blooms in water. A strain of Microcystis, M. panniformis FACHB1757, was isolated from Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu in August 2011. The whole genome was sequenced using PacBio RS II sequencer with 48-fold coverage. The complete genome sequence with no gaps contained a 5,686,839 bp chromosome and a 38,683 bp plasmid, which coded for 6,519 and 49 proteins, respectively. Comparison with strains of M. aeruginosa and some other water bloom-forming cyanobacterial species revealed large-scale structure rearrangement and length variation at the genome level along with 36…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome and methylome sequences of two Salmonella enterica spp.

Salmonella enterica is responsible for major foodborne outbreaks worldwide. It can cause gastroenteritis characterized by diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Salmonella infections raise public health concerns along with consequential economic impacts. In this report, we announce the first complete genome sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraeuis (S. Choleraeuis) ATCC 10708 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Pullorum (S. Pullorum) ATCC 9120, isolated from patients with diarrhea. Copyright © 2016 Yao et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Adaptive engineering of a hyperthermophilic archaeon on CO and discovering the underlying mechanism by multi-omics analysis.

The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 can grow and produce H2 on carbon monoxide (CO) and its H2 production rates have been improved through metabolic engineering. In this study, we applied adaptive evolution to enhance H2 productivity. After over 150 serial transfers onto CO medium, cell density, CO consumption rate and H2 production rate increased. The underlying mechanism for those physiological changes could be explained by using multi-omics approaches including genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses. A putative transcriptional regulator was newly identified to regulate the expression levels of genes related to CO oxidation. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Structural insights into DNA sequence recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

Engineering restriction enzymes with new sequence specificity has been an unaccomplished challenge, presumably because of the complexity of target recognition. Here we report detailed analyses of target recognition by Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes. We determined the structure of the Type ISP enzyme LlaGI bound to its target and compared it with the previously reported structure of a close homologue that binds to a distinct target, LlaBIII. The comparison revealed that, although the two enzymes use almost a similar set of structural elements for target recognition, the residues that read the bases vary. Change in specificity resulted not only from appropriate…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence and methylome analysis of Aeromonas hydrophila strain YL17, isolated from a compost pile.

In this report, we announce the complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila strain YL17. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) DNA sequencing was used to generate the complete genome sequence and the genome-wide DNA methylation profile of this environmental isolate. A total of five unique DNA methyltransferase recognition motifs were reported here. Copyright © 2016 Lim et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Finished genome sequence and methylome of the cyanide-degrading Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes strain CECT5344 as resolved by single-molecule real-time sequencing.

Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 tolerates cyanide and is also able to utilize cyanide and cyano-derivatives as a nitrogen source under alkaline conditions. The strain is considered as candidate for bioremediation of habitats contaminated with cyanide-containing liquid wastes. Information on the genome sequence of the strain CECT5344 became available previously. The P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 genome was now resequenced by applying the single molecule, real-time (SMRT(®)) sequencing technique developed by Pacific Biosciences. The complete and finished genome sequence of the strain consists of a 4,696,984 bp chromosome featuring a GC-content of 62.34%. Comparative analyses between the new and previous versions of the P.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete nucleotide sequence of pH11, an IncHI2 plasmid conferring multi-antibiotic resistance and multi-heavy metal resistance genes in a clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate.

The complete 284,628bp sequence of pH11, an IncHI2 plasmid, was determined through single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing. Harbored by a clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae strain H11, and isolated in Beijing, this plasmid contains multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including catA2, aac(6′)-Ib, strB, strA, dfrA19, blaTEM-1, blaSHV-12, sul1, qacE delta 1, ereA, arr2, and aac3. The aac(6′)-Ib is carried by a class I integron. Plasmid pH11 also carries several genes associated with resistance to heavy metals, such as tellurium, mercury, cobalt, zinc, nickel, copper, lead and cadmium. This plasmid exhibits numerous characteristics, including HipBA and RelBE toxin-antitoxin systems, two major transfer (Tra) regions closely…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Regulation of genetic flux between bacteria by restriction-modification systems.

Restriction-modification (R-M) systems are often regarded as bacteria’s innate immune systems, protecting cells from infection by mobile genetic elements (MGEs). Their diversification has been recently associated with the emergence of particularly virulent lineages. However, we have previously found more R-M systems in genomes carrying more MGEs. Furthermore, it has been suggested that R-M systems might favor genetic transfer by producing recombinogenic double-stranded DNA ends. To test whether R-M systems favor or disfavor genetic exchanges, we analyzed their frequency with respect to the inferred events of homologous recombination and horizontal gene transfer within 79 bacterial species. Genetic exchanges were more frequent…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Structure of Type IIL restriction-modification enzyme MmeI in complex with DNA has implications for engineering new specificities.

The creation of restriction enzymes with programmable DNA-binding and -cleavage specificities has long been a goal of modern biology. The recently discovered Type IIL MmeI family of restriction-and-modification (RM) enzymes that possess a shared target recognition domain provides a framework for engineering such new specificities. However, a lack of structural information on Type IIL enzymes has limited the repertoire that can be rationally engineered. We report here a crystal structure of MmeI in complex with its DNA substrate and an S-adenosylmethionine analog (Sinefungin). The structure uncovers for the first time the interactions that underlie MmeI-DNA recognition and methylation (5′-TCCRAC-3′; R…

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