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Thursday, August 27, 2020

Product Note: Fast, high-resolution DNA sizing with the fragment analyzer system

The Agilent 5200, 5300, and 5400 Fragment Analyzer instruments are fast, high-resolution benchtop capillary electrophoresis (CE) platforms that utilize proprietary markers to accurately size fragments ranging from 10 to 50 kb. This platform allows important DNA quality checkpoints to be completed in one hour for de novo large-genome sequencing projects and other PacBio applications leveraging multi-kilobase read lengths. The instrument can be used in place of time-consuming QC steps involving pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), saving time by avoiding multiple overnight gel runs when preparing large-insert SMRTbell libraries. Alternative DNA-sizing instruments cannot accurately resolve large DNA fragments in this range.

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Thursday, August 27, 2020

Application Brief: Variant detection using whole genome sequencing with HiFi reads – Best Practices

With highly accurate long reads (HiFi reads) from the Sequel II System, powered by Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing technology, you can comprehensively detect variants in a human genome. HiFi reads provide high precision and recall for single nucleotide variants (SNVs), indels, structural variants (SVs), and copy number variants (CNVs), including in difficult-to-map repetitive regions.

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Thursday, August 27, 2020

Application Brief: Structural variant detection using whole genome sequencing – Best Practices

With the Sequel II System powered by Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing technology and SMRT Link v8.0, you can affordably and effectively detect structural variants (SVs), copy number variants, and large indels ranging in size from tens to thousands of base pairs. PacBio long-read whole genome sequencing comprehensively resolves variants in an individual with high precision and recall. For population genetics and pedigree studies, joint calling powers rapid discovery of common variants within a sample cohort.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Long-read sequencing for rare human genetic diseases.

During the past decade, the search for pathogenic mutations in rare human genetic diseases has involved huge efforts to sequence coding regions, or the entire genome, using massively parallel short-read sequencers. However, the approximate current diagnostic rate is

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Improved assembly and variant detection of a haploid human genome using single-molecule, high-fidelity long reads.

The sequence and assembly of human genomes using long-read sequencing technologies has revolutionized our understanding of structural variation and genome organization. We compared the accuracy, continuity, and gene annotation of genome assemblies generated from either high-fidelity (HiFi) or continuous long-read (CLR) datasets from the same complete hydatidiform mole human genome. We find that the HiFi sequence data assemble an additional 10% of duplicated regions and more accurately represent the structure of tandem repeats, as validated with orthogonal analyses. As a result, an additional 5 Mbp of pericentromeric sequences are recovered in the HiFi assembly, resulting in a 2.5-fold increase in…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

A robust benchmark for germline structural variant detection

New technologies and analysis methods are enabling genomic structural variants (SVs) to be detected with ever-increasing accuracy, resolution, and comprehensiveness. Translating these methods to routine research and clinical practice requires robust benchmark sets. We developed the first benchmark set for identification of both false negative and false positive germline SVs, which complements recent efforts emphasizing increasingly comprehensive characterization of SVs. To create this benchmark for a broadly consented son in a Personal Genome Project trio with broadly available cells and DNA, the Genome in a Bottle (GIAB) Consortium integrated 19 sequence-resolved variant calling methods, both alignment- and de novo assembly-based,…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Telomere-to-telomere assembly of a complete human X chromosome

After nearly two decades of improvements, the current human reference genome (GRCh38) is the most accurate and complete vertebrate genome ever produced. However, no one chromosome has been finished end to end, and hundreds of unresolved gaps persist. The remaining gaps include ribosomal rDNA arrays, large near-identical segmental duplications, and satellite DNA arrays. These regions harbor largely unexplored variation of unknown consequence, and their absence from the current reference genome can lead to experimental artifacts and hide true variants when re-sequencing additional human genomes. Here we present a de novo human genome assembly that surpasses the continuity of GRCh38, along…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Paragraph: A graph-based structural variant genotyper for short-read sequence data

Accurate detection and genotyping of structural variations (SVs) from short-read data is a long-standing area of development in genomics research and clinical sequencing pipelines. We introduce Paragraph, a fast and accurate genotyper that models SVs using sequence graphs and SV annotations produced by a range of methods and technologies. We demonstrate the accuracy of Paragraph on whole genome sequence data from a control sample with both short and long read sequencing data available, and then apply it at scale to a cohort of 100 samples of diverse ancestry sequenced with short-reads. Comparative analyses indicate that Paragraph has better accuracy than…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Characterization of LINE-1 transposons in a human genome at allelic resolution

The activity of the retrotransposon LINE-1 has created a substantial portion of the human genome. Most of this sequence comprises fractured and debilitated LINE-1s. An accurate approximation of the number, location, and sequence of the LINE-1 elements present in any single genome has proven elusive due to the difficulty of assembling and phasing the repetitive and polymorphic regions of the human genome. Through an in-depth analysis of publicly-available, deep, long-read assemblies of nearly homozygous human genomes, we defined the location and sequence of all intact LINE-1s in these assemblies. We found 148 and 142 intact LINE-1s in two nearly homozygous…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Loss-of-function tolerance of enhancers in the human genome

Previous studies have surveyed the potential impact of loss-of-function (LoF) variants and identified LoF-tolerant protein-coding genes. However, the tolerance of human genomes to losing enhancers has not yet been evaluated. Here we present the catalog of LoF-tolerant enhancers using structural variants from whole-genome sequences. Using a conservative approach, we estimate that each individual human genome possesses at least 28 LoF-tolerant enhancers on average. We assessed the properties of LoF-tolerant enhancers in a unified regulatory network constructed by integrating tissue-specific enhancers and gene-gene interactions. We find that LoF-tolerant enhancers are more tissue-specific and regulate fewer and more dispensable genes. They are…

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