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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of the Serratia plymuthica strains 3Rp8 and 3Re4-18, two rhizosphere bacteria with antagonistic activity towards fungal phytopathogens and plant growth promoting abilities.

The Serratia plymuthica strains 3Rp8 and 3Re4-18 are motile, Gram-negative, non-sporulating bacteria. Strain 3Rp8 was isolated from the rhizosphere of Brassica napus L. and strain 3Re4-18 from the endorhiza of Solanum tuberosum L. Studies have shown in vitro activity against the soil-borne fungi Verticillium dahliae Kleb., Rhizoctonia solani Kühn, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Here, we announce and describe the complete genome sequence of S. plymuthica 3Rp8 consisting of a single circular chromosome of 5.5 Mb that encodes 4954 protein-coding and 108 RNA-only encoding genes and of S. plymuthica 3Re4-18 consisting of a single circular chromosome of 5.4 Mb that encodes 4845 protein-coding and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The botrydial biosynthetic gene cluster of Botrytis cinerea displays a bipartite genomic structure and is positively regulated by the putative Zn(II)2Cys6 transcription factor BcBot6.

Botrydial (BOT) is a non-host specific phytotoxin produced by the polyphagous phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. The genomic region of the BOT biosynthetic gene cluster was investigated and revealed two additional genes named Bcbot6 and Bcbot7. Analysis revealed that the G+C/A+T-equilibrated regions that contain the Bcbot genes alternate with A+T-rich regions made of relics of transposable elements that have undergone repeat-induced point mutations (RIP). Furthermore, BcBot6, a Zn(II)2Cys6 putative transcription factor was identified as a nuclear protein and the major positive regulator of BOT biosynthesis. In addition, the phenotype of the ?Bcbot6 mutant indicated that BcBot6 and therefore BOT are dispensable…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequencing and comparative genomics analysis revealed pathogenic potential in Penicillium capsulatum as a novel fungal pathogen belonging to Eurotiales.

Penicillium capsulatum is a rare Penicillium species used in paper manufacturing, but recently it has been reported to cause invasive infection. To research the pathogenicity of the clinical Penicillium strain, we sequenced the genomes and transcriptomes of the clinical and environmental strains of P. capsulatum. Comparative analyses of these two P. capsulatum strains and close related strains belonging to Eurotiales were performed. The assembled genome sizes of P. capsulatum are approximately 34.4 Mbp in length and encode 11,080 predicted genes. The different isolates of P. capsulatum are highly similar, with the exception of several unique genes, INDELs or SNPs in…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A complete toolset for the study of Ustilago bromivora and Brachypodium sp. as a fungal-temperate grass pathosystem.

Due to their economic relevance, the study of plant pathogen interactions is of importance. However, elucidating these interactions and their underlying molecular mechanisms remains challenging since both host and pathogen need to be fully genetically accessible organisms. Here we present milestones in the establishment of a new biotrophic model pathosystem: Ustilago bromivora and Brachypodium sp. We provide a complete toolset, including an annotated fungal genome and methods for genetic manipulation of the fungus and its host plant. This toolset will enable researchers to easily study biotrophic interactions at the molecular level on both the pathogen and the host side. Moreover,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole-genome de novo sequencing, combined with RNA-Seq analysis, reveals unique genome and physiological features of the amylolytic yeast Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and its interspecies hybrid.

Genomic studies on fungal species with hydrolytic activity have gained increased attention due to their great biotechnological potential for biomass-based biofuel production. The amylolytic yeast Saccharomycopsis fibuligera has served as a good source of enzymes and genes involved in saccharification. Despite its long history of use in food fermentation and bioethanol production, very little is known about the basic physiology and genomic features of S. fibuligera.We performed whole-genome (WG) de novo sequencing and complete assembly of S. fibuligera KJJ81 and KPH12, two isolates from wheat-based Nuruk in Korea. Intriguingly, the KJJ81 genome (~38 Mb) was revealed as a hybrid between the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomics of Beauveria bassiana: uncovering signatures of virulence against mosquitoes.

Entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are promising biological agents for control of malaria mosquitoes. Indeed, infection with B. bassiana reduces the lifespan of mosquitoes in the laboratory and in the field. Natural isolates of B. bassiana show up to 10-fold differences in virulence between the most and the least virulent isolate. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of five isolates representing the extremes of low/high virulence and three RNA libraries, and applied a genome comparison approach to uncover genetic mechanisms underpinning virulence.A high-quality, near-complete genome assembly was achieved for the highly virulent isolate Bb8028, which was compared to…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

CoLoRMap: Correcting Long Reads by Mapping short reads.

Second generation sequencing technologies paved the way to an exceptional increase in the number of sequenced genomes, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic. However, short reads are difficult to assemble and often lead to highly fragmented assemblies. The recent developments in long reads sequencing methods offer a promising way to address this issue. However, so far long reads are characterized by a high error rate, and assembling from long reads require a high depth of coverage. This motivates the development of hybrid approaches that leverage the high quality of short reads to correct errors in long reads.We introduce CoLoRMap, a hybrid method…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genomic and transcriptional landscape analysis using third-generation sequencing: a case study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D.

Completion of eukaryal genomes can be difficult task with the highly repetitive sequences along the chromosomes and short read lengths of second-generation sequencing. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CEN.PK113-7D, widely used as a model organism and a cell factory, was selected for this study to demonstrate the superior capability of very long sequence reads for de novo genome assembly. We generated long reads using two common third-generation sequencing technologies (Oxford Nanopore Technology (ONT) and Pacific Biosciences (PacBio)) and used short reads obtained using Illumina sequencing for error correction. Assembly of the reads derived from all three technologies resulted in complete sequences for…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the necrotrophic plant pathogen Alternaria brassicicola Abra43.

Alternaria brassicicola causes dark spot (or black spot) disease, which is one of the most common and destructive fungal diseases of Brassicaceae spp. worldwide. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain Abra43. The assembly comprises 29 scaffolds, with an N50 value of 2.1 Mb. The assembled genome was 31,036,461 bp in length, with a G+C content of 50.85%.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Gapless genome assembly of the potato and tomato early blight pathogen Alternaria solani.

The Alternaria genus consists of saprophytic fungi as well as plant-pathogenic species that have significant economic impact. To date, the genomes of multiple Alternaria species have been sequenced. These studies have yielded valuable data for molecular studies on Alternaria fungi. However, most of the current Alternaria genome assemblies are highly fragmented, thereby hampering the identification of genes that are involved in causing disease. Here, we report a gapless genome assembly of A. solani, the causal agent of early blight in tomato and potato. The genome assembly is a significant step toward a better understanding of pathogenicity of A. solani.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the marine Rhodococcus sp. H-CA8f isolated from Comau fjord in Northern Patagonia, Chile

Rhodococcus sp. H-CA8f was isolated from marine sediments obtained from the Comau fjord, located in Northern Chilean Patagonia. Whole-genome sequencing was achieved using PacBio RS II platform, comprising one closed, complete chromosome of 6,19?Mbp with a 62.45% G?+?C content. The chromosome harbours several metabolic pathways providing a wide catabolic potential, where the upper biphenyl route is described. Also, Rhodococcus sp. H-CA8f bears one linear mega-plasmid of 301?Kbp and 62.34% of G?+?C content, where genomic analyses demonstrated that it is constituted mostly by putative ORFs with unknown functions, representing a novel genetic feature. These genetic characteristics provide relevant insights regarding Chilean…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Host genetic variation strongly influences the microbiome structure and function in fungal fruiting-bodies.

Despite increasing knowledge on host-associated microbiomes, little is known about mechanisms underlying fungus-microbiome interactions. This study aimed to examine the relative importance of host genetic, geographic and environmental variations in structuring fungus-associated microbiomes. We analyzed the taxonomic composition and function of microbiomes inhabiting fungal fruiting-bodies in relation to host genetic variation, soil pH and geographic distance between samples. For this, we sequenced the metagenomes of 40 fruiting-bodies collected from six fairy rings (i.e., genets) of a saprotrophic fungus Marasmius oreades. Our analyses revealed that fine genetic variations between host fungi could strongly affect their associated microbiome, explaining, respectively, 25% and 37%…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of the phytopathogenic fungus Ganoderma boninense, the causal agent of basal stem rot disease on oil palm.

Ganoderma boninense is the dominant fungal pathogen of basal stem rot (BSR) disease on Elaeis guineensis We sequenced the nuclear genome of mycelia using both Illumina and Pacific Biosciences platforms for assembly of scaffolds. The draft genome comprised 79.24?Mb, 495 scaffolds, and 26,226 predicted coding sequences. Copyright © 2018 Utomo et al.

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