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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete genome sequence and characterization of virulence genes in Lancefield group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae isolated from farmed amberjack (Seriola dumerili).

Lancefield group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae causes infections in farmed fish. Here, the genome of S. dysgalactiae strain kdys0611, isolated from farmed amberjack (Seriola dumerili) was sequenced. The complete genome sequence of kdys0611 consists of a single chromosome and five plasmids. The chromosome is 2,142,780?bp long and has a GC content of 40%. It possesses 2061 coding sequences and 67 tRNA and 6 rRNA operons. One clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat, 125 insertion sequences, and four predicted prophage elements were identified. Phylogenetic analysis based on 126 core genes suggested that the kdys0611 strain is more closely related to S. dysgalactiae…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Detection of transferable oxazolidinone resistance determinants in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium of swine origin in Sichuan Province, China.

The aim of this study was to detect the transferable oxazolidinone resistance determinants (cfr, optrA and poxtA) in E. faecalis and E. faecium of swine origin in Sichuan Province, China.A total of 158 enterococci strains (93 E. faecalis and 65 E. faecium) isolated from 25 large-scale swine farms were screened for the presence of cfr, optrA and poxtA by PCR. The genetic environments of cfr, optrA and poxtA were characterized by whole genome sequencing. Transfer of oxazolidinone resistance determinants was determined by conjugation or electrotransformation experiments.The transferable oxazolidinone resistance determinants, cfr, optrA and poxtA, were detected in zero, six, and…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Comparative genomic analysis unravels the transmission pattern and intra-species divergence of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND)-causing Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains.

Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is a recently discovered shrimp disease that has become a severe threat to global shrimp-farming industry. The causing agents of AHPND were identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus and other vibrios harboring a plasmid encoding binary toxins PirAvp/PirBvp. However, the epidemiological involvement of environmental vibrios in AHPND is poorly understood. In this study, with an aim to reveal the possible transmission route of AHPND-causing V. parahaemolyticus, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four pairs of V. parahaemolyticus strains from four representative regions of shrimp farming in China, each including one strain isolated from diseased shrimp during…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Draft Genome Sequences of Flavobacterium columnare Strains ARS1 and BGFS27, Isolated from Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

Flavobacterium columnare strain BGFS27 was isolated from an apparently healthy wild channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) collected from the Mobile River in 2005. F. columnare strain ARS1 was isolated from a channel catfish suffering from columnaris disease in a commercial farm in 1996. BGFS27 belongs to genomovar II (genetic group 2), while ARS1 belongs to genomovar III (genetic group 3). Here, we report the draft genome sequences of F. columnare BGFS27 and ARS1, obtained by PacBio sequencing.Copyright © 2019 Cai and Arias.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete Genome Sequences of Two Melissococcus plutonius Strains with Different Virulence Profiles, Obtained by PacBio Sequencing.

Melissococcus plutonius attacks honeybee larvae, causing European foulbrood. Based on their virulence toward larvae, M. plutonius isolates were classified into three types, highly virulent, moderately virulent, and avirulent. We herein performed whole-genome sequencing of M. plutonius isolates with different virulence levels to promote an understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease.Copyright © 2019 Okumura et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Draft Genome Sequences of Type VI Secretion System-Encoding Vibrio fischeri Strains FQ-A001 and ES401.

The type VI secretion system (T6SS) facilitates lethal competition between bacteria through direct contact. Comparative genomics has facilitated the study of these systems in Vibrio fischeri, which colonizes the squid host Euprymna scolopes Here, we report the draft genome sequences of two lethal V. fischeri strains that encode the T6SS, FQ-A001 and ES401.Copyright © 2019 Bultman et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Genomic Islands in the Full-Genome Sequence of an NAD-Hemin-Independent Avibacterium paragallinarum Strain Isolated from Peru.

Here, we report the full-genome sequence of an NAD-hemin-independent Avibacterium paragallinarum serovar C-2 strain, FARPER-174, isolated from layer hens in Peru. This genome contained 12 potential genomic islands that include ribosomal protein-coding genes, a nadR gene, hemocin-coding genes, sequences of fagos, an rtx operon, and drug resistance genes. Copyright © 2019 Tataje-Lavanda et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Draft Genome Sequences of 38 Serratia marcescens Isolates Associated with Acroporid Serratiosis.

Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative bacterium causally linked to acroporid serratiosis, a form of white pox disease implicated in the decline of elkhorn corals. We report draft genomes of 38 S. marcescens isolates collected from host and nonhost sources. The availability of these genomes will aid future analyses of acroporid serratiosis. Copyright © 2019 Elledge et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete Genome Sequence of Shewanella sp. Strain TH2012, Isolated from Shrimp in a Cultivation Pond Exhibiting Early Mortality Syndrome.

Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a Shewanella isolate, TH2012, from a shrimp pond in which shrimp exhibited early mortality syndrome (EMS)/acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND). The complete genome of TH2012 has a prophage-like element and a number of potential virulence factors, making TH2012 a possible contributing factor to EMS outbreaks. Copyright © 2019 Wechprasit et al.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Genomic Analysis of Emerging Florfenicol-Resistant Campylobacter coli Isolated from the Cecal Contents of Cattle in the United States.

Genomic analyses were performed on florfenicol-resistant (FFNr) Campylobacter coli isolates recovered from cattle, and the cfr(C) gene-associated multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmid was characterized. Sixteen FFNrC. coli isolates recovered between 2013 and 2018 from beef cattle were sequenced using MiSeq. Genomes and plasmids were found to be closed for three of the isolates using the PacBio system. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome and the structures of MDR plasmids were investigated. Conjugation experiments were performed to determine the transferability of cfr(C)-associated MDR plasmids. The spectrum of resistance encoded by the cfr(C) gene was further investigated by agar dilution antimicrobial susceptibility…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete Genome Sequence Analysis and Characterization of Selected Iron Regulation Genes of Pasteurella Multocida Serotype A Strain PMTB2.1.

Although more than 100 genome sequences of Pasteurella multocida are available, comprehensive and complete genome sequence analysis is limited. This study describes the analysis of complete genome sequence and pathogenomics of P. multocida strain PMTB2.1. The genome of PMTB2.1 has 2176 genes with more than 40 coding sequences associated with iron regulation and 140 virulence genes including the complete tad locus. The tad locus includes several previously uncharacterized genes such as flp2, rcpC and tadV genes. A transposable phage resembling to Mu phages was identified in P. multocida that has not been identified in any other serotype yet. The multi-locus…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Shared and unique microbes between Small hive beetles (Aethina tumida) and their honey bee hosts.

The small hive beetle (SHB) is an opportunistic parasite that feeds on bee larvae, honey, and pollen. While SHBs can also feed on fruit and other plant products, like its plant-feeding relatives, SHBs prefer to feed on hive resources and only reproduce inside bee colonies. As parasites, SHBs are inevitably exposed to bee-associated microbes, either directly from the bees or from the hive environment. These microbes have unknown impacts on beetles, nor is it known how extensively beetles transfer microbes among their bee hosts. To identify sets of beetle microbes and the transmission of microbes from bees to beetles, a…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Whole-genome sequence of the bovine blood fluke Schistosoma bovis supports interspecific hybridization with S. haematobium.

Mesenteric infection by the parasitic blood fluke Schistosoma bovis is a common veterinary problem in Africa and the Middle East and occasionally in the Mediterranean Region. The species also has the ability to form interspecific hybrids with the human parasite S. haematobium with natural hybridisation observed in West Africa, presenting possible zoonotic transmission. Additionally, this exchange of alleles between species may dramatically influence disease dynamics and parasite evolution. We have generated a 374 Mb assembly of the S. bovis genome using Illumina and PacBio-based technologies. Despite infecting different hosts and organs, the genome sequences of S. bovis and S. haematobium…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

The bacteriocin from the prophylactic candidate Streptococcus suis 90-1330 is widely distributed across S. suis isolates and appears encoded in an integrative and conjugative element.

The Gram-positive a-hemolytic Streptococcus suis is a major pathogen in the swine industry and an emerging zoonotic agent that can cause several systemic issues in both pigs and humans. A total of 35 S. suis serotypes (SS) have been identified and genotyped into > 700 sequence types (ST) by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Eurasian ST1 isolates are the most virulent of all S. suis SS2 strains while North American ST25 and ST28 strains display moderate to low/no virulence phenotypes, respectively. Notably, S. suis 90-1330 is an avirulent Canadian SS2-ST28 isolate producing a lantibiotic bacteriocin with potential prophylactic applications. To investigate…

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