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Sunday, July 7, 2019

TERRA promotes telomerase-mediated telomere elongation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

Telomerase-mediated telomere elongation provides cell populations with the ability to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase is capable of recognizing and extending the shortest telomeres in cells; nevertheless, how this mechanism is executed remains unclear. Here, we show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, shortened telomeres are highly transcribed into the evolutionarily conserved long noncoding RNA TERRA A fraction of TERRA produced upon telomere shortening is polyadenylated and largely devoid of telomeric repeats, and furthermore, telomerase physically interacts with this polyadenylated TERRA in vivo We also show that experimentally enhanced transcription of a manipulated telomere promotes its association with telomerase and concomitant…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Association between progranulin and Gaucher disease.

Gaucher disease (GD) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene which result in reduced enzymatic activity of ß-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). This study identified the progranulin (PGRN) gene (GRN) as another gene associated with GD.Serum levels of PGRN were measured from 115 GD patients and 99 healthy controls, whole GRN gene from 40 GD patients was sequenced, and the genotyping of 4 SNPs identified in GD patients was performed in 161 GD and 142 healthy control samples. Development of GD in PGRN-deficient mice was characterized, and the therapeutic effect of rPGRN on GD analyzed.Serum PGRN levels were significantly…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of 17 Canadian isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg from human, animal, and food sources.

Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg is a highly clonal serovar frequently associated with foodborne illness. To facilitate subtyping efforts, we report fully assembled genome sequences of 17 Canadian S Heidelberg isolates including six pairs of epidemiologically related strains. The plasmid sequences of eight isolates contain several drug resistance genes. © Crown copyright 2016.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Adaptive radiation by waves of gene transfer leads to fine-scale resource partitioning in marine microbes.

Adaptive radiations are important drivers of niche filling, since they rapidly adapt a single clade of organisms to ecological opportunities. Although thought to be common for animals and plants, adaptive radiations have remained difficult to document for microbes in the wild. Here we describe a recent adaptive radiation leading to fine-scale ecophysiological differentiation in the degradation of an algal glycan in a clade of closely related marine bacteria. Horizontal gene transfer is the primary driver in the diversification of the pathway leading to several ecophysiologically differentiated Vibrionaceae populations adapted to different physical forms of alginate. Pathway architecture is predictive of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A novel plasmid, pSx1, harboring a new Tn1696 derivative from extensively drug-resistant Shewanella xiamenensis encoding OXA-416.

The whole genome sequencing of extensively drug-resistant Shewanella xiamenensis T17 isolated from hospital effluents in Algeria revealed the presence of a novel 268.4?kb plasmid designated pSx1, which carries several antibiotic-resistance genes in the novel Tn1696 derivative (Tn6297), in addition to the chromosomal blaOXA-48-like gene (blaOXA-416). The presence of the plasmid was confirmed by nuclease S1-PFGE analysis and transformation by electroporation into Escherichia coli DH10B. Tn6297 contains an In27 class 1 integron harboring the dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 array, msr(E) and mph(E) associated with IS26; a new efflux pump multidrug resistance composite transposon delimited by two ISEc29s; Tn-tet harboring tetR and tetA(C); a class…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Function and phylogeny of bacterial butyryl coenzyme A: acetate transferases and their diversity in the proximal colon of swine.

Studying the host-associated butyrate-producing bacterial community is important, because butyrate is essential for colonic homeostasis and gut health. Previous research has identified the butyryl coenzyme A (CoA):acetate-CoA transferase (EC 2.3.8.3) as a gene of primary importance for butyrate production in intestinal ecosystems; however, this gene family (but) remains poorly defined. We developed tools for the analysis of butyrate-producing bacteria based on 12 putative but genes identified in the genomes of nine butyrate-producing bacteria obtained from the swine intestinal tract. Functional analyses revealed that eight of these genes had strong But enzyme activity. When but paralogues were found within a genome,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

TeloPCR-seq: a high-throughput sequencing approach for telomeres.

We have developed a high-throughput sequencing approach that enables us to determine terminal telomere sequences from tens of thousands of individual Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomeres. This method provides unprecedented coverage of telomeric sequence complexity in fission yeast. S. pombe telomeres are composed of modular degenerate repeats that can be explained by variation in usage of the TER1 RNA template during reverse transcription. Taking advantage of this deep sequencing approach, we find that ‘like’ repeat modules are highly correlated within individual telomeres. Moreover, repeat module preference varies with telomere length, suggesting that existing repeats promote the incorporation of like repeats and/or that…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Closed complete genome sequences of two nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae strains containing novel modA alleles from the sputum of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important bacterial pathogen that causes otitis media and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Here, we report the complete genome sequences of NTHi strains 10P129H1 and 84P36H1, isolated from COPD patients, which contain the phase-variable epigenetic regulators ModA15 and ModA18, respectively.

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