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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequences of five Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from farmed animals and wildlife in Canada.

Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, an infectious disease that affects both animals and humans and thus presents a risk to public health and the livestock industry. Here, we report the genome sequences of five Mycobacterium bovis strains that represent major genotype clusters observed in farmed animals and wildlife in Canada.© Crown copyright 2018.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft whole-genome sequence of the fluorene-degrading Sphingobium sp. strain LB126, isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

We report here the draft whole-genome sequence of a fluorene-degrading bacterium, Sphingobium sp. strain LB126. The genes involved in the upper biodegradation pathway of fluorene are located on a plasmid, and the lower pathway that generates tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is initiated by the meta-cleavage of protocatechuic acid that is chromosomally encoded. Copyright © 2018 Augelletti et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First complete genome sequence of Yersinia massiliensis.

Using a combination of Illumina paired-end sequencing, Pacific Biosciences RS II sequencing, and OpGen Argus whole-genome optical mapping, we report here the first complete genome sequence of Yersinia massiliensis The completed genome consists of a 4.99-Mb chromosome, a 121-kb megaplasmid, and a 57-kb plasmid.© Crown copyright 2018.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Meeting report: mobile genetic elements and genome plasticity 2018

The Mobile Genetic Elements and Genome Plasticity conference was hosted by Keystone Symposia in Santa Fe, NM USA, February 11–15, 2018. The organizers were Marlene Belfort, Evan Eichler, Henry Levin and Lynn Maquat. The goal of this conference was to bring together scientists from around the world to discuss the function of transposable elements and their impact on host species. Central themes of the meeting included recent innovations in genome analysis and the role of mobile DNA in disease and evolution. The conference included 200 scientists who participated in poster presentations, short talks selected from abstracts, and invited talks. A…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

De novo genome assembly of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae) developed through a combination of linked-reads and long-read technologies

Long-read sequencing has greatly contributed to the generation of high quality assemblies, albeit at a high cost. It is also not always clear how to combine sequencing platforms. We sequenced the genome of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), the most important pest in the olive fruits agribusiness industry, using Illumina short-reads, mate-pairs, 10x Genomics linked-reads, Pacific Biosciences (PacBio), and Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT). The 10x linked-reads assembly gave the most contiguous assembly with an N50 of 2.16 Mb. Scaffolding the linked-reads assembly using long-reads from ONT gave a more contiguous assembly with scaffold N50 of 4.59 Mb. We also…

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