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Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Movie: Systems biology animation from ‘The new biology’

This systems biology animation depicts the type of connectivity that exists at multiple scales in a living system. Starting at the molecular level, interactions between DNA (red cubes), RNA (blue cubes), proteins (green cubes), and metabolites (yellow cubes) define the core biological processes required for higher order function. Core biological processes are defined by networks of interactions, and these networks in turn can be interacting with each other as well, either within a given cell, between cells in a given tissue, or between organs in a complex organism. By organizing the vast array of molecular phenotypes into networks that define…

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Movie: The new biology part II – cancer

Part II of The New Biology documentary. This documentary film features the wave of cutting-edge technologies that now provide the opportunity to create predictive models of living systems, and gain wisdom about the fundamental nature of life itself. The potential impact for humanity is immense: from fighting complex diseases such as cancer, enabling proactive surveillance of virulent pathogens, and increasing food crop production.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Movie: The new biology part IV – food & conclusion

Part IV of The New Biology documentary. This documentary film features the wave of cutting-edge technologies that now provide the opportunity to create predictive models of living systems, and gain wisdom about the fundamental nature of life itself. The potential impact for humanity is immense: from fighting complex diseases such as cancer, enabling proactive surveillance of virulent pathogens, and increasing food crop production.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Movie: The new biology

This documentary film features the wave of cutting-edge technologies that now provide the opportunity to create predictive models of living systems, and gain wisdom about the fundamental nature of life itself. The potential impact for humanity is immense: from fighting complex diseases such as cancer, enabling proactive surveillance of virulent pathogens, and increasing food crop production.

Read More »

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Movie: The new biology part I – introduction

Part I of The New Biology documentary. This documentary film features the wave of cutting-edge technologies that now provide the opportunity to create predictive models of living systems, and gain wisdom about the fundamental nature of life itself. The potential impact for humanity is immense: from fighting complex diseases such as cancer, enabling proactive surveillance of virulent pathogens, and increasing food crop production.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Movie: The new biology part III – infectious disease

Part III of The New Biology documentary. This documentary film features the wave of cutting-edge technologies that now provide the opportunity to create predictive models of living systems, and gain wisdom about the fundamental nature of life itself. The potential impact for humanity is immense: from fighting complex diseases such as cancer, enabling proactive surveillance of virulent pathogens, and increasing food crop production.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021

ASHG Virtual Poster: De novo assembly of a diploid Asian genome

Yunfei Guo, from the University of Southern California, presents his ASHG 2015 poster on a de novo assembly of a diploid Asian genome. The uniform coverage of long-read sequencing helped access regions previously unresolvable due to high GC bias or long repeats. The assembly allowed scientists to fill some 400 gaps in the latest human reference genome, including some as long as 50 kb.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021

ASHG Virtual Poster: Enrichment of unamplified DNA and long-read SMRT Sequencing to unlock repeat expansion disorders

PacBio’s Jenny Ekholm presents this ASHG 2016 poster on a new method being developed that enriches for unamplified DNA and uses SMRT Sequencing to characterize repeat expansion disorders. Incorporating the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target specific genes allows for amplification-free enrichment to preserve epigenetic information and avoid PCR bias. Internal studies have shown that the approach can successfully be used to target and sequence the CAG repeat responsible for Huntington’s disease, the repeat associated with ALS, and more. The approach allows for pooling many samples and sequencing with a single SMRT Cell.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Nature Webinar: Large interrupted pentanucleotide repeats of SCA10

Tetsuo Ashizawa, Director of the Neuroscience Research Program at Houston Methodist Research Institute, presents a novel amplification-free targeted enrichment method using CRISPR-Cas9 for the disease-causing repeat expansion in SCA10. Using long-read sequencing, he has been able to span multi-kilobase repetitive regions and identify interruption sequence motifs that correlate with alternative clinical phenotypes in individuals from varying ethnic backgrounds. Webinar registration required.

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021

ASHG Virtual Poster: The MHC Diversity in Africa Project (MDAP) pilot – 125 African high resolution HLA types from 5 populations

In this ASHG 2016 poster video, Martin Pollard from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge describes an ambitious project to better represent natural variation in the complex MHC region by sequencing the locus in thousands of people from various populations in Africa. A pilot project in five populations has already revealed a lot of diversity in the region, which is important for human disease, vaccine response, and organ transplantation. Pollard says SMRT Sequencing is the only technology that can deliver the full-length haplotypes necessary to identify complete variation in this highly polymorphic complex. Plus: plans to…

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