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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative evaluation of the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated bacteria.

Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model to explore the molecular exchanges that occur between an animal intestine and associated microbes. Previous studies in Drosophila uncovered a sophisticated web of host responses to intestinal bacteria. The outcomes of these responses define critical events in the host, such as the establishment of immune responses, access to nutrients, and the rate of larval development. Despite our steady march towards illuminating the host machinery that responds to bacterial presence in the gut, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbial products that influence bacterial association with a fly host. We sequenced and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Brevibacterium linens SMQ-1335.

Brevibacterium linens is one of the main bacteria found in the smear of surface-ripened cheeses. The genome of the industrial strain SMQ-1335 was sequenced using PacBio. It has 4,209,935 bp, a 62.6% G+C content, 3,848 open reading frames, and 61 structural RNAs. A new type I restriction-modification system was identified. Copyright © 2016 de Melo et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome and plasmid analysis of blaIMP-4 -carrying Citrobacter freundii B38.

Sequencing of the blaIMP-4 -carrying C. freundii B38 using PacBio SMRT technique revealed that the genome contained a chromosome of 5,134,500 bp, and three plasmids, pOZ172 (127,005 bp), pOZ181 (277,592 bp), and pOZ182 (18,467 bp). Plasmid pOZ172 was identified as IncFIIY, like pP10164-NDM and pNDM-EcGN174. It carries a class 1 integron with four cassettes: blaIMP-4-qacG2-aacA4-aphA15, and a complete hybrid tni module (tniR-tniQ-tniB-tniA). The recombination of tniR from Tn402 (identical) with tniQBA (99%) from Tn5053 occurred within the res site of Tn402/5053. The Tn402/5053-like integron, named Tn6017, was inserted into Tn1722 at the res II site. The replication, partitioning and transfer…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomics reveals Lysinibacillus sphaericus group comprises a novel species.

Early in the 1990s, it was recognized that Lysinibacillus sphaericus, one of the most popular and effective entomopathogenic bacteria, was a highly heterogeneous group. Many authors have even proposed it comprises more than one species, but the lack of phenotypic traits that guarantee an accurate differentiation has not allowed this issue to be clarified. Now that genomic technologies are rapidly advancing, it is possible to address the problem from a whole genome perspective, getting insights into the phylogeny, evolutive history and biology itself.The genome of the Colombian strain L. sphaericus OT4b.49 was sequenced, assembled and annotated, obtaining 3 chromosomal contigs…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic recombination leading to decreased virulence of group B Streptococcus in a mouse model of adult invasive disease.

Adult invasive disease caused by Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is increasing worldwide. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) now permits rapid identification of recombination events, a phenomenon that occurs frequently in GBS. Using WGS, we described that strain NGBS375, a capsular serotype V GBS isolate of sequence type (ST)297, has an ST1 genomic background but has acquired approximately 300 kbp of genetic material likely from an ST17 strain. Here, we examined the virulence of this strain in an in vivo model of GBS adult invasive infection. The mosaic ST297 strain showed intermediate virulence, causing significantly less systemic infection and reduced mortality than a…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Co-infection and emergence of rifamycin resistance during a recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

Clostridium difficile (Peptoclostridium difficile) is a common health care associated infection with a disproportionately high incidence in elderly patients. Disease symptoms range from mild diarrhoea through to life threatening pseudomembranous colitis. Around 20% of patients may suffer recurrent disease which often requires re-hospitalisation of patients.C. difficile was isolated from stool samples from a patient with two recurrent C. difficile infections. PCR-ribotyping, whole genome sequencing and phenotypic assays were used to characterise these isolates.Genotypic and phenotypic screening of C. difficile isolates revealed multiple PCR-ribotypes present, and the emergence of rifamycin resistance during the infection cycle.Understanding both the clinical and bacterial factors…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Active and adaptive Legionella CRISPR-Cas reveals a recurrent challenge to the pathogen.

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats with CRISPR-associated gene (CRISPR-Cas) systems are widely recognized as critical genome defense systems that protect microbes from external threats such as bacteriophage infection. Several isolates of the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila possess multiple CRISPR-Cas systems (type I-C, type I-F and type II-B), yet the targets of these systems remain unknown. With the recent observation that at least one of these systems (II-B) plays a non-canonical role in supporting intracellular replication, the possibility remained that these systems are vestigial genome defense systems co-opted for other purposes. Our data indicate that this is not the case.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Completed genome sequences of strains from 36 serotypes of Salmonella.

We report here the completed closed genome sequences of strains representing 36 serotypes of Salmonella. These genome sequences will provide useful references for understanding the genetic variation between serotypes, particularly as references for mapping of raw reads or to create assemblies of higher quality, as well as to aid in studies of comparative genomics of Salmonella.© Crown copyright 2018.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Bacillus sp. strain UFRGS-B20, a hydrocarbon degrader.

Bacillus sp. strain UFRGS-B20 was isolated in 2012 from Brazilian land-farming soil contaminated with petrochemical oily sludge. This strain was subjected to hydrocarbon biodegradation tests, showing degradation rates of up to 60%. Here, we present the 6.82-Mb draft genome sequence of the strain, which contains 2,178 proteins with functional assignments.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequences of five Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from farmed animals and wildlife in Canada.

Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, an infectious disease that affects both animals and humans and thus presents a risk to public health and the livestock industry. Here, we report the genome sequences of five Mycobacterium bovis strains that represent major genotype clusters observed in farmed animals and wildlife in Canada.© Crown copyright 2018.

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