X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Thursday, November 12, 2020

Technical Note: Preparing samples for PacBio whole genome sequencing for de novo assembly – Collection and storage

Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing uses the natural process of DNA replication to sequence long fragments of native DNA. As such, starting with high-quality, high molecular weight (HMW) genomic DNA (gDNA) will result in better sequencing performance across difficult to sequence regions of the genome. To obtain the highest quality, long DNA it is important to start with sample types compatible with HMW DNA extraction methods. This technical note is intended to give general guidance on sample collection, preparation, and storage across a range of commonly encountered sample types used for SMRT Sequencing whole genome projects. It is important to…

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: A fungal transcriptome uses complex and double-edged isoforms to split wood

From USDA’s Agricultural Research Service, molecular biologist Sean Gordon discusses the need for long-read sequencing to map an organism’s transcriptome. His team analyzed the wood-decaying fungus Plicaturopsis crispa first with short reads and found that they were missing exons and other important information. They switched to SMRT Sequencing so they could observe, rather than infer, full-length transcripts.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

Seminar: Optimizing eukaryotic de novo genome assembly with long-read sequencing

This seminar features great hands-on information and best practices for analyzing SMRT Sequencing data for eukaryotic genome assembly. Michael Schatz provides an overview of the assembly tools, provides recommendations for when to use each one, and discusses the challenges of short-read assemblies. James Gurtowski gives an in-depth overview of hybrid assemblies methods, where short read data are used used to correct errors in longer reads. Finally, Sergey Koren presents on chromosome-scale assembly, including the MinHash Alignment Process (MHAP) he developed to dramatically reduce the computational processing power required for genome assemblies.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

Webinar: DNA quality requirements for single-molecule sequencing

Dr. Olga Vinnere Pettersson, Uppsala Genome Center (Uppsala University), presents best practices for qualifying genomic DNA from a variety of sources to be suitable for Single Molecule, Real-Time Sequencing. Factors that affect single molecule sequencing and recommendations for extracting high-quality genomic DNA will be described. (requires file download to view)

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Diploid genome assembly and comprehensive haplotype sequence reconstruction

Jason Chin, senior director of bioinformatics at PacBio, talks about using long-read sequence data to generate diploid genome assemblies to produce comprehensive haplotype sequence reconstructions. In the presentation, Chin describes the FALCON Unzip process that combines SNP phasing with the assembly process and allows for determination of the haplotype sequences and identification of structural variants. He presents an example of diploid assembly from inbred Arabidopsis strains.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

Tutorial: HGAP4 de novo assembly application [SMRT Link v5.0.0]

This tutorial provides an overview of the Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process (HGAP4) de novo assembly analysis application. HGAP4 generates accurate de novo assemblies using only PacBio data. HGAP4 is suitable for assembling a wide range of genome sizes and complexity. HGAP4 now includes some support for diploid-aware assembly. This tutorial covers features of SMRT Link v5.0.0.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

Webinar: Understanding, curating, and analyzing your diploid genome assembly

The goal of this session is to help users complete their PacBio genome assembly and generate the best resource for their research. Kingan begins with a brief review of the diploid assembly process used by FALCON and FALCON-Unzip, highlighting the enhanced phasing of the Unzip module, and concluding with recommendations for genome polishing. Next, she explores how heterozygosity can influence the assembly process and how read coverage depth along the assembly can reveal important characteristics of assembly structure. Kingan then recommends approaches, including specific tools, that can be used to quality filter and curate the assembly, including annotation-, coverage-, and…

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

Webinar: SMRT Sequencing applications in plant and animal sciences: an overview

In this webinar, Emily Hatas of PacBio shares information about the applications and benefits of SMRT Sequencing in plant and animal biology, agriculture, and industrial research fields. This session contains an overview of several applications: whole-genome sequencing for de novo assembly; transcript isoform sequencing (Iso-Seq) method for genome annotation; targeted sequencing solutions; and metagenomics and microbial interactions. High-level workflows and best practices are discussed for key applications.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

User Group Meeting: No Assembly Required – Making the most of Iso-Seq data

In this PacBio User Group Meeting presentation, PacBio scientist Kristin Mars speaks about recent updates, such as the single-day library prep that’s now possible with the Iso-Seq Express workflow. She also notes that one SMRT Cell 8M is sufficient for most Iso-Seq experiments for whole transcriptome sequencing at an affordable price.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Endless forms: Genomes from the Darwin Tree of Life Project

Mark Blaxter, project lead of the Sanger Institute’s Darwin Tree of Life, shared an update of the ambitious effort to sequence all 60,000 species believed to be on the British Isles over the next 12 years in this presentation at the PAG 2020 Conference. The Sanger team has already generated data for 94 species, including 44 new moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera) PacBio assemblies, which Blaxter describes in this presentation.

Read More »

Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Phylogenetic insights into the endophyte symbiosis using PacBio ribosomal DNA sequencing

Jana U’Ren of the University of Arizona discusses the fungi that live inside of plants at a PacBio workshop at the PAG 2020 conference. U’Ren studies the biology and evolution of mycorrhizal fungi found in the photosynthetic tissue of plant leaves, which are grouped together functionally as endophytes. In this video, she shares some of her preliminary findings collecting and analyzing samples from Boreal forests around the world.

Read More »

1 2 3 60

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives