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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: Conservation genomics of a critically endangered Hawaiian bird: A high quality genome assembly of the ‘alala will assist in population management and reintroduction

Oliver Ryder speaks about efforts to rescue the Hawaiian crow, a bird that has been extinct in the wild since 2002, and reintroduce it to its native habitat. Critical to this work is a new SMRT Sequencing reference genome assembly, which Ryder says is already one of the best avian assemblies out there. The resource may help deal with challenges like inbreeding and disease susceptibility.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: An extreme metabolism: Iso-Seq analysis of the ruby-throated hummingbird transcriptome

Winston Timp from Johns Hopkins University studies the metabolism of hummingbirds, which sustain the highest metabolic rates among all vertebrates. Notably, hummingbirds can switch rapidly between a fuel of lipids to newly ingested sugars. This remarkable metabolism is supported by enzymes which operate at the extreme limit of catalytic efficiency. Understanding the molecular basis of enzymatic action will provide a foundation enabling rational engineering of metabolic circuits in other systems. To do this, Dr. Timp and his team generated a de novo transcriptome of the hummingbird liver using the Iso-Seq method. Characterization of the resulting protein coding sequences provides clues…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Conference: Long-read sequence of the gorilla genome

Christopher Hill presents data from efforts to produce reference-grade assemblies for the great ape species. Using SMRT Sequencing, Hill and his colleagues are generating assemblies with much higher contiguity to resolve repetitive and other particularly complex regions. In this talk, he focuses on data from their new high-quality gorilla assembly.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Identification and characterization of informative genetic structural variants for neurodegenerative diseases

Michael Lutz, from the Duke University Medical Center, discussed a recently published software tool that can now be used in a pipeline with SMRT Sequencing data to find structural variant biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases with a focus on Alzheimer’s disease, ALS, and Lewy body dementia. His team is particularly interested in short sequence repeats and short tandem repeats, which have already been implicated in neurodegenerative disease.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: De novo sequencing of the koala genome

Rebecca Johnson, director of the Australian Museum Research Institute presents finding from de novo sequencing of the koala genome. Using PacBio sequencing the Koala Genome Consortium obtained an assembly with an N50 of 11.5 Mbp and have undertaken functional genomic analysis highlighting the unique genes associated with lactation and immune function of koalas. Johnson goes on to describe efforts to obtain a chromosome level assembly and current work using ‘super scaffolding’ to compare shared synteny across diverse lineages to generate chromosome scaffold maps.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG PacBio Workshop: Comparative analyses of next generation technologies for generating chromosome-level reference genome assemblies

At PAG 2017, Rockefeller University’s Erich Jarvis offered an in-depth comparison of methods for generating highly contiguous genome assemblies, using hummingbird as the basis to evaluate a number of sequencing and scaffolding technologies. Analyses include gene content, error rate, chromosome metrics, and more. Plus: a long-read look at four genes associated with vocal learning.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Domestication: through the canines of a dingo

In this PAG 2018 presentation, Bill Ballard of University of New South Wales, presents research into the origins and potential domestication of the Australian dingo, winner of the 2017 SMRT Grant Program. Ballard used PacBio long-read whole genome sequencing to sequence and assemble the dingo genome. Ongoing work focuses on identifying common and unique genomic regions with a domestic dog genome to better understand shared ancestry and ultimately to aid in dingo conservation efforts.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Webinar: Assembling high-quality genomes to solve nature’s mysteries

In this webinar, Barbara Block of Stanford University and Paul Peluso of PacBio describe how plant and animal whole genome sequencing remains a challenging endeavor, particularly due to genome size, high density of repetitive elements, and heterozygosity. Because of this, often only a single, fragmented reference genome is available for a species, genus, or even family, limiting the ability to answer important biological questions. Looking at the trends in genome assembly and annotation over the past year, such as pan-genomes and phasing, this webinar explores how Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing is utilized to develop long-lasting genomic resources, supporting research…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: How SMRT Sequencing is accelerating plant and animal genomics

In this presentation, Justin Blethrow provides an overview of recent and upcoming developments across PacBio’s SMRT Sequencing product portfolio, and their implications for PacBio’s major applications. In presenting the product roadmap, he illustrates how key new products coming in 2019 will make SMRT Sequencing dramatically more affordable and easy to use, and how they will enable customers to routinely produce highly accurate, single-molecule long reads.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: The Bat1K project: bat genome, biology and implications

In this presentation, Sonja Vernes of the Max Plank Institute shares her work with the Bat1K project which aims to catalog the genetic diversity of all living bat species. She highlights the unique biology of bats, from their widely varying sizes to their capacity for healthy aging and disease resistance and provides recent findings from ongoing efforts to sequence and annotate the genomes of 21 phylogenetic families of bats.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Endless forms: Genomes from the Darwin Tree of Life Project

Mark Blaxter, project lead of the Sanger Institute’s Darwin Tree of Life, shared an update of the ambitious effort to sequence all 60,000 species believed to be on the British Isles over the next 12 years in this presentation at the PAG 2020 Conference. The Sanger team has already generated data for 94 species, including 44 new moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera) PacBio assemblies, which Blaxter describes in this presentation.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Video: Introduction to PacBio highly accurate long-read sequencing

PacBio Sequencing is powered by Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing technology. The Sequel II System offers the affordable, highly accurate long reads needed to gain comprehensive views of genomes, transcriptomes, and epigenomes. Watch this video to get to know the Sequel II System, explore the key advantages of SMRT Sequencing, and learn how its applications can be used to drive new discoveries.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Webinar: Beyond a single reference genome – The advantages of sequencing multiple individuals

Hear how scientists have used PacBio sequencing to develop pangenome collections and to study population genetics of plant and animal species to power their research. Learn about the advantages of sequencing multiple individuals to gain comprehensive views of genetic variation, and understand the speed, cost, and accuracy benefits of using highly accurate long reads (HiFi reads) to sequence your species of interest.

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