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Sunday, July 7, 2019

CTX-M-65 extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing Salmonella enterica serotype infantis, United States.

Extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs) confer resistance to clinically important third-generation cephalosporins, which are often used to treat invasive salmonellosis. In the United States, ESBLs are rarely found in Salmonella. However, in 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration found blaCTX-M-65 ESBL-producing Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis in retail chicken meat. The isolate had a rare pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. To clarify the sources and potential effects on human health, we examined isolates with this pattern obtained from human surveillance and associated metadata. Using broth microdilution for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and whole-genome sequencing, we characterized the isolates. Of 34 isolates, 29 carried the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The ß-lactamase gene profile and a plasmid-carrying multiple heavy metal resistance genes of Enterobacter cloacae.

In this work, by high-throughput sequencing, antibiotic resistance genes, including class A (blaCTX-M, blaZ, blaTEM, blaVEB, blaKLUC, and blaSFO), class C (blaSHV, blaDHA, blaMIR, blaAZECL-29, and blaACT), and class D (blaOXA) ß-lactamase genes, were identified among the pooled genomic DNA from 212 clinical Enterobacter cloacae isolates. Six blaMIR-positive E. cloacae strains were identified, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that these strains were not clonally related. The complete genome of the blaMIR-positive strain (Y546) consisted of both a chromosome (4.78?Mb) and a large plasmid pY546 (208.74?kb). The extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs) (blaSHV-12 and blaCTX-M-9a) and AmpC (blaMIR) were encoded on the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus koreensis 26-25, a ginsenoside converting bacterium, isolated from Korean kimchi

A Gram-positive, rod-shaped, ivory colored, and motile, Lactobacillus koreensis 26-25 was isolated from Korean kimchi. Strain 26-25 showed the ability of conversion from major ginsenosides into minor ginsenosides for which whole genome was sequenced. The whole genome sequence of Lactobacillus koreensis 26-25 consisted of one circular chromosome comprised of 3,006,812 bp, with a DNA G + C content of 49.23%. The whole genome analysis of strain 26-25 showed many glycosides hydrolase genes, which may contribute to identify the genes responsible for transformation of major ginsenosides into minor ginsenosides for its high pharmacological effects.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Olsenella sp. KGMB 04489 isolated from healthy Korean human feces

The genus of Olsenella has been isolated from vertebrate animal mouth, rumen, and feces. Olsenella sp. KGMB 04489 was isolated from fecal samples obtained from a healthy Korean. The whole-genome sequence of Olsenella sp. KGMB 04489 was analyzed using the PacBio Sequel platform. The genome comprises a 2,108,034 bp chromosome with a G + C content of 65.50%, 1,838 total genes, 13 rRNA genes, and 52 tRNA genes. Also, we found that strain KGMB 04489 had some genes for hydrolysis enzymes, and antibiotic biosynthesis and resistance in its genome based on the result of genome analysis.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus licheniformis strain 0DA23-1, a potential starter culture candidate for soybean fermentation

Bacillus licheniformis strain 0DA23-1, a potential fermentation starter candidate, was isolated from doenjang, a Korean high-salt-fermented soybean food. Strain 0DA23-1 contains a single circular 4,405,373-bp chromosome with a G + C content of 45.96%. The complete genome of strain 0DA23-1 does not include any of the virulence factors found in the well-known pathogens Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. Additionally, no genes associated with resistance to eight antibiotics (chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin), hemolysis, or biofilm formation were identified.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome of the multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain KBN10P04869 isolated from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

Recently, we isolated a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain KBN10P04869 from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia. We report the complete genome of this strain which consists of 5,104,264 bp with 4,457 protein-coding genes, 88 tRNAs, and 22 rRNAs, and the co-occurrence of multidrug- resistant genes including bla CMY-2, bla TEM-1, bla CTX-M-15, bla NDM-5, and blaOXA-18.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Alignment-free genome comparison enables accurate geographic sourcing of white oak DNA.

The application of genomic data and bioinformatics for the identification of restricted or illegally-sourced natural products is urgently needed. The taxonomic identity and geographic provenance of raw and processed materials have implications in sustainable-use commercial practices, and relevance to the enforcement of laws that regulate or restrict illegally harvested materials, such as timber. Improvements in genomics make it possible to capture and sequence partial-to-complete genomes from challenging tissues, such as wood and wood products.In this paper, we report the success of an alignment-free genome comparison method, [Formula: see text] that differentiates different geographic sources of white oak (Quercus) species with…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Hardwood tree genomics: Unlocking woody plant biology.

Woody perennial angiosperms (i.e., hardwood trees) are polyphyletic in origin and occur in most angiosperm orders. Despite their independent origins, hardwoods have shared physiological, anatomical, and life history traits distinct from their herbaceous relatives. New high-throughput DNA sequencing platforms have provided access to numerous woody plant genomes beyond the early reference genomes of Populus and Eucalyptus, references that now include willow and oak, with pecan and chestnut soon to follow. Genomic studies within these diverse and undomesticated species have successfully linked genes to ecological, physiological, and developmental traits directly. Moreover, comparative genomic approaches are providing insights into speciation events while…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Reference genes for RT-qPCR normalisation in different tissues, developmental stages and stress conditions of Hypericum perforatum

Hypericum perforatum is a widely known medicinal herb used mostly as a remedy for depression because of its abundant secondary metabolites. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is an optimized method for the efficient and reliable quantification of gene expression studies. In general, reference genes are used in qRT-PCR analysis because of their known or suspected housekeeping roles. However, their expression level cannot be assumed to remain stable under all possible experimental conditions. Thus, the identification of high quality reference genes is very necessary for the interpretation of qRT-PCR data. In this study, we investigated the expression of fourteen candidate genes, including…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

De novo genome assembly of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae) developed through a combination of linked-reads and long-read technologies

Long-read sequencing has greatly contributed to the generation of high quality assemblies, albeit at a high cost. It is also not always clear how to combine sequencing platforms. We sequenced the genome of the olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), the most important pest in the olive fruits agribusiness industry, using Illumina short-reads, mate-pairs, 10x Genomics linked-reads, Pacific Biosciences (PacBio), and Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT). The 10x linked-reads assembly gave the most contiguous assembly with an N50 of 2.16 Mb. Scaffolding the linked-reads assembly using long-reads from ONT gave a more contiguous assembly with scaffold N50 of 4.59 Mb. We also…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The Draft Genome of the MD-2 Pineapple

The main challenge in assembling plant genome is its ploidy level, repeats content, and polymorphism. The second-generation sequencing delivered the throughput and the accuracy that is crucial to whole-genome sequencing but insufficient and remained challenging for some plant species. It is known that genomes produced by next-gen- eration sequencing produced small contigs that would inflate the number of annotated genes (Varshney et al. 2011) and missed on the transposable elements that are abun- dant in plant genome due to their repetitive nature (Michael and Jackson 2013).

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The complete genome sequence of a marine sponge-associated bacteria, Bacillus safensis KCTC 12796BP, which produces the anti-allergic compounds

The full genome sequence of Bacillus safensis KCTC 12796BP which had been isolated from the marine sponge in the seawater of Jeju Island, was determined by Pac-Bio next- generation sequencing system. A circular chromosome in the length of 3,935,874 bp was obtained in addition to a circular form of plasmid having 36,690 bp. The G + C content of chromosome was 41.4%, and that of plasmid was 37.3%. The number of deduced CDSs in the chromosome was 3,980, whereas 36 CDS regions were determined in a plasmid. Among the deduced CDSs in chromosome, 81 tRNA genes and 24 rRNA genes…

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