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Monday, March 30, 2020

PAG Conference: Dawn of the crop pangenome era

To make improvements to crops like corn, soybeans, and canola, scientists at Corteva are building a compendium of crop genomics resources to provide actionable sequence info for genetic discovery, gene-editing, and seed product development. Hear how Kevin Fengler, Comparative Genomics Lead of Data Science and Bioinformatics at Corteva, is using PacBio sequences to build visualization tools and genome assembly pipelines as a contribution to this effort.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

Webinar: Best practices for working with PacBio tools (SMRT Link & developmental) on the command line

This webinar, presented by Roberto Lleras, provides the best practices for working with PacBio tools (SMRT Link and Developmental) on the command line. Please access this file for step-by-step instructions for installing SMRT Analysis tools and pbbioconda in order to analyze SMRT Sequencing data on the command line: https://www.pacb.com/wp-content/uploads/Bioinformatics-Webinar-Session-1-Getting-Started.pdf

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Monday, March 30, 2020

Webinar: Long-read sequencing and infectious disease: New insights into longstanding challenges

One of the longstanding challenges in infectious disease has been the lack of high-quality reference genomes. However, developments in genome sequencing are helping researchers overcome this barrier. Recently, highly contiguous genome assemblies of Plasmodium falciparum, Aedes aegypti, and multiple trypanosomes have become available. The number of reference genomes for bacteria that cause infectious disease is similarly expanding rapidly. In this webinar Meredith Ashby discusses how these new resources are already yielding new biological insights into critical questions in infectious disease research, including how parasites evade the immune system add how pathogens are adapting to evolutionary pressures.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

User Group Meeting: Lowering input requirements

To start Day 2 of the PacBio User Group Meeting, Jonas Korlach, PacBio CSO, provides an update on lowering DNA input amounts for SMRT Sequencing workflows. Updates include a more robust shearing method, a revised AMPure size selection, and introduction of multiplexing low input samples. Finally, the use of HiFi sequencing with low input results in a more complete genome assembly. Jonas closes by mentioning that the low DNA input protocol is now available and further advancements to lower input requirements even more will open opportunities for different samples, such as cancer needle biopsies.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

Webinar: Smoking out structural variants in the cannabis genome

In this webinar, Sarah Kingan, Staff Scientist, PacBio, and Kevin McKernan, Founder and Chief Science Officer, Medicinal Genomics, describe their work assembling the most comprehensive and complete cannabis genome of a Type II (THCA and CBDA producing) plant. They also share the latest advances in cannabis genomics, including how PacBio long-read sequencing enables high-quality genomics research in plants, annotation of the cannabis reference genome using full-length transcript sequencing, and new insights into cannabinoid synthesis across different types of cannabis plants.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

User Group Meeting: Targeted PacBio Sequencing using Sage HLS-CATCH

In this PacBio User Group Meeting presentation, Mount Sinai’s Ethan Ellis presents results from the HLS-CATCH method, which involves the use of the SageHLS instrument with CRISPR design methods to target and extract large genomic fragments for sequencing while avoiding pseudogenes and other confounding regions.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

Webinar: Complete genomes within reach – Closing bacterial genomes from the lakes of Minnesota to NYC hospitals

In this webinar, Ben Auch, Research Scientist, Innovation Lab, University of Minnesota Genomics Center, Cody Sheik, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Minnesota Duluth, and Harm van Bakel, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai provide details of the newly updated microbial whole genome sequencing pipeline, which leverages the multiplexing capabilities of the Sequel System, share new insights into the ecophysiology of Minnesota microbes using long-read sequencing, and show of how whole genome sequencing is used in pathogen surveillance programs at hospitals.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

AGBT Presentation: Feed the World – Developing genomic resources for insects as food

In a push to develop insect-based food sources for people, Brenda Oppert from the USDA has been sequencing bug genomes with PacBio technology. Long reads are essential because of the highly repetitive sequences and large genomes. On the Sequel II System, a single SMRT Cell is sufficient to generate 350-fold coverage and produce a high-quality assembly for some of the insects she’s studying.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

User Group Meeting: No Assembly Required – Making the most of Iso-Seq data

In this PacBio User Group Meeting presentation, PacBio scientist Kristin Mars speaks about recent updates, such as the single-day library prep that’s now possible with the Iso-Seq Express workflow. She also notes that one SMRT Cell 8M is sufficient for most Iso-Seq experiments for whole transcriptome sequencing at an affordable price.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

PAG Conference: Endless forms: Genomes from the Darwin Tree of Life Project

Mark Blaxter, project lead of the Sanger Institute’s Darwin Tree of Life, shared an update of the ambitious effort to sequence all 60,000 species believed to be on the British Isles over the next 12 years in this presentation at the PAG 2020 Conference. The Sanger team has already generated data for 94 species, including 44 new moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera) PacBio assemblies, which Blaxter describes in this presentation.

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Monday, March 30, 2020

User Group Meeting: Using grizzly bears to unlock the biomedical promise of hibernation

In this PacBio User Group Meeting presentation, Shawn Trojahn of Washington State University describes transcriptome sequencing and analysis of grizzly bears focused on differential gene expression during hibernation and active cycles, potentially offering human-relevant information about muscle atrophy and insulin resistance. The team was able to identify more unique isoforms just from liver tissue than had been previously characterized in the entire reference genome. Of particular interest: more than 2,000 transcripts differentially expressed between hibernation and active season, including 86 genes that have isoforms expressed in opposite directions.

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