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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Podcast: Long-read sequencing dramatically improves blood matching – Steven Marsh

One of the popular questions on the Mendelspod program is how those doing sequencing decide between the quality of PacBio’s long reads and the cheaper short read technology, such as that of Illumina or Thermo Fisher. Steve Marsh, the Director of Bioinformatics at the Anthony Nolan Research Institute in London, provides the most clear and dramatic answer yet: use the PacBio system exclusively. Established in 1974 by the mother of a boy with a rare blood disease, the Anthony Nolan Institute is a world leader in blood crossmatching and donor/patient registries. Steve and his team at the Institute have dramatically…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Webinar: Benefits of SMRT Sequencing for HLA typing at Anthony Nolan

Neema Mayor from Anthony Nolan Research Institute offers an introduction to the challenges of characterizing the HLA region, noting that improvements in resolution have allowed scientists to dramatically expand the number of classifications used to match donors to recipients. As sequencing resolution improves, Mayor says, scientists expect to find even more polymorphisms than what has been already catalogued.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

Xtalks Webinar: Long genomic DNA fragment capture and SMRT Sequencing enables accurate phasing of cancer and HLA loci

In this webinar, the presenters describe a targeted sequencing workflow that combines Roche NimbleGen’s SeqCap EZ enrichment technology with PacBio’ SMRT Sequencing to provide a more comprehensive view of variants and haplotype information over multi-kilobase, contiguous regions. They demonstrate that 6 kb fragments can also be utilized to enrich for long fragments that extend beyond the targeted capture site and well into (and often across) the adjacent intronic regions. When combined with SMRT Sequencing, multi-kilobase genomic regions can be phased and variants, including complex structural variants, can be detected in exons, introns and intergenic regions.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Medical diagnostic challenges and structural variation detection using the PacBio Platform

Richard Gibbs, Director of Baylor College of Medicine’s Human Genome Sequencing Center, talked about the transition to genomic medicine. This hasn’t been as simple as people would like due to such issues as the incomplete reference genome, the difficulty in characterizing some variation, and the lack of knowledge about the function of some genes. At Baylor, most of the human genome sequencing is done for children with Mendelian disorders. He said that among 7,000 samples processed using short-read exome sequencing, only about 25% of these cases are solved. The relatively low diagnosis rate is likely due to structural variation and…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

ASHG PacBio Workshop: Going beyond the $1,000 genome? – the future of high quality de novo human genomes, epigenomes and transcriptomes?

Jonas Korlach, Chief Scientific Officer at PacBio, discussed the technology waves that have followed the initial human genome sequencing project, where we are today, and where we are going. Today, we are in what Korlach calls the 4th wave, where more comprehensive whole-genome re-sequencing is occurring, and we are nearing the 5th, when we will actually be able to free ourselves from reference genomes and sequence everything de novo.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Roche and PacBio Workshop: Towards precision medicine

Euan Ashley speaks about precision medicine and said clinical-grade analysis has been limited by complex regions in the human genome. His key theme,”Precision medicine needs to be accurate medicine,” was illustrated with several examples where short-read sequencing or traditional clinical sequencing methods failed to be accurate. Also included: targeted RNA sequencing and gene phasing with long-read sequencing.

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

PAG Conference: Long reads sequencing technology to solve complex genomic regions assembly in plants

Hélène Berges, managing director of the Plant Genomic Center at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA) in Toulouse, France, discusses how obtaining accurate and reliable sequence data is still challenging when targeting specific genomic regions. These issues are even more noticeable for complex plant genomes. To overcome these issues, Dr. Berges and her team have developed a strategy to reduce the genome complexity by using the large insert BAC libraries combined with next-generation sequencing technologies. She compares different technologies to sequence pools of BAC clones from several species (maize, wheat, strawberry, barley, sugarcane, and sunflower) known to be…

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Sunday, October 25, 2020

AGBT Virtual Poster: SMRT Sequencing for the detection of low-frequency somatic variants

Steve Kujawa from PacBio presents an AGBT poster reporting a study that characterized the use of SMRT Sequencing for the detection of low-frequency somatic variants. A multiplexed reference standard was amplified using the Multiplicom assay and sequenced on both the PacBio RS II and MiSeq System. Results indicate good concordance between the sequencing platforms, even at very low mutation frequencies.

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