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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Characterization of Reference Materials for Genetic Testing of CYP2D6 Alleles: A GeT-RM Collaborative Project.

Pharmacogenetic testing increasingly is available from clinical and research laboratories. However, only a limited number of quality control and other reference materials currently are available for the complex rearrangements and rare variants that occur in the CYP2D6 gene. To address this need, the Division of Laboratory Systems, CDC-based Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination Program, in collaboration with members of the pharmacogenetic testing and research communities and the Coriell Cell Repositories (Camden, NJ), has characterized 179 DNA samples derived from Coriell cell lines. Testing included the recharacterization of 137 genomic DNAs that were genotyped in previous Genetic Testing Reference Material Coordination…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete genome sequence of Antarcticibacterium flavum JB01H24T from an Antarctic marine sediment

Antarcticibacterium flavum JB01H24T was isolated from a marine sediment of the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Whole-genome sequencing of the strain Antarcticibacterium flavum JB01H24T was achieved using PacBio RS II platform. The resulting complete genome comprised of one closed, complete chromosome of 4,319,074 base pairs with a 40.87% G?+?C content, where genomic analyses demonstrated that it is constituted mostly by putative ORFs with unknown functions, representing a novel genetic feature. It is the first complete genome sequence of the Antarcticibacterium strain.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

The complete genome sequence and comparative genome analysis of the multi-drug resistant food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus.

Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic human pathogen causing food-borne gastrointestinal infections and non-gastrointestinal infections worldwide. The strain B. cereus FORC_013 was isolated from fried eel. Its genome was completely sequenced by PacBio technology, analyzed and compared with other complete genome sequences of Bacillus to elucidate the distinct pathogenic features of the strain isolated in South Korea. Genomic analysis revealed pathogenesis and host immune evasion-associated genes encoding tissue-destructive exoenzymes, and pore-forming toxins. In particular, tissue-destructive (hemolysin BL, nonhaemolytic enterotoxins) and cytolytic proteins (cytolysin) were observed in the genome, which damage the plasma membrane of the epithelial cells of the small intestine…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Tracking short-term changes in the genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of OXA-232-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST14 in clinical settings.

To track stepwise changes in genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance in rapidly evolving OXA-232-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST14, an emerging carbapenem-resistant high-risk clone, in clinical settings.Twenty-six K. pneumoniae ST14 isolates were collected by the Korean Nationwide Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance system over the course of 1 year. Isolates were subjected to whole-genome sequencing and MIC determinations using 33 antibiotics from 14 classes.Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing identified 72 unique SNP sites spanning the chromosomes of the isolates, dividing them into three clusters (I, II and III). The initial isolate possessed two plasmids with 18 antibiotic-resistance genes, including blaOXA-232, and exhibited resistance to 11 antibiotic…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Identification and characterization of chicken circovirus from commercial broiler chickens in China.

Circoviruses are found in many species, including mammals, birds, lower vertebrates and invertebrates. To date, there are no reports of circovirus-induced diseases in chickens. In this study, we identified a new strain of chicken circovirus (CCV) by PacBio third-generation sequencing samples from chickens with acute gastroenteritis in a Shandong commercial broiler farm in China. The complete genome of CCV was verified by inverse PCR. Genomic analysis revealed that CCV codes two inverse open reading frames (ORFs), and a potential stem-loop structure was present at the 5′ end with a structure typical of a circular virus. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

A comparison of immunoglobulin IGHV, IGHD and IGHJ genes in wild-derived and classical inbred mouse strains.

The genomes of classical inbred mouse strains include genes derived from all three major subspecies of the house mouse, Mus musculus. We recently posited that genetic diversity in the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene loci of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice reflect differences in subspecies origin. To investigate this hypothesis, we conducted high-throughput sequencing of IGH gene rearrangements to document IGH variable (IGHV), joining (IGHJ), and diversity (IGHD) genes in four inbred wild-derived mouse strains (CAST/EiJ, LEWES/EiJ, MSM/MsJ, and PWD/PhJ), and a single disease model strain (NOD/ShiLtJ), collectively representing genetic backgrounds of several major mouse subspecies. A total of 341 germline…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

A bird’s white-eye view on neosex chromosome evolution

Chromosomal organization is relatively stable among avian species, especially with regards to sex chromosomes. Members of the large Sylvioidea clade however have a pair of neo-sex chromosomes which is unique to this clade and originate from a parallel translocation of a region of the ancestral 4A chromosome on both W and Z chromosomes. Here, we took advantage of this unusual event to study the early stages of sex chromosome evolution. To do so, we sequenced a female (ZW) of two Sylvioidea species, a Zosterops borbonicus and a Z. pallidus. Then, we organized the Z. borbonicus scaffolds along chromosomes and annotated…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Analyses of the Complete Genome Sequence of the Strain Bacillus pumilus ZB201701 Isolated from Rhizosphere Soil of Maize under Drought and Salt Stress.

Bacillus pumilus ZB201701 is a rhizobacterium with the potential to promote plant growth and tolerance to drought and salinity stress. We herein present the complete genome sequence of the Gram-positive bacterium B. pumilus ZB201701, which consists of a linear chromosome with 3,640,542 base pairs, 3,608 protein-coding sequences, 24 ribosomal RNAs, and 80 transfer RNAs. Genome analyses using bioinformatics revealed some of the putative gene clusters involved in defense mechanisms. In addition, activity analyses of the strain under salt and simulated drought stress suggested its potential tolerance to abiotic stress. Plant growth-promoting bacteria-based experiments indicated that the strain promotes the salt…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Characterization of Extracellular Biosurfactants Expressed by a Pseudomonas putida Strain Isolated from the Interior of Healthy Roots from Sida hermaphrodita Grown in a Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil.

Pseudomonas putida E41 isolated from root interior of Sida hermaphrodita (grown on a field contaminated with heavy metals) showed high biosurfactant activity. In this paper, we describe data from mass spectrometry and genome analysis, to improve our understanding on the phenotypic properties of the strain. Supernatant derived from P. putida E41 liquid culture exhibited a strong decrease in the surface tension accompanied by the ability for emulsion stabilization. We identified extracellular lipopeptides, putisolvin I and II expression but did not detect rhamnolipids. Their presence was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) TOF/TOF technique. Moreover, ten phospholipids (mainly phosphatidylethanolamines…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete Genome Sequence of strain WHRI 3811, race 1 of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the Causal Agent of Black Rot of Cruciferous Vegetables.

Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is an important bacterial pathogen that causes black rot and brings about enormous production loss for cruciferous vegetables worldwide. Currently, genome sequences for only a few Xcc isolates are available, most of which are draft ones. Based on the next-generation sequencing (NGS) and single-molecule sequencing in real time (SMRT) technologies, we present here the complete genome sequence of strain WHRI 3811, race 1 of Xcc, which is a type strain that has been extensively used. The genome data will contribute to our understanding of Xcc genomic features, and pave the way for research on Xcc-host…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Cultured Epidermal Autografts from Clinically Revertant Skin as a Potential Wound Treatment for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

Inherited skin disorders have been reported recently to have sporadic normal-looking areas, where a portion of the keratinocytes have recovered from causative gene mutations (revertant mosaicism). We observed a case of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa treated with cultured epidermal autografts (CEAs), whose CEA-grafted site remained epithelized for 16 years. We proved that the CEA product and the grafted area included cells with revertant mosaicism. Based on these findings, we conducted an investigator-initiated clinical trial of CEAs from clinically revertant skin for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. The donor sites were analyzed by genetic analysis, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and quantification of the…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Haplotype-Resolved Cattle Genomes Provide Insights Into Structural Variation and Adaptation

We present high quality, phased genome assemblies representative of taurine and indicine cattle, subspecies that differ markedly in productivity-related traits and environmental adaptation. We report a new haplotype-aware scaffolding and polishing pipeline using contigs generated by the trio binning method to produce haplotype-resolved, chromosome-level genome assemblies of Angus (taurine) and Brahman (indicine) cattle breeds. These assemblies were used to identify structural and copy number variants that differentiate the subspecies and we found variant detection was sensitive to the specific reference genome chosen. Six gene families with immune related functions are expanded in the indicine lineage. Assembly of the genomes of…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Construction and comparison of three reference-quality genome assemblies for soybean.

We report reference-quality genome assemblies and annotations for two accessions of soybean (Glycine max) and one of Glycine soja, the closest wild relative of G. max. The G. max assemblies are for widely used U.S. cultivars: the northern line ‘Williams 82’ (Wm82); and the southern line ‘Lee’. The Wm82 assembly improves the prior published assembly, and the Lee and G. soja assemblies are new for these accessions. Comparisons among the three accessions show generally high structural conservation, but nucleotide difference of 1.7 SNPs/kb between Wm82 and Lee, and 4.7 SNPs/kb between these lines and G. soja. SNP distributions and comparisons…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Complete Genome Sequence of a Chlorobenzene Degrader, Pandoraea pnomenusa MCB032.

Chlorobenzenes are ubiquitously distributed, highly persistent, and toxic environmental contaminants. Pandoraea pnomenusa MCB032 was isolated as a new dominant chlorobenzene-utilizing strain from a functionally stable bioreactor during the treatment of chlorobenzenes when strain Burkholderia sp. JS150 disappeared. In study, we report the complete genome sequence of strain MCB032 which consists of a circular chromosome and three plasmids, which are?~?6 Mb in length with 5450 open reading frames-12 encoding rRNAs and 77 encoding tRNAs. We further identified 17 putative genes encoding the enzymes involved in the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins in sensing chemical gradients during chemotaxis. The annotated complete genome sequence of this…

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

De novo assembly of a wild pear (Pyrus betuleafolia) genome.

China is the origin and evolutionary centre of Oriental pears. Pyrus betuleafolia is a wild species native to China and distributed in the northern region, and it is widely used as rootstock. Here, we report the de novo assembly of the genome of P. betuleafolia-Shanxi Duli using an integrated strategy that combines PacBio sequencing, BioNano mapping and chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) sequencing. The genome assembly size was 532.7 Mb, with a contig N50 of 1.57 Mb. A total of 59 552 protein-coding genes and 247.4 Mb of repetitive sequences were annotated for this genome. The expansion genes in P. betuleafolia were significantly enriched in secondary metabolism,…

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